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Old 03-20-2017, 08:21 PM   #1
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Default Protect a Warehouse Floor

We recently were awarded a job where we will need to cover the entire Concrete Floor inside of a Warehouse (50,000+) Square Feet.

We will be driving over the protection with 60' Boom Lifts.

Currently thinking of String/Fiber Reinforced Plastic with Plywood Panels if there is a need to turn.

Anybody done anything similar or have any ideas?

We have to protect the Floor as the Specified material is not Dryfall. (2 part Epoxy/Urethane) It's going to cost a lot of money anyway we do this.

Figured I would ask!
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Old 03-20-2017, 08:25 PM   #2
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Yup done plenty of it. Why 60' booms? Have you considered scissors?

Bar joist or precast?
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Old 03-20-2017, 09:01 PM   #3
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Scissors are sooo much easier. How high you trying to get? Bigger the scissors the bigger the platform. Bigger platform makes work easier plus the manuverability from point to point. May want to deck as much as you can because sticky wheels on plastic sucks. Cheapo masonite the sucker. Duct tape the seams with a plastic base liner.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:55 PM   #4
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Scissors are sooo much easier. How high you trying to get? Bigger the scissors the bigger the platform. Bigger platform makes work easier plus the manuverability from point to point. May want to deck as much as you can because sticky wheels on plastic sucks. Cheapo masonite the sucker. Duct tape the seams with a plastic base liner.
Lol. Epoxy and urethane I can almost picture the masonite peeling up when u come back from break and it's good an sticky

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Old 03-21-2017, 07:19 AM   #5
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Lol. Dont take a break.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:34 AM   #6
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Sorry, Just getting back to this.

We will have one Scissor on site.

Floor is a Precast Slab. Peak height is 45' from top to bottom. We are Pressure washing (6000 PSI) and then: Spot Prime, Full prime, Intermediate, and Finish Coat interior Walls and Ceiling.

We are using Booms for two reasons:

1) They will be digging a 40'x40'x200' Trench in the middle of the warehouse and we have to reach across it.
2) Less turning of wheels on plastic.

The Plan as it stands is a crew of 10 guys. 4 Booms, each has someone driving and someone Spraying. Plus guys tending Pot.

The Full Prime has a 1Hr Pot life. (yes, 1 hour. - US Coating Rust Grip) They brought us the job so we feel compelled to use them.

Anyway, We are going to cover with Fiber Reinforced Plastic. Probablly order a pallet of Masonite so we can build a deck if we need to turn. (Masonite is easier to move around than Plywood)

Thanks for the thoughts. Keep the ideas coming. I know how we plan on doing it, but I'm always open to better ideas.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:46 AM   #7
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For what it's worth, heavyweight tar paper works for good for running along long walls, possibly bigger areas. We rolled out 50-100' out on long commercial exterior walls to cover the ground. And used both types of lifts over them. That elimates any masking at the bottom of the walls and spray right to it like a paint shield.
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Old 03-21-2017, 12:03 PM   #8
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For what it's worth, heavyweight tar paper works for good for running along long walls, possibly bigger areas. We rolled out 50-100' out on long commercial exterior walls to cover the ground. And used both types of lifts over them. That elimates any masking at the bottom of the walls and spray right to it like a paint shield.
We do this too. Although I learned (On this forum years ago) that Roofing Shingles are great for this type of work too. (Easier to move around and you can do corners really easily)
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Old 03-21-2017, 04:50 PM   #9
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3M spray adhesive works real good for fastening your poly to the floor. it might leave a little residue here and there but nothing major. make sure the plastic is glued/taped down GOOD AND TIGHT. slack in the plastic will just about guarantee it will wrap up in your axles. Rather than driving back and forth across the building, spray everything you can in a given area using the reach of the boom. Then move forward 50-100 feet and do the next section as big as you can. You want to make a few basic calculations to get the job done with as few miles on the lift tires as you can. It exponentially decreases the frustation/aggravation/time dealing with plastic ripping off the floor. You'll see what I mean when you drive over the sticky floor that got sprayed shortly before.

In my experience, its not worth having a separate guy just for "driving" the lift. Unless his/her time is literally free. even then its debatable b/c they also tend to get in the way a lot. they will spend 90% or more of their time just watching the spray man. and then when they are driving, the spray guy will be doing nothing except resting his arms anyway. 1 man per lift.

also is the lift outfit gonna pre-wax the lifts? plan on them having spray dust 1/4" thick by the time your done.


Tint the coats different shades/colors so you can see where you've been and where you are going.

Nice job btw! That's right up my alley Im kinda drooling...
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Old 03-21-2017, 06:02 PM   #10
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Since we're asking about covering floors I have a similar project that is 50k sq ft. I will be shooting dryfall and the floor has commercial grade carpet. Any suggestions other than plastic tarps? Lifts will be all terrain scissor lifts.
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Old 03-21-2017, 08:43 PM   #11
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3M spray adhesive works real good for fastening your poly to the floor.
Its by far the Best thing for Plastic to Plastic too. (However we will use the Polytape at the seams because of the tires.

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Rather than driving back and forth across the building, spray everything you can in a given area using the reach of the boom. Then move forward 50-100 feet and do the next section as big as you can. You want to make a few basic calculations to get the job done with as few miles on the lift tires as you can. It exponentially decreases the frustation/aggravation/time dealing with plastic ripping off the floor. You'll see what I mean when you drive over the sticky floor that got sprayed shortly before.
I feel you. We are coordinating tomorrow. The Idea is to Spray the area behind the Lifts. (Swing the arm behind the lift and keep the Body in front of the spray.) Work away from the area you sprayed. So that you are always driving ahead of the area you are spraying.

This should give us a minimum 12 hours before we have to drive over any overspray and the longest material Pot Life is 4 Hours. We are planing on having runners ready for the tires though that the ground guys can place if the plastic wants to lift.


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In my experience, its not worth having a separate guy just for "driving" the lift. Unless his/her time is literally free. even then its debatable b/c they also tend to get in the way a lot. they will spend 90% or more of their time just watching the spray man. and then when they are driving, the spray guy will be doing nothing except resting his arms anyway. 1 man per lift.
Schedule forces us to keep working. We tend to work well this way because they can switch off and not get fatigued too fast. Our guys are capable of spraying and moving. Mil Requirements are pretty easy to achieve with each coat, so they can spray while swinging the arm around.

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also is the lift outfit gonna pre-wax the lifts? plan on them having spray dust 1/4" thick by the time your done.
Yep they are coming pre-waxed. We will drape each bucket and even have money in it for a cleaning service that specializes in Equipment Overspray.


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Tint the coats different shades/colors so you can see where you've been and where you are going.
Always a good idea, although not required in this particular Spec. Each coat is a completely different material. Every material (Minus the Bare Metal Primer) is a full coat, No Stripe Coats. Also, luckily everything is a standard color so we can return anything that doesn't get used. (We are ordering as needed though so we shouldn't end up with much "extra".

It'll be a fun job, Coordination is whats kicking my butt at the moment.

Just found out our 3 new Pressure washers hadn't shipped as of this morning. Now the Company gets to expedite them to the Jobsite for Monday!
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Old 03-21-2017, 08:49 PM   #12
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Since we're asking about covering floors I have a similar project that is 50k sq ft. I will be shooting dryfall and the floor has commercial grade carpet. Any suggestions other than plastic tarps? Lifts will be all terrain scissor lifts.
This is what we are using:

Eagle String Reinforced Poly

The Non Flame Retardant comes in rolls of 40'x100'. A Pallet of 12 is around $2400 plus shipping (around $200 for our job, but there is a Distro Center within 300 miles of our jobsite.

They have been good to work with. Steven Keppel is the sales guy we have dealt with.

Before you spend any money though, I guess the important question is how close is the paint color to the carpet??
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Old 03-21-2017, 09:10 PM   #13
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Its by far the Best thing for Plastic to Plastic too. (However we will use the Polytape at the seams because of the tires.



I feel you. We are coordinating tomorrow. The Idea is to Spray the area behind the Lifts. (Swing the arm behind the lift and keep the Body in front of the spray.) Work away from the area you sprayed. So that you are always driving ahead of the area you are spraying.

This should give us a minimum 12 hours before we have to drive over any overspray and the longest material Pot Life is 4 Hours. We are planing on having runners ready for the tires though that the ground guys can place if the plastic wants to lift.




Schedule forces us to keep working. We tend to work well this way because they can switch off and not get fatigued too fast. Our guys are capable of spraying and moving. Mil Requirements are pretty easy to achieve with each coat, so they can spray while swinging the arm around.



Yep they are coming pre-waxed. We will drape each bucket and even have money in it for a cleaning service that specializes in Equipment Overspray.




Always a good idea, although not required in this particular Spec. Each coat is a completely different material. Every material (Minus the Bare Metal Primer) is a full coat, No Stripe Coats. Also, luckily everything is a standard color so we can return anything that doesn't get used. (We are ordering as needed though so we shouldn't end up with much "extra".

It'll be a fun job, Coordination is whats kicking my butt at the moment.

Just found out our 3 new Pressure washers hadn't shipped as of this morning. Now the Company gets to expedite them to the Jobsite for Monday!
I understand the tight schedule. Probably too late now to switch. But having 1 person in a lift and working two shifts would be a lot faster than having two guys in a lift. Probably a 30% or more savings on man hours and have the job done a week ahead of schedule.

Think about it this way. If u have two guys in a lift, only 1 can really be working at a time. So your getting 50% of the production your paying for.

With 1 guy in a lift, he should work 100% of the time. Yes alternating b/t spraying and driving, but nevertheless he's working 100%. Run two shifts and you get 16 hours worth of ceiling sprayed for 16 hours of labor, in 1 calendar day.

The other way, you only get 8 hours worth of ceiling sprayed per calendar day but pay 16 hours labor. I understand the concept of "keeping the lift moving", it just never seems to come to fruition. Especially a boom lift, they're too bouncy. Its easier in a scissor, but still unpredictable enough to really ziptie the trigger. Did a lot of Home Depots and Menards back in the heyday.

We've done a lot of BIG jobs and basically determined that the more guys on site, the less efficient the job is. Yes, sometimes schedule overrides efficiency.

Anyway something to think about for your next job. I'm sure you'll do well. Keep good track of your numbers and compare on the next one.

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Old 03-21-2017, 09:31 PM   #14
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With 1 guy in a lift, he should work 100% of the time. Yes alternating b/t spraying and driving, but nevertheless he's working 100%. Run two shifts and you get 16 hours worth of ceiling sprayed for 16 hours of labor, in 1 calendar day.
Yeah, This isn't our first Rodeo either. I appreciate seeing how other approach the same situation differently too.

I would argue the efficiency is negligible. Although the real issue at hand is more the 1 hour potlife at 75 degrees. We need to get as much of that particular material on as much surface as possible, as fast as possible. Time spent having to maneuver the boom is killer.

Also, I tell our guys: Look, this is how I do it, and what I expect. If you have a better way to do it, but can get the same results, go for it. We micromanage the results, not the process. Point being, it may get done your way anyway.
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Old 03-21-2017, 10:44 PM   #15
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I'm with Kent's methods of havng two guys. It's much safer, much more feasible to make it through the day without being completely wore out physically and mentally.

The guy driving is spotting everything around the lift or work area, while he is not driving. Motioning/communicating to any ground guys to move any cones, barriers, obstacless, etc. The spray guy is focused on spraying, keeping his eyes on the work more without switching focus to driving safely every minute or less...

It's much safer, easier to get solid results, and fair to the painters in my opinion.
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:58 PM   #16
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I got a similar job minus the height access. About 40k of deck and joist and electrical and hvac and well everything. Crappy part is the spec is epoxy. Over finished polished floors. Kinda wish i was working at height. Anyways, architect is a moron and i bid it per spec so whatever. Im not looking forward to walking in soup. Kinda thinking through floor protection on this one as well. Thinking 6 mil plastic in a 2 day prep run and get in over the weekend while trades are off and KO'ing it.

Roamer (if you read this) did yall do the Pentagon cafeteria remodel relatively recently for K&W contractors? We are doing all the drywall and FRP on this one here on campus and I think couldnt be prouder of all the overhead furdown work that goes into their crazy projects. We got radiused inverted domes all over this place. The drywall work is frankly brilliant and I got to get around to taking some after shots when we wrap this puppy up.
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