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Old 11-08-2011, 03:29 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by kdpaint View Post
I love glazing. Don't know why, just do. Many hate it, some have good results,but are sloooooow, which usually makes them hate it more. Until they become good and fast. Here in NE, there are many glazing jobs. For me, glazing referrals get me a lot of int/ext work from guys who don't glaze. Suckers. Its like letting the fox in the hen house.
I have seen many effective glazing techniques, and have incorporated many into how I do it. When I was looking to increase my production time, I went to a glazier shop I bought all my glass from and asked for a tutorial when he had the time. I had been glazing for 4 years and thought pretty highly of my technique. Within the first minute I got schooled. i had been using a 2 inch flex putty knife. He (serious old school Mainer) and others since, explained that in order to really push the glazing compound into the wood grain of the muntin for a lasting seal, I should use the heel of my palm, using the force and weight of my arm and thumb to roll it along the muntin. Then use a glazing knife, or stiff putty knife(old chisels work well) to shape the putty and get the perfect angles.
Since the palm technique is best used when the sash is on a table, if the sash is still installed (not ideal, but...), I bed the putty, then use an angled glazing tool and crank down really hard to really push the putty into the grain.
I repair a lot of painter glazing jobs. Other than wavy lines, visable putty(from inside) and cr@p corner angles, the most common fail is glazing lifting up from the muntin in a straight line crack, sometimes packed with paint when they top coated, or not if the failure was after the paint job, with the crack exposed to the elements. This failure is due to insufficient pressure applied when seating the glazing compound. Most real glaziers have crazy hitchiker's thumb from the pressure they exert seating the putty. This pressure is the difference between a job I would warranty and I job I would not.

What the??? do you put putty onto the bare wood? you're sposed to prime it first so the oil doesnt soak into the wood and fall out.

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Old 11-08-2011, 03:40 PM   #22
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What's this?!?!!?

Nobodies using an OIL primer in the channel BEFORE glazing?!

Technically it should be done so older/dry wood doesn't leech Oils from the putty out too fast, causing cracking.
Slow-dry primers are best, if time permits.

Time consuming....yes....
"More" correct....also yes.

Faron
Wait.....if you look at the video the inside frame has been primed, but he should have mentioned it. especially on the bottom rail.
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:41 PM   #23
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Faron,

You are absolutely correct, HOWEVER (and who didn't predict THAT ), I found that Penetrol works actually better. It soaks in deeper and having it own driers, seals the wood so it don't suck the life out of the glazing compound.
cheers.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:11 PM   #24
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cheers.
another resurrected, ancient thread
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:45 PM   #25
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We glaze with water putty. costs about $7 for a small can, but it dries like spackle.
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Old 11-08-2011, 07:00 PM   #26
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I just discovered aquaglaze myself. I used it on a job this passed summer and it seemed to work pretty well. I was looking at an elastomeric glazing compound that comes out of a caulking tube but I haven't had a chance to try it. It's called glaze-ease 601 and it's intriguing. I'd love to hear a review if anyone has used it. Here's a youtube video. [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf_NseHvPVM"]youtube video[/ame]
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Old 11-08-2011, 07:46 PM   #27
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I will usually have several windows to work on at once, so I glaze just 2 sides of each pane (opposite sides) for a few units I'm working on, then come back and do the other sides after the first have dried some. That's been my easiest way to get nice mitered corners.

I did some on a really hot week this summer. What a pain.

About that tube glaze... might be nice with new sashes like in the video but spot glazing 100+ year old windows with knicks and different depths might not be ideal from what I see. Could be too soft to really push in to uneven areas without making a mess. I still might try it if I see it around.

Not a fan of the DAP in a tube either, my biggest complaint with that stuff is the size of the opening, the square angle does have potential though.

josh
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:19 PM   #28
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I just discovered aquaglaze myself. I used it on a job this passed summer and it seemed to work pretty well. I was looking at an elastomeric glazing compound that comes out of a caulking tube but I haven't had a chance to try it. It's called glaze-ease 601 and it's intriguing. I'd love to hear a review if anyone has used it. Here's a youtube video. youtube video
Do you reckon you could use ordinary caulking ?
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:28 PM   #29
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edit: nvm

Good tip though Pat. Good thread I like this skill.

Last edited by Ultimate; 11-08-2011 at 08:36 PM..
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:35 PM   #30
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^ lol Pat in thanking 'Ole on that post. 'Ole is good people. haha

Good tip though Pat. Good thread I like this skill.
Heh - not sure Ole is with us anymore... Not sure if its permanent or just temp vacation.

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Old 11-08-2011, 08:44 PM   #31
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Default Caulk vs putty

Do you think I could use latex caulking instead of putty on and exterior window.
only the bottom putty needs replacing on the windows.
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:47 PM   #32
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Do you think I could use latex caulking instead of putty on and exterior window.
only the bottom putty needs replacing on the windows.
That's what a HO would do. Only time I use caulking for glazing is on the top portion of the bottom sash when the top sash has been painted shut and the HO does not care to have it working again.

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Old 11-08-2011, 08:50 PM   #33
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Heh - not sure Ole is with us anymore... Not sure if its permanent or just temp vacation.

Pat
It depends on how you read that complete post with your thanks as to finding the humor in it.

What? Nah...... Ah well. He will be back I hope.
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Old 11-08-2011, 11:49 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by mv8710
Do you think I could use latex caulking instead of putty on and exterior window.
only the bottom putty needs replacing on the windows.
I use OSI QUAD and tape off the glass to create a straight line. A long time glass guy showed me that technique. I know it's not standard restoration procedures, but the caulk will last longer than the glazing compound. It works great for spot glazing, and I recently replaced several panes on several windows and it worked well for that too. You won't get the perfect corners that an expert glazier will get, but it looked pretty good. I reckon this will catch some heat from the purists, and that's ok. Usually the spot repairs look better than the rest of the glazing in the window anyways.
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Old 11-09-2011, 01:33 AM   #35
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thanks
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:49 AM   #36
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I would like to say one thing... I HATE WINDOW GLAZING!!!!!

The funny thing is that I have to teach it and I am crap at it. I show the video below and tell my students in all honesty that it is not my strong point. Then I proceed to demonstrate the best way I can, I am slow but in the end it looks okay.

The embarrassing thing is that usually my students end up doing it better and faster then me.

I suppose we can't be good at everything.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xewRBdFbCI8"]Window Glazing - YouTube[/ame]
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:56 AM   #37
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another resurrected, ancient thread
Damn, I fell for it again. First post I have made for at least a month and it is to a necro thread.

Man I feel like a sucker!
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Old 11-09-2011, 06:16 AM   #38
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Do you think I could use latex caulking instead of putty on and exterior window.
only the bottom putty needs replacing on the windows.

In a word NO
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Old 11-09-2011, 07:01 AM   #39
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You really don't want to be using caulk to glaze windows. It isn't made for that and it WILL fail prematurely. Stick to products made for the purpose.
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Old 11-09-2011, 10:14 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by mpminter
You really don't want to be using caulk to glaze windows. It isn't made for that and it WILL fail prematurely. Stick to products made for the purpose.
It will fail. You mean like how glazing compound fails? Please expand on the technical and empirical evidence you have for this claim. In my judgment a product that is made to adhere to a variety of substrates, such as a high performance caulking, is probably better suited in some ways than glazing compound. I am willing to be wrong, but I am not convinced by broad statements with no evidence.

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