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Old 11-11-2019, 10:48 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Pete Martin the Painter View Post
My local rental store does rent a scissor lift that can get up stairs and though doors.


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What kind of lift can go upstairs?

I rented a tracked lift and the rental store told me it could go upstairs. Unfortunately they didn't tell me if the arm hits the ground it will trip a safety switch and get stuck there. They tried to charge me $600 for a service call to get it off the stairs.
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Old 11-11-2019, 11:43 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Gracobucks View Post
What kind of lift can go upstairs?

I rented a tracked lift and the rental store told me it could go upstairs. Unfortunately they didn't tell me if the arm hits the ground it will trip a safety switch and get stuck there. They tried to charge me $600 for a service call to get it off the stairs.
If it can't get up those short steps, they need to quit making that claim!
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Old 11-11-2019, 11:49 PM   #23
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gracobucks View Post
What kind of lift can go upstairs?

I rented a tracked lift and the rental store told me it could go upstairs. Unfortunately they didn't tell me if the arm hits the ground it will trip a safety switch and get stuck there. They tried to charge me $600 for a service call to get it off the stairs.
If it can't get up those short steps, they need to quit making that claim!
That's what I told them.
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Old 11-11-2019, 11:51 PM   #24
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What kind of lift can go upstairs?
Well, slinky's will go down stairs, alone...or in pairs.

That lift, not so much
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:01 PM   #25
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Hey there, scissor lifts are awesome, but damn heavy and most cant handle a steep grade safe (like on ramps). If you have an HD truck, rent a trailer as it's cheaper than a delivery. I recently had this issue with a warehouse we were painting.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:30 PM   #26
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I've had lifts that died halfway up a warehouse ramp. That's a pretty good incline but fresher one's would make that trek. Then try and get a weird methhead to push it the rest of the way for you...
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:31 PM   #27
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Well, slinky's will go down stairs, alone...or in pairs.

That lift, not so much
Everyone knows it's slinky!
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Old Yesterday, 01:58 AM   #28
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Everyone knows it's slinky!
Do you mean this?
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Old Yesterday, 08:50 AM   #29
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Glad to hear the OP opted out of using the scissor lift. The concentrated loads @ the wheels on those 2700 # units exert quite a bit of force @ ~ 109 psi.

Id be concerned with the point loads exceeding the capacities of the subflooring as well as the underlying joists or trusses. Id suggest if anyone considers trying something like this to either perform a few calculations first or consult with an engineer.
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Old Yesterday, 08:57 AM   #30
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If I were the homeowner, I wouldn't want 2700 lbs rolling around on my floor, inside the house... is it electric?

Just use scaffolding... a big job can afford to pay someone just to move you around all day.

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Old Yesterday, 09:13 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Glad to hear the OP opted out of using the scissor lift. The concentrated loads @ the wheels on those 2700 # units exert quite a bit of force @ ~ 109 psi.

Id be concerned with the point loads exceeding the capacities of the subflooring as well as the underlying joists or trusses. Id suggest if anyone considers trying something like this to either perform a few calculations first or consult with an engineer.
"Well' mam', the good news is your floor trusses supported the weight of the lift. The bad news is there is a lift resting on its chassis in the middle of your great room. Oh, and there are also four holes the size of lift wheels in your floor"....
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Old Yesterday, 10:12 AM   #32
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"Well' mam', the good news is your floor trusses supported the weight of the lift. The bad news is there is a lift resting on its chassis in the middle of your great room. Oh, and there are also four holes the size of lift wheels in your floor"....
Funny one LB..I had a visual of what you described possibly happening..

I had to relocate a 3000# sliding panel saw/combi unit with four point ground contact onto a joist and beam constructed floor assembly. The rigging company I had hired to move it wouldn’t unless I had an engineer sign off on it. I consulted with a client-architect who was also a structural engineer who calculated the point load capacities, the weight of the unit not flying based on the load concentrations at the 4 contact points. Although it was highly unlikely that the unit would end up crashing through to the basement, it was a potential liability that neither the rigging company or myself was willing to assume, especially with the load exceeding UBC tolerances for residential construction...thinking the lift wouldn’t fly either.
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Old Yesterday, 10:58 AM   #33
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Most codes call for a truss system to be able to carry 40 lbs per square foot. Of course a floor can carry more than 40 pounds on a one square foot area. Otherwise anybody other than a toddler would go crashing through the floor if standing with feet together. The rating is for the truss system, not the floor itself. The trusses work as a system, supporting the entire floor above. A 10' x 10' has an area of 100 sf.....100 x 40 = 4000. A 10 x 10 floor will safely support 4000 pounds of items on the floor if the truss system is designed to support 40 pounds per sf. That's the load the trusses are designed to bear over the entire 10' x 10' area. Other factors such as rating of floor deck and load concentration come into play. A concentrated load in the center of the room is more of a concern than on the perimeter. And a load concentrated in one area more of a concern than a load dispersed over a larger area. Take all of this with a grain of salt, I'm no structural engineer.

I remember once , in the 70's, seeing a ceiling in an older house sagging considerably. The culprit was the waterbed in the room above. The old ones could weigh close to a ton when filled.
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Old Yesterday, 11:20 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Lightningboy65 View Post
Most codes call for a truss system to be able to carry 40 lbs per square foot. Of course a floor can carry more than 40 pounds on a one square foot area. Otherwise anybody other than a toddler would go crashing through the floor if standing with feet together. The rating is for the truss system, not the floor itself. The trusses work as a system, supporting the entire floor above. A 10' x 10' has an area of 100 sf.....100 x 40 = 4000. A 10 x 10 floor will safely support 4000 pounds of items on the floor if the truss system is designed to support 40 pounds per sf. That's the load the trusses are designed to bear over the entire 10' x 10' area. Other factors such as rating of floor deck and load concentration come into play. A concentrated load in the center of the room is more of a concern than on the perimeter. And a load concentrated in one area more of a concern than a load dispersed over a larger area. Take all of this with a grain of salt, I'm no structural engineer.

I remember once , in the 70's, seeing a ceiling in an older house sagging considerably. The culprit was the waterbed in the room above. The old ones could weigh close to a ton when filled.
Theres not only structural considerations with a 2700 # lift...just the truss or joist deflection based on a concentrated load with that type of weight can result in hardwood flooring separating from the subflooring creating a gap resulting in squeaky floor boards. The deflection alone could probably be enough to crack ceramic tile and mortar joints.
In my instance I think I recall the concentration load capacity at the center of the joist span being 318 #, although I could be mistaken.
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Old Yesterday, 08:50 PM   #35
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The scissor lift would only be considered if the floor were slab. I guarantee the house was largely put together with one if that were the case. Otherwise, you'd have to be a moron to drive a scissor lift on a wooden subfloor in a residential dwelling.
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Old Yesterday, 09:05 PM   #36
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The scissor lift would only be considered if the floor were slab. I guarantee the house was largely put together with one if that were the case. Otherwise, you'd have to be a moron to drive a scissor lift on a wooden subfloor in a residential dwelling.
It was determined early in the thread that the floor is not a slab....and yeah, I thought the same thing.
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Old Yesterday, 09:35 PM   #37
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Ballymore makes a lift for interior use. Used one a couple of times. Pretty handy. The problem is finding a rental place that has one.
I used one of their lifts to do a job in a church. The job was detailed work on a gable end interior wall about 30' high. The lift was basically a vertically telescoping bucket with outriggers. No propulsion, you had to push it around. Which for this particular job was OK, as the lift only needed to be moved a couple of times a day due to the time consuming nature of the work. I don't think I would like it for production work. The lift would fit through a standard door opening. The job took about 3 weeks, so the lift was nice as it could be moved out of the way, allowing unobstructed use of the sanctuary.

I see on their website their 19' mini scissors lift has a weight of 1,260 pounds. I'd still be a little uneasy with that much weight running around on a residential floor, but might work. I'd just use scaffold.
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Old Yesterday, 10:23 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Lightningboy65 View Post
I used one of their lifts to do a job in a church. The job was detailed work on a gable end interior wall about 30' high. The lift was basically a vertically telescoping bucket with outriggers. No propulsion, you had to push it around. Which for this particular job was OK, as the lift only needed to be moved a couple of times a day due to the time consuming nature of the work. I don't think I would like it for production work. The lift would fit through a standard door opening. The job took about 3 weeks, so the lift was nice as it could be moved out of the way, allowing unobstructed use of the sanctuary.

I see on their website their 19' mini scissors lift has a weight of 1,260 pounds. I'd still be a little uneasy with that much weight running around on a residential floor, but might work. I'd just use scaffold.
That sounds like those one man lifts that HVAC guys use. I've borrowed them in a pinch wouldn't want to rely on one. I also tried one of those heavy, wooden A-frame, telescoping ladders that sprinkler guys use- scary. Like being on an old pirate ship in a storm. They all seem to sway port and starboard and fore and aft at the same time. A B-I-zitch to move about too.
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Old Yesterday, 10:37 PM   #39
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That sounds like those one man lifts that HVAC guys use. I've borrowed them in a pinch wouldn't want to rely on one. I also tried one of those heavy, wooden A-frame, telescoping ladders that sprinkler guys use- scary. Like being on an old pirate ship in a storm. They all seem to sway port and starboard and fore and aft at the same time. A B-I-zitch to move about too.
That A-frame sounds like the 40' second hand wooden extension ladder I had in the 70's when I was first starting out.
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