Unpainted brick - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Painting Forum > General Painting Discussion


Like Tree16Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-01-2016, 10:09 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 4
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View Rons Painting's Photo Album My Photos
Default Unpainted brick

I am looking at my first exterior brick painting project. I need to know how to estimate how much primer and paint (and what type) I will need. Any idea?
Rons Painting is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-01-2016, 11:23 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 300
Thanks: 258
Thanked 108 Times in 75 Posts
View 007 Dave's Photo Album My Photos
Default

My specialty is not painting brick but I have done it. Years ago the company I worked for used oils base timber stain from MAB. We painted two coats on it and I never knew of any problems.

Last year I did one and primed it with PPG Acri shield Bonding primer and finished with Acri shield satin. It turned out great.

Oil base Kilz would be a good primer to use. I didn't use Kilz on my job because the lady was pregnant.I did not want to take that chance. Kilz also has a latex masonry and brick primer. I havn't used it. I have used S.W. loxon primer on block. it worked fine.

My preference would be the oil base kilz for the primer so it would get in the crevasses good. As far as the finish I would think Acri shield, super paint or resilience , . I use Permanizer and Duration most the time on exterior but would stay away from them for painting brick.

To prep it , just do the obvious . Pressure wash, let dry Paint. If you can spray it back rolled with a thick nap watch for runs in the mortar.

You want to figure 25 to 30 percent more product used than regular siding.

Hope this helps
007 Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to 007 Dave For This Useful Post:
Rons Painting (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 03:03 AM   #3
very senior member
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hagerstown md
Posts: 9,191
Rewards Points: 760
Thanks: 3,465
Thanked 5,329 Times in 3,245 Posts
View chrisn's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Not your problem but once painted there is no going back(besides sand blasting) Try talking them out of it( I would)
Joe67 likes this.
chrisn is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
Rons Painting (09-02-2016), Wildbill7145 (09-02-2016)
 
Old 09-02-2016, 03:05 AM   #4
very senior member
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hagerstown md
Posts: 9,191
Rewards Points: 760
Thanks: 3,465
Thanked 5,329 Times in 3,245 Posts
View chrisn's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 Dave View Post
My specialty is not painting brick but I have done it. Years ago the company I worked for used oils base timber stain from MAB. We painted two coats on it and I never knew of any problems.

Last year I did one and primed it with PPG Acri shield Bonding primer and finished with Acri shield satin. It turned out great.

Oil base Kilz would be a good primer to use. I didn't use Kilz on my job because the lady was pregnant.I did not want to take that chance. Kilz also has a latex masonry and brick primer. I havn't used it. I have used S.W. loxon primer on block. it worked fine.

My preference would be the oil base kilz for the primer so it would get in the crevasses good. As far as the finish I would think Acri shield, super paint or resilience , . I use Permanizer and Duration most the time on exterior but would stay away from them for painting brick.

To prep it , just do the obvious . Pressure wash, let dry Paint. If you can spray it back rolled with a thick nap watch for runs in the mortar.

You want to figure 25 to 30 percent more product used than regular siding.

Hope this helps
I don't see any need for an oil primer, but what the hell do I know?
mukhoeb likes this.
chrisn is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
007 Dave (09-02-2016), lilpaintchic (09-02-2016), Rons Painting (09-02-2016), SemiproJohn (09-02-2016), slinger58 (09-02-2016), stelzerpaintinginc. (09-02-2016), Wildbill7145 (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 05:57 AM   #5
PRC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,256
Rewards Points: 42
Thanks: 2,058
Thanked 922 Times in 537 Posts
View PRC's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Masonry conditioner and 100% acrylic topcoats is a solid system.
Joe67 and Rons Painting like this.
PRC is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to PRC For This Useful Post:
clermontpainting (09-02-2016), lilpaintchic (09-02-2016), Rons Painting (09-02-2016), SemiproJohn (09-02-2016), stelzerpaintinginc. (09-02-2016), Tonyg (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 08:29 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 Dave View Post
My specialty is not painting brick but I have done it. Years ago the company I worked for used oils base timber stain from MAB. We painted two coats on it and I never knew of any problems.

Last year I did one and primed it with PPG Acri shield Bonding primer and finished with Acri shield satin. It turned out great.

Oil base Kilz would be a good primer to use. I didn't use Kilz on my job because the lady was pregnant.I did not want to take that chance. Kilz also has a latex masonry and brick primer. I havn't used it. I have used S.W. loxon primer on block. it worked fine.

My preference would be the oil base kilz for the primer so it would get in the crevasses good. As far as the finish I would think Acri shield, super paint or resilience , . I use Permanizer and Duration most the time on exterior but would stay away from them for painting brick.

To prep it , just do the obvious . Pressure wash, let dry Paint. If you can spray it back rolled with a thick nap watch for runs in the mortar.

You want to figure 25 to 30 percent more product used than regular siding.

Hope this helps
007 Dave, I know you are a frequent contributor on painttalk so don't take this the wrong way, please! But I have to know why you have used or would use an oil based product on bare brick or masonry? I haven't been exposed to that before.

Ok I just read the label on a can of Kilz and it does say brick and masonry on it so color me stupid I guess! I've just never seen anyone do it!
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann

Last edited by PACman; 09-02-2016 at 08:33 AM..
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to PACman For This Useful Post:
007 Dave (09-02-2016), Wildbill7145 (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 09:41 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Auburn, Wa
Posts: 2,035
Rewards Points: 10
Thanks: 2,967
Thanked 1,398 Times in 821 Posts
View lilpaintchic's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I would use loxon and 2 coats of superpaint...no idea why oil would even be considered. That's just working wayyyyyyyy too hard. Ever try to get latex overspray off brick? Believe me, latex will bond just fine....
007 Dave and Rons Painting like this.
lilpaintchic is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lilpaintchic For This Useful Post:
CApainter (09-02-2016), Gymschu (09-02-2016), Rons Painting (09-02-2016), Tonyg (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 09:54 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 117
Rewards Points: 234
Thanks: 24
Thanked 89 Times in 48 Posts
View Joe67's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I don't come across having to do masonry products very often, so no deep and special experience here. But that which I do have tells me that prep is more/just as important that choice of primer. A good, through powerwashing and a thorough drying is very important. After that IMO, any good exterior primer spec'd for brick/masonry and topped with your exterior paint of your preference (I most like BM, for example) will be good. (Side-note, one of the most annoying things is getting complete coverage to the bottom. If the brick meets dirt, dig out a little trench all around and get the powerwash down below grade so you can get clean paint down to grade).

As for amounts, you didn't say anything about the brick itself. They vary a lot in terms of coarseness of surface, porosity, age. So, especially for the primer coat adjust the manufacturer's estimate of coverage down depending on those characteristics of the brick. For particularly rough brick surfaces, for example, assume you need 50-100%-ish more than typical coverage. The amount needed will decline with each successive coat.
007 Dave and Rons Painting like this.
Joe67 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Joe67 For This Useful Post:
Rons Painting (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 10:08 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilpaintchic View Post
I would use loxon and 2 coats of superpaint...no idea why oil would even be considered. That's just working wayyyyyyyy too hard. Ever try to get latex overspray off brick? Believe me, latex will bond just fine....
I've always been told by the various paint companies I've worked for that you either "couldn't", "shouldn't", or "can't" use oil base on brick and masonry. I don't think I have ever known why other than it may be overkill. I looked at every oil based primer I sell and none of them say they can be used on masonry and a couple even specifically say not to use them on masonry. I looked at specification sheets from P&L,California, Muralo, Richard's, even SW and none of them spec an oil based product on brick but none of them specifically say why.

I'd Google it but we all know who full of it those internet people are!
007 Dave likes this.
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PACman For This Useful Post:
lilpaintchic (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 10:16 AM   #10
PRC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,256
Rewards Points: 42
Thanks: 2,058
Thanked 922 Times in 537 Posts
View PRC's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PACman View Post
I've always been told by the various paint companies I've worked for that you either "couldn't", "shouldn't", or "can't" use oil base on brick and masonry. I don't think I have ever known why other than it may be overkill. I looked at every oil based primer I sell and none of them say they can be used on masonry and a couple even specifically say not to use them on masonry. I looked at specification sheets from P&L,California, Muralo, Richard's, even SW and none of them spec an oil based product on brick but none of them specifically say why.

I'd Google it but we all know who full of it those internet people are!
It would not be my choice and it suprised me to read it but BM fresh start 024 alkyd tds say it is good for cured masonry.
PRC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 10:36 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PRC View Post
It would not be my choice and it suprised me to read it but BM fresh start 024 alkyd tds say it is good for cured masonry.
Well I'll be, it does say that doesn't it? The plot thickens I guess. I got from Cali that a primer used on brick has to be "breathable".
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 11:02 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I guess the brick people agree!
http://www.gobrick.com/portals/25/do...0notes/tn6.pdf
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 11:42 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 591
Rewards Points: 133
Thanks: 83
Thanked 271 Times in 179 Posts
View PNW Painter's Photo Album My Photos
Default

One of the big issues you'll have when painting brick is cleaning the brick. It must be cleaned very well because dirt, moss, algae, etc... all like to stick to brick.

If the surface is chalky you may need to apply a conditioner first.
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/docu.../035777121290/

Once you've figured out what primer you'll be using you can topcoat with just about any acrylic exterior paint such as SuperPaint or BM Regal Select.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
007 Dave and Rons Painting like this.
PNW Painter is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PNW Painter For This Useful Post:
Rons Painting (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 01:33 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
CApainter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Posts: 11,286
Rewards Points: 804
Thanks: 10,666
Thanked 9,141 Times in 5,064 Posts
View CApainter's Photo Album My Photos
Default

With brick, you're dealing with two substrates. One that is a cementitious mortar, and the other that is a kiln dried...well, brick?

I think the problems will occur more at the mortar joints than on the brick. Therefore, I would use an acrylic primer that is compatible with a high ph substrate.
Rons Painting likes this.
__________________
To avoid criticism, say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.-Aristotle (referenced from The PokerKid)
CApainter is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to CApainter For This Useful Post:
007 Dave (09-02-2016), journeymanPainter (09-02-2016), lilpaintchic (09-02-2016), Rons Painting (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 01:37 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
journeymanPainter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Vancouver(surrounding area) BC
Posts: 2,860
Rewards Points: 674
Thanks: 3,270
Thanked 1,640 Times in 1,052 Posts
View journeymanPainter's Photo Album My Photos
Default

What about Marque?
That stuff will stick to anything
journeymanPainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 04:28 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CApainter View Post
With brick, you're dealing with two substrates. One that is a cementitious mortar, and the other that is a kiln dried...well, brick?

I think the problems will occur more at the mortar joints than on the brick. Therefore, I would use an acrylic primer that is compatible with a high ph substrate.
yup! That's exactly what the brick manufacturing people say. Oil based products will react with the high alkalinity of the mortar and what do you get? Say it with me now......SAPONIFICATION. Still one of my favorite words.
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to PACman For This Useful Post:
007 Dave (09-02-2016), CApainter (09-02-2016), journeymanPainter (09-02-2016), lilpaintchic (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 04:29 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
PACman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,346
Rewards Points: 1,610
Thanks: 2,991
Thanked 4,207 Times in 2,776 Posts
View PACman's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by journeymanPainter View Post
What about Marque?
That stuff will stick to anything
Except drywall. And according to a poster in the diyforum, wood trim.
__________________
"One who dares not offend cannot be honest." Thomas Paine-patriot

"Screw you guys! I'm going home!" Cartmann
PACman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 06:06 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: WV
Posts: 179
Rewards Points: 278
Thanks: 18
Thanked 74 Times in 57 Posts
View ParamountPaint's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I've used PPG Perma-Crete primer without issue in the past. I also use it on "hot" Hardi.

Block filler might work...never tried it on brick, but it could smooth it out a bit. If you have a hard glazed brick, you're gonna have some problems.
ParamountPaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 06:13 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Gymschu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Eastern Ohio (Appalachia)
Posts: 658
Rewards Points: 252
Thanks: 1,532
Thanked 671 Times in 329 Posts
View Gymschu's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I didn't know you could use KILZ on exterior work. Guess you learn something new everyday.

For the SW haters out there, Loxon is one heckuva great masonry primer and that's what I would use in this case. Like lilpaintchic said, Loxon and two coats of superpaint and it's done.
Gymschu is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Gymschu For This Useful Post:
007 Dave (09-02-2016)
Old 09-02-2016, 07:02 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
AngieM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Cedar Rapids Iowa
Posts: 378
Rewards Points: 34
Thanks: 402
Thanked 190 Times in 126 Posts
View AngieM's Photo Album My Photos
Default

@PACman

saponify


verb*(used*with*object),*saponified, saponifying.

1.to*convert*(a*fat)*into*soap*by*treating*withan* alkali.

2.to*decompose*(any*ester),*forming*thecorrespondi ng*alcohol*and*acid* or*salt.

Translation?
007 Dave likes this.
AngieM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What would you do - staining brick PNW Painter Specialty Coatings 14 10-17-2016 06:12 PM
Painting painted brick Exactoman General Painting Discussion 10 05-29-2016 09:04 PM
Painting Brick ElTacoPaco General Painting Discussion 16 01-17-2016 02:03 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com