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Old 08-16-2015, 10:56 PM   #1
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Default Take a look at these pics of patchwork - should I prime?

Hey all! I did a lot of patchwork on this home and have read war stories about trying to cover joint compound without seeing flashing. I will be using SW Promar 200 Flat (rolling 2 coats) in a medium dark brown.

SW tells me not to prime which does not sound right. They said it will flash no matter what but to use the actual paint as a primer, then topcoat twice and it will be best. This doesn't sound right. I am thinking to using Zinsser 1-2-3 latex primer on the joint compound and sections of fresh drywall, then topcoating with 2 hits of Promar 200.

What is your advice? Can I prevent flashing in this case and if so, what is my best method?
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Take a look at these pics of patchwork - should I prime?-patch1.jpg  

Take a look at these pics of patchwork - should I prime?-patch2.jpg  


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Old 08-16-2015, 11:03 PM   #2
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I agree with SW. Use the paint to prime. The problem with spot priming with an actual primer when you are using flat paint is that the spot primed areas are actually sealed while the rest of the wall may not be. So, the paint will not soak in where you did the spot priming, but it may soak in where you did not prime, so you will get a flash. If you are going to prime, you need to prime the whole wall, but if your paint is flat, priming is not necessary.
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Old 08-16-2015, 11:03 PM   #3
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most likely they will send you to the diy site since this is for proffessionals but If you do not want flashing prime the entire wall and paint.
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Old 08-16-2015, 11:05 PM   #4
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Old 08-16-2015, 11:13 PM   #5
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So far I have two choices then:

1. spot prime with the actual paint, then topcoat

OR

2. prime all walls, then topcoat

Obviously option 1 is much quicker and cheaper. Are the results going to be the same as if I prime the whole wall? What is the SAFEST way to go?
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:13 AM   #6
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Spot prime with the top coat (not a heavy coat) OR prime the entire wall with primer. Wait, did somebody already say that? I agree with the first intelligent poster.


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Old 08-17-2015, 02:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2002mrhill View Post
So far I have two choices then:

1. spot prime with the actual paint, then topcoat

OR

2. prime all walls, then topcoat

Obviously option 1 is much quicker and cheaper. Are the results going to be the same as if I prime the whole wall? What is the SAFEST way to go?
Really?
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Old 08-17-2015, 05:03 AM   #8
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Try spot priming an area if you have a small wall with some patches. I've got good results from spot priming with paint then top coat 2 coats. Sometime it takes another full coat of paint, depending on the product you have, what's under etc... Try a small wall where you can test and see for yourself which strategy is best. It's not like, unless you're using **** paint, you're gonna ruin it by not doing it properly, it might just require another coat of paint. Just don't use bad primer (aka SW PVA primer, for example).
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:00 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazz_Painter View Post
Try spot priming an area if you have a small wall with some patches. I've got good results from spot priming with paint then top coat 2 coats. Sometime it takes another full coat of paint, depending on the product you have, what's under etc... Try a small wall where you can test and see for yourself which strategy is best. It's not like, unless you're using **** paint, you're gonna ruin it by not doing it properly, it might just require another coat of paint. Just don't use bad primer (aka SW PVA primer, for example).
like pro mar 200?
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:35 AM   #10
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Really?? Listen man always always always prime. Anyone telling you otherwise is a fool in my opinion. Especially because your using promar as finish. Professional painters always keep primer stocked. I use aqualock. Welcome.
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:49 AM   #11
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I actually like to use a cheap pva primer for spot priming. It's just good enough to prevent flashing yet crappy enough to not completely seal the surface so it will all dry evenly.

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Old 08-17-2015, 08:10 AM   #12
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That kind of flashing is often as much about texture as it is sheen hold out. If the smooth patch is surrounded by a rough, nappy wall then it will show some variation even if you do everything "right" in terms of coating. I like to sand the entire wall before patching in these situations to reduce textural differences before they happen.

With many of today's high hiding top coats like Emerald, Aura or Regal, spot priming with a separate product in these situations has become superfluous. Idk for sure about the pro mar. Normally I recommend that people listen to the manufacturers/reps in these situations. Then again we are talking about a Sherwin clerk.

Maybe check the Promar specs for a clue. I don't think it's self priming on drywall, so there's one clue.
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Old 08-17-2015, 11:27 AM   #13
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I've found that with most flats your just fine without spot priming, Superpaint flat, promar 200, ect. Not the case with Cashmere flat enamel tho, that you have to spot prime. In this particular case I'd spot prime because the color is going to be a "medium dark brown" as we know the more tint usually the more shine and shine is your enemy with flat when not spot priming.
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Old 08-17-2015, 11:53 AM   #14
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If you really get the primer out to spot prime when the finish is dead flat, then you don't know what primer is for.
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:18 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
That kind of flashing is often as much about texture as it is sheen hold out. If the smooth patch is surrounded by a rough, nappy wall then it will show some variation even if you do everything "right" in terms of coating. I like to sand the entire wall before patching in these situations to reduce textural differences before they happen.
I'd double that, yet instead of sanding, have no idea why would anyone sand so much, try to match the pattern of the previous texture surrounding the patches. Prime has to go before the texture though, as the book says and in case of a screw-up with texture application it can be wiped and redone.

After "new texture" is applied, couple of thicker coats of paint has to be applied to the patched area to make a "build up" in order to make it look like the old painted surrounding wall, which already has few coats and texture is not as pronounced as on the patched area. That will eliminate "flashing" AMAP.
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rbriggs82 View Post
I actually like to use a cheap pva primer for spot priming. It's just good enough to prevent flashing yet crappy enough to not completely seal the surface so it will all dry evenly.

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That actually makes sense! I never thought of that.
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:54 PM   #17
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One coat of Emerald Semigloss and you are good to go! The darker the color the better! Use a 3/16 nap roller so it goes on extra smooth!
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:58 PM   #18
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Quote:
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That actually makes sense! I never thought of that.
Yup, it's one of those things I wish I'd learned a lot sooner. Saves a lot of headaches with flashing problems.

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Old 08-17-2015, 01:42 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rbriggs82 View Post
Yup, it's one of those things I wish I'd learned a lot sooner. Saves a lot of headaches with flashing problems.

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Old 08-17-2015, 01:47 PM   #20
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When painters come up with their preferred systems for new drywall, do they ever take into account what the actual drywall, tape, and mud manufacturers recommend for a painting spec? For Level 3 and above they generally say to prime everything. Just curious, as most of the NC home painters and GC's I have supplied in the past just did two coats of flat. Then the homeowner is left to deal with or live with any future flashing issues. Just curious what you guys would do on your own houses if cost was no object.
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