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Old 05-01-2019, 06:17 AM   #1
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Default Respiratory protection against two part polyurethane

Hi,

Thanks for allowing ne to join the forum!

I will be spraying two part epoxy primer and two part polyurethane paint soon, I'm aware of the toxicity of these products, especially when sprayed, so i was wondering weather anyone can help me with which protection system to buy. These are the 3 options I have been looking at, each with their negatives and positives:

1. A supplied Air mask (from the same compressor as the spray gun), with Air Filter, Air humidifiers, and oil-water separator on a belt.
Doubts: if the compressor is too close, the tank will be contaminated with the airborne toxins, but if it is too far, I'm guessing pressure will suffer immensely, requiring a second compressor (is this correct?). I'm also guessing that a second compressor maybe necessary anyway to maintain constant use of both spray gun and mask.

2. Separate air supplied mask. Using two separate compressors, one from a distance (outside) for the mask and one close by for the spray gun.
Doubts: do I need a specific compressor for breathable, clean air or will a set of filters be enough to purify the air in a normal petrol compressor, if so can anyone recommend any good air filters?

3. Self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Although pricey, I see this as the safest way. I've found various SCBA systems that are affordable (can anyone recommend a good brand?)
Doubts: filling these tanks require specific high pressure compressors, which ive read have to be well maintained to ensure safe breathing air. Of course the other option is filling the tank at a local scuba diving shop, but this would cut my work window down a lot and is generally unhandy. Can anyone recommend an inexpenxlsive tank filling compressor?

I might at that the compressor I'm currently looking at is a 100L 350l/min (around 13CFM) 8Bar compressor.

Thanks in advance!!

Ashley.
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:59 AM   #2
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As you know , it's the polyurethane converter that will expose you the most to the hazardous isocynates. So it's during mixing that you should also where respiratory PPE.

As far as applying the polyurethane once mixed, your respiratory protection needs will be determined by the product exposure limits (Check SDS) and environment controls to reduce exposure, like ventilation.

As far as I know, OSHA requires an inline filtration device that produces a level D air quality. Check out the MSA site for more information.
If you are spraying, or brushing in a well ventilated area, a regular APR with organic cartridges should suffice.


Always check with qualified Health and Safety resources before choosing.
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Old 05-06-2019, 03:12 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AshleyC View Post
Hi,

Thanks for allowing ne to join the forum!

I will be spraying two part epoxy primer and two part polyurethane paint soon, I'm aware of the toxicity of these products, especially when sprayed, so i was wondering weather anyone can help me with which protection system to buy. These are the 3 options I have been looking at, each with their negatives and positives:

1. A supplied Air mask (from the same compressor as the spray gun), with Air Filter, Air humidifiers, and oil-water separator on a belt.
Doubts: if the compressor is too close, the tank will be contaminated with the airborne toxins, but if it is too far, I'm guessing pressure will suffer immensely, requiring a second compressor (is this correct?). I'm also guessing that a second compressor maybe necessary anyway to maintain constant use of both spray gun and mask.

2. Separate air supplied mask. Using two separate compressors, one from a distance (outside) for the mask and one close by for the spray gun.
Doubts: do I need a specific compressor for breathable, clean air or will a set of filters be enough to purify the air in a normal petrol compressor, if so can anyone recommend any good air filters?

3. Self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Although pricey, I see this as the safest way. I've found various SCBA systems that are affordable (can anyone recommend a good brand?)
Doubts: filling these tanks require specific high pressure compressors, which ive read have to be well maintained to ensure safe breathing air. Of course the other option is filling the tank at a local scuba diving shop, but this would cut my work window down a lot and is generally unhandy. Can anyone recommend an inexpenxlsive tank filling compressor?

I might at that the compressor I'm currently looking at is a 100L 350l/min (around 13CFM) 8Bar compressor.

Thanks in advance!!

Ashley.
Hello Ashley,
I would recommend going with your first idea which would be to use a existing compressor for your supplied breathing a paint air. This would boil down to cfm. Typically a hood uses about 10 cfm and a mask would use about 5 cfm. If you are planning on using the same compressor or a different one for the spray gun you can allocate about 15 cfm for the gun itself. there are quite a few compressed air filtering systems out there designed with breathing air in mind. Another thing I want to add is in regards to Grad "D" breathing air. Grade D air needs to be filtered and monitored air. Most of your ambient air systems or self contained PAPR units are not monitoring the air. Just a quick google search should point you in the right direction.
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