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Old 09-20-2019, 01:13 PM   #1
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Default Pressure roller storage overnight?

Thinking about getting an inner fed pressure roller.

Is there a decent way of storing overnight?

I could see storing the spray/roll kinds easily but not sure if just wrapping the inner fed roller with plastic would be sufficient?

If you can't easily store them loaded overnight I don't see how they can save you any time with daily cleanup.

Looking to use it for whole house ceilings/single color where floors are being saved.
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Old 09-20-2019, 10:46 PM   #2
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Didnt know they were supposed to save time on clean up, only application.
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Old 09-21-2019, 01:24 AM   #3
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Didnt know they were supposed to save time on clean up, only application.
If I punctuated it should have read, " I don't know how they are supposed to save you anytime, if you have daily cleanup".

Any application time savings would be negated by daily cleaning. I can spray/ spray&backroll several days in a row with minimal fuss regarding sprayer cleanup. But not every job lends to spraying but some would lend to faster continuous rolling.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:25 PM   #4
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Im sure you could just stick it in a garbage bag at night. Mist a little water in it if you're worried about it.
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Old 09-25-2019, 12:06 PM   #5
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The one job I did using a power roller, I took the cover off the frame, wrapped it, and then purged the paint from line and roller gun. You can store the roller wrapped just fine, but I certainly would not let the gun sit filled with paint over night. About half way through the job I switched to good old bucket screen and old fashioned roller. For as much spraying as I did, the power roller did not strike me as a time saver. Actually being tethered to a sprayer may have slowed me down a bit. The power roller has set unused in my shop since.
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Old 09-25-2019, 04:55 PM   #6
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Working solo doing entire homes primer then same color and doing all the ceilings seems like I can spend time cutting everything thing in then just roll non stop. More important for large ceilings then anything else.

The hardwood floors typically are being protected and saved and the way the projects are scheduled/staged makes spraying and back rolling impractical.

I still might try the $90 one from Depot to make a first hand decision if it's going to work out. The telescoping ones seem more versatile but at double and triple the price I'm not going to pay that unless I know for sure it's saving me time and working for me.
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Old 09-25-2019, 08:53 PM   #7
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If the floor gets covered at all you could prob use a jet roller type set up. Very little to no over spray involved. Whatever bounces off the wall or ceiling gets caught by the roller. Then just wrap your sleeves like normal and leave the pole under pressure.
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Old 09-25-2019, 11:18 PM   #8
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How's the jet rollers workout with finished trim? I typically paint trim first and will mask just the tops to keep roller spatter off and the occasional bump.

I figured the pressure roller would play more in my wheelhouse. I didn't know how well the jet rollers work on ceilings either. Seems like they wouldn't catch much overspray in that orientation.
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:45 AM   #9
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I still say an 18" roller is faster than a power roller. I've only used a power roller once though.
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Old 09-26-2019, 12:05 PM   #10
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Woodco is that referencing commercial or residential?

I often find with wood framing, especially older homes that cheaped out and used 2x3 for most of the interior partition walls, have the wall studs crowned enough or crowned in opposite directions that causes misses and holidays with an 18". My go to is a 14" as it fits between the bellies of 16" oc framing. Lol

If talking about 5/8" rocked commercial work over flat steel studs I probably agree with you although that's a spray and backroll job anyways.
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Old 09-26-2019, 03:16 PM   #11
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18 all day nothing less is the way to roll!!
Production boost making $$


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Old 09-27-2019, 07:28 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sayn3ver View Post
How's the jet rollers workout with finished trim? I typically paint trim first and will mask just the tops to keep roller spatter off and the occasional bump.

I figured the pressure roller would play more in my wheelhouse. I didn't know how well the jet rollers work on ceilings either. Seems like they wouldn't catch much overspray in that orientation.
Yeah, i have never actually used mine on ceilings, I either spray or manually dip and roll. As far as finished trim, if you mask the top edge anyway just run tape and paper instead. You can also stop the spray well short of the bottom of the wall and roll the rest of the way down. Big time saver on walls.
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Old 09-27-2019, 10:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sayn3ver View Post
Woodco is that referencing commercial or residential?

I often find with wood framing, especially older homes that cheaped out and used 2x3 for most of the interior partition walls, have the wall studs crowned enough or crowned in opposite directions that causes misses and holidays with an 18". My go to is a 14" as it fits between the bellies of 16" oc framing. Lol

If talking about 5/8" rocked commercial work over flat steel studs I probably agree with you although that's a spray and backroll job anyways.
I've never had an issue using an 18" in residential with crowned studs, and what not. Not even here in Texas, where work is hack.

Granted, I have been using a 14" more and more. Today, I am going to prime a coup-le large rooms and ceilings with gardz. Im bringing my 18. Also brinmging my 14 in case theres an issue...
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Old 09-27-2019, 11:05 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodco View Post
I've never had an issue using an 18" in residential with crowned studs, and what not. Not even here in Texas, where work is hack.

Granted, I have been using a 14" more and more. Today, I am going to prime a coup-le large rooms and ceilings with gardz. Im bringing my 18. Also brinmging my 14 in case theres an issue...
As you get older, that 9" wil start looking better. As I got older, I noticed the manufactures were increasing the weight of the larger roller covers.
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Old 09-27-2019, 11:22 AM   #15
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I maintained a forty year painting career on the back of a 9" roller. No production problems at all. And anytime production needed to be increased, I always had the handy airless right by my side.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:37 PM   #16
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I primed a home (walls ceilings) with the inner fed power roller. Great for most walls. Ok for ceilings (felt it difficult to manage near the corners).

I probably could use more time to get used to it but like has been said on here, not worth it IMHO.

My issues:

1) couldn't roll the hallway or bath walls. Not enough space with the hose.

2) not as fast in corners or those smaller awkward spaces where I'll occasionally unscrew the pole and run the roller by hand.

By contrast the next day I rolled all ceilings with a 14" and I seemed loads faster.

The 14" by contrast by requires a conscious effort to get ropes/trackmarks. I found the hose tugging on the power roller was causing me to rope with the 9" cover on the lids. Could be I hardly ever wet a 9" cover anymore.

I can see me using the power roller for basement block walls and basement floors.

For commercial walls I could see the power roller shine in situations where overspray dust would be an issue.
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Old 10-09-2019, 10:10 AM   #17
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Quote:
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1) couldn't roll the hallway or bath walls. Not enough space with the hose.
Some lessons just have to be learned through experience. I had the same experience.

It's hard to beat a 1'-2- Sherlock extension pole when rolling confined areas. You wouldn't think that extra foot or two would hep. but it really ups production. Low tech ,but it's a sine qua non.
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:31 PM   #18
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I agreed about the 1-2ft pole and the 2-4ft pole.
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