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Old 05-06-2010, 10:10 AM   #21
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I have been trying to get a straight answer on whether or not hardie board will move over time because if so I will probably stay away from rigid fillers but if it is a material that never moves or shrinks than I will probably use something like bondo for the seems and what not. Seel the sucker up and make her pertty! Any thoughts?

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Old 05-06-2010, 10:35 AM   #22
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I learned (from who knows where....) to use vulkem on hardy... But the question I have is; vulkem is typically used prior to my service and the caulk has either disappeared or is seperating from one side of the butt joint or the other, what good is it to reapply it? Eventually it will do the same thing in the future right? I have yet to determine whether or not the siding is expanding and contracting (concrete siding, hardy board) or the caulk is evaperating or shrinking into some black hole unknowingly surrounding the house.... pffft... Then again, I have yet to find anything better than vulkem and HIGHLY ask for recommendations.

Is there a caulk that can withstand the extreme weather conditions of heat and cold exchange without shrinking, evaporating or releasing it's grip from the surface of it's application? I would be willing to put a few more $$'s into a better or higher quality caulk than vulkem or the similar stuff SW's sells.

As for putty on an exterior, I don't ever recall using it for that purpose, and interior holes get lightweight spackle (typically picture frame nail holes) or sheetrock repair (holes too big for spackle)...
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Old 05-06-2010, 01:43 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason@API View Post
I learned (from who knows where....) to use vulkem on hardy... But the question I have is; vulkem is typically used prior to my service and the caulk has either disappeared or is seperating from one side of the butt joint or the other, what good is it to reapply it? Eventually it will do the same thing in the future right? I have yet to determine whether or not the siding is expanding and contracting (concrete siding, hardy board) or the caulk is evaperating or shrinking into some black hole unknowingly surrounding the house.... pffft... Then again, I have yet to find anything better than vulkem and HIGHLY ask for recommendations.

Is there a caulk that can withstand the extreme weather conditions of heat and cold exchange without shrinking, evaporating or releasing it's grip from the surface of it's application? I would be willing to put a few more $$'s into a better or higher quality caulk than vulkem or the similar stuff SW's sells.

As for putty on an exterior, I don't ever recall using it for that purpose, and interior holes get lightweight spackle (typically picture frame nail holes) or sheetrock repair (holes too big for spackle)...
I firmly believe, back in the day, Vulkem was some of the best caulking you could purchase. The last 8 years or so, not so much. I won't touch the stuff.

Next time you start a job where the Vulkem has disappeared (failed), give Big Stretch a shot. It's not cheap, but I bet you will like it.

Then drive by the exterior you painted a year later and see where the Big Stretch is working and the remaining Vulkem is still failing.
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Old 05-27-2010, 11:37 AM   #24
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featherlite mud. That stuff rules! inside and out for nailholes. No shrinky, very light sandy.

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