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Old 12-13-2016, 01:22 PM   #21
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A good rule of the thumb is to "work smarter not harder". I use Sherwin-Williams 850A Acrylic Latex Caulk from baseboards to gaps where carports meet siding. At times I see 1/2 inch gaps I just cut off a mean sized tip and will drop a whole tube if needed. Been doing it for years. With Oklahoma City having 4 seasons and many tremors do to fracking I have not had 1 complaint.
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Old 12-13-2016, 09:49 PM   #22
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A good rule of the thumb is to "work smarter not harder". I use Sherwin-Williams 850A Acrylic Latex Caulk from baseboards to gaps where carports meet siding. At times I see 1/2 inch gaps I just cut off a mean sized tip and will drop a whole tube if needed. Been doing it for years. With Oklahoma City having 4 seasons and many tremors do to fracking I have not had 1 complaint.
This sounds like cutting corners, not working smarter. What if they're not complaining because they're hiring someone else?
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:31 PM   #23
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Every caulk shrinks. I use backer rod if the crack is big and caulk twice if necessary.


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Old 12-14-2016, 12:14 AM   #24
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@Showtime I'm all for working smarter, not harder. Cutting a huge hole in the tip might get the job done faster, but it's not the correct way to fill a large gap.

If you read the data sheet for 850A it's says gaps should be no more than 1/2" wide or deep. It also says that it's best used in areas of low joint movement and is commonly used for interior applications.


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Old 12-14-2016, 01:33 AM   #25
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I do the same thing only with quick dry caulk. Cut a huge hole, load it up and use it as backer for a finish bead. Sometimes in less than ideal situations, ya gotta use less than ideal methods.thats been my experience anyway....the alternative is to install the base better....maybe a better style of base or a better application method? Don't know, can't see the project.
"A little caulk, a little paint, makes a Carpenter what he ain't!"
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Old 12-14-2016, 10:32 AM   #26
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I do the same thing only with quick dry caulk. Cut a huge hole, load it up and use it as backer for a finish bead. Sometimes in less than ideal situations, ya gotta use less than ideal methods.thats been my experience anyway....the alternative is to install the base better....maybe a better style of base or a better application method? Don't know, can't see the project.
"A little caulk, a little paint, makes a Carpenter what he ain't!"
Having just installed some new base in a bathroom (replacing mdf trim with real wood) for a customer, I have to say it may not always be the finish carpenter's fault. When the walls and their corners are messed up due to poor framing or sheetrock work (or both) it's pretty tough to lay down a decent baseboard job without the assist of caulk.
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Old 12-14-2016, 10:43 AM   #27
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Having just installed some new base in a bathroom (replacing mdf trim with real wood) for a customer, I have to say it may not always be the finish carpenter's fault. When the walls and their corners are messed up due to poor framing or sheetrock work (or both) it's pretty tough to lay down a decent baseboard job without the assist of caulk.
Wonky walls are one reason why sometimes mdf isn't such a bad choice. Nice and bendy. That being said, in the corners it won't really matter. Nothing but a lot of caulking is gonna make that look good. At the end of the day, it's still gonna be obvious but at least it looks better.
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Old 12-14-2016, 10:54 AM   #28
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Wonky walls are one reason why sometimes mdf isn't such a bad choice. Nice and bendy. That being said, in the corners it won't really matter. Nothing but a lot of caulking is gonna make that look good. At the end of the day, it's still gonna be obvious but at least it looks better.
Yeah, except in bathrooms where tubs and showers are present. I think it should be code that mdf can't be used as base in those rooms. Maybe even include utility rooms as well.

In the case of the project I'm doing the floors were recently replaced and the floor installers removed all the base but even though it was obviously swollen and paint was chipping off, they simply put it back on without at least discussing some options (ex. - "Should we leave it off so you can get someone to replace it with new stock? We have the names of several guys who can do that for you.") with the HO. Of course, once I painted the walls the deteriorating trim stuck out even more. So, off it came and new wood (well, finger jointed preprimed material - but still better than mdf) base was installed.
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Old 12-14-2016, 10:17 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH View Post
Having just installed some new base in a bathroom (replacing mdf trim with real wood) for a customer, I have to say it may not always be the finish carpenter's fault. When the walls and their corners are messed up due to poor framing or sheetrock work (or both) it's pretty tough to lay down a decent baseboard job without the assist of caulk.
Oh, believe me, I know...I just blame the concrete guys. It's always their fault...if they'd just pour a level foundation..jk.
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Old 12-15-2016, 03:50 AM   #30
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Yeah, except in bathrooms where tubs and showers are present. I think it should be code that mdf can't be used as base in those rooms. Maybe even include utility rooms as well.

In the case of the project I'm doing the floors were recently replaced and the floor installers removed all the base but even though it was obviously swollen and paint was chipping off, they simply put it back on without at least discussing some options (ex. - "Should we leave it off so you can get someone to replace it with new stock? We have the names of several guys who can do that for you.") with the HO. Of course, once I painted the walls the deteriorating trim stuck out even more. So, off it came and new wood (well, finger jointed preprimed material - but still better than mdf) base was installed.

Not by much
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Old 12-15-2016, 11:55 AM   #31
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Not by much
I've never been much of a fan of finger jointed trim either but I have to say that this recent batch I worked with was pretty darned good. It was decently primed (to the point that none of the joints were visable, it sanded nicely, took my paint well, and withstood cutting and nailing without any issues. And hopefully it won't have any more problems with exposure to moisture than non-jointed wood trim would.
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Old 12-15-2016, 06:23 PM   #32
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[QUOTE=RH;1330481]I've never been much of a fan of finger jointed trim either but I have to say that this recent batch I worked with was pretty darned good. It was decently primed (to the point that none of the joints were visable, it sanded nicely, took my paint well, and withstood cutting and nailing without any issues. And hopefully it won't have any more problems with exposure to moisture than non-jointed wood trim would.[/QUOTE]

I was going to say, all is well till it gets wet
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Old 12-16-2016, 06:16 PM   #33
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This sounds like cutting corners, not working smarter. What if they're not complaining because they're hiring someone else?
How is a freebie cutting corners
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Old 12-16-2016, 06:41 PM   #34
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@Showtime I'm all for working smarter, not harder. Cutting a huge hole in the tip might get the job done faster, but it's not the correct way to fill a large gap.

If you read the data sheet for 850A it's says gaps should be no more than 1/2" wide or deep. It also says that it's best used in areas of low joint movement and is commonly used for interior applications.


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What's a data sheet and when did I mentioned using it in gaps >1/2"'s Acrylic Latex is used for both indoor and outdoor my man. Does it say that in the "data sheet". If not than Sherwin Williams is wrong and I'm right lol. Anyways, My point is that's its very flexible and I have not had any complaints.

It's important at the initial walk though to "up-sale" by recommending the most efficient and professional way to do something. Of course cutting a piece of material to fit in a gap would be mentioned at the initial walk through. I will simply ask if they would like me to fill it with caulking as a freebie. This approach doesn't get proposed on a bid and is not charged because it voids their 2 Year Warranty. Your missing the whole fact here.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:43 PM   #35
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Quote:
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What's a data sheet and when did I mentioned using it in gaps >1/2"'s Acrylic Latex is used for both indoor and outdoor my man. Does it say that in the "data sheet". If not than Sherwin Williams is wrong and I'm right lol. Anyways, My point is that's its very flexible and I have not had any complaints.



It's important at the initial walk though to "up-sale" by recommending the most efficient and professional way to do something. Of course cutting a piece of material to fit in a gap would be mentioned at the initial walk through. I will simply ask if they would like me to fill it with caulking as a freebie. This approach doesn't get proposed on a bid and is not charged because it voids their 2 Year Warranty. Your missing the whole fact here.


What's a data sheet?

Might want to figure that one out before claiming to be a professional coatings applicator.

The data sheet for the 850a can be found here;

https://www.paintdocs.com/docs/webPD...ype=PDS&lang=E



Interesting that you wouldn't include caulking gaps between trim and walls in your scope of work, but rather include it as a "freebie".

How often do your clients decline that offer and decide the gaps at the top of the base don't need caulked?


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Old 12-17-2016, 03:19 PM   #36
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Is it really free if it costs the customer a 2-year warranty?
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Old 12-17-2016, 03:53 PM   #37
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[quote=chrisn;1330593]
Quote:
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I've never been much of a fan of finger jointed trim either but I have to say that this recent batch I worked with was pretty darned good. It was decently primed (to the point that none of the joints were visable, it sanded nicely, took my paint well, and withstood cutting and nailing without any issues. And hopefully it won't have any more problems with exposure to moisture than non-jointed wood trim would.[/QUOTE]

I was going to say, all is well till it gets wet
Chris, have you actually had issues with finger joined material swelling on you? (Not asking this in a confrontational manner - I really want to know what your expereinces with it have been.)

Installing trim is not exactly my area of expertise but in the cas of this recent job it was pretty straight forward. A although MDF in bathrooms is definitely a no-no in my book, the finger jointed stock I have access to through my local lumber yard seems to be pretty good material. I just figured that since it's real wood then moisture wouldn't be an issue. But, perhaps I am way off base on this (no pun intended).
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:08 PM   #38
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[quote=RH;1331473]
Quote:
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Chris, have you actually had issues with finger joined material swelling on you? (Not asking this in a confrontational manner - I really want to know what your expereinces with it have been.)

Installing trim is not exactly my area of expertise but in the cas of this recent job it was pretty straight forward. A although MDF in bathrooms is definitely a no-no in my book, the finger jointed stock I have access to through my local lumber yard seems to be pretty good material. I just figured that since it's real wood then moisture wouldn't be an issue. But, perhaps I am way off base on this (no pun intended).
Only on exteriors, can's say I have ever seen it inside.
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Old 12-28-2016, 07:03 PM   #39
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The local BM dealer only stocks Tower Tech for the last several years. I have used it before. It takes 4-6 hours before it can be painted, but I generally can leave caulking unpainted until the next day, so I am going to give it a try. Thanks,

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Sounds like a perfect mate for Advance.
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