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Unread 07-01-2019, 07:12 AM   #1
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Default Pine Tar

I was wondering if anyone here has utilized pine tar as an alternative to stains for treating and coloring exterior wood siding. The product in question can be found at the two following links. Iím looking for review and opinion from anyone that may have used the products or something similar.

https://www.auson.se/en/pine-tar-vitriol

https://www.earthandflax.com/authentic-pine-tar
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Unread 07-01-2019, 08:42 AM   #2
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Back when cross country ski's were made out of wood I used pine tar to seal the bottoms. Not really what you asked but i thought it was funny.
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Unread 07-01-2019, 01:49 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
I was wondering if anyone here has utilized pine tar as an alternative to stains for treating and coloring exterior wood siding. The product in question can be found at the two following links. Iím looking for review and opinion from anyone that may have used the products or something similar.

https://www.auson.se/en/pine-tar-vitriol

https://www.earthandflax.com/authentic-pine-tar
I think of pine tar and I think of baseball and George Brett wanting to kill the umpire for disallowing a home run because he had "too much" pine tar on his bat. And Yadi Molina putting it on his chest protector and looking all over for a dropped ball, not realizing it was stuck to him! I guess this doesn't help! I just thought it'd be sticky as all get out.
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Unread 07-01-2019, 05:31 PM   #4
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I did order some up earlier to play around with and make some mock-ups. At least I know it has other uses in the event it doesnít serve my needs...Iím going to see if I can find the George Brett/Yadi Molina video, the second one sounding pretty hilarious.
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Unread 10-08-2019, 12:56 PM   #5
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I did order some up earlier to play around with and make some mock-ups. At least I know it has other uses in the event it doesnít serve my needs...Iím going to see if I can find the George Brett/Yadi Molina video, the second one sounding pretty hilarious.

Never used it my self but have seen guys make it bushcraft and use it on their remote log homes.
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Unread 10-08-2019, 01:53 PM   #6
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Never used it my self but have seen guys make it bushcraft and use it on their remote log homes.
The stuff wreaks to high holy hell. I had a client wanting to provide some protection and a little gray character to a new Baltic birch outdoor console table, deciding to treat it with iron vitriol followed by the iron vitriol pine tar. When finishing it on my back porch, my neighbor two houses down thought that there was a fire, probing the neighborhood for the source of the charred wood smell. When finished, I ended up transporting the table in the backseat of of my pickup truck, the client insisting on taking me to the emergency room after being overcome by the smell!

I ended up having to chemically extract the pine tar the best I could and sand down the piece, encapsulating it with a couple of coats of 024, 2 coats of alkyd satin, followed by 4 coats of polycarbonate clear...and it still stinks!
The client decided to buy a new table because the smell just won’t go away.

I wouldn’t recommend it, not even for cross county skis!

Last edited by Alchemy Redux; 10-08-2019 at 02:23 PM..
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Unread 10-08-2019, 01:54 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
I did order some up earlier to play around with and make some mock-ups. At least I know it has other uses in the event it doesnít serve my needs...Iím going to see if I can find the George Brett/Yadi Molina video, the second one sounding pretty hilarious.
Pine tar also known as pitch is a great preservative of wood, it's been used for centuries on wooden boats to prevent leaking and rot. https://maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm

A contractor I worked for did a lot of work for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (think sewer system) and they used a similar product, coal tar epoxy on a lot of structural and piping. It looks like a lot of states have been banning its use.
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Unread 10-08-2019, 07:43 PM   #8
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I have seen pine tar (pitch) used on the bottom of new, wood lawn furniture prior to staining. Makes sense, as the bottoms would last longer, but they looked funny, like they were wearing socks.

The person who did this soaked them overnight, and the end grain pulled the pitch into the wood, and sealed the bottoms of the legs.

Not worth the effort, personally.
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Unread 10-09-2019, 09:15 AM   #9
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I originally purchased the pine tar as an architecturally correct finish for siding on Scandinavian themed homes. After doing a bit of research on it, I discovered it has no preservative properties other than water repellency, and was scheduled to be removed from the EU markets as a preservative, having no biocidal or mildewcidal/algicidal properties. It has however been determined that it does preserve the wood to a great degree by repelling water and has since been allowed to remain on the EU market as a preservative. I utilized my clientís table as the sacrificial guinea pig to see how it would perform. Although it did have a nice look to it, the smell was too overwhelming..a definite deal breaker. I could see neighbors putting up a stink over the stink if used for anything other than a ďremoteĒ log cabin as Coco mentioned. Iíve since referred to pine tar as liquid smoke in a can.
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Unread 10-09-2019, 09:20 AM   #10
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Pine tar also known as pitch is a great preservative of wood, it's been used for centuries on wooden boats to prevent leaking and rot. https://maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm

A contractor I worked for did a lot of work for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (think sewer system) and they used a similar product, coal tar epoxy on a lot of structural and piping. It looks like a lot of states have been banning its use.
I've blasted and sprayed plenty of col-tar. Nasty stuff. The dust from abrasive blasting will give you a terrible burning rash.

To me, it smells like creosote. Is that the same smell as pine tar?
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Unread 10-09-2019, 10:51 AM   #11
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I originally purchased the pine tar as an architecturally correct finish for siding on Scandinavian themed homes. After doing a bit of research on it, I discovered it has no preservative properties other than water repellency, and was scheduled to be removed from the EU markets as a preservative, having no biocidal or mildewcidal/algicidal properties. It has however been determined that it does preserve the wood to a great degree by repelling water and has since been allowed to remain on the EU market as a preservative. I utilized my clientís table as the sacrificial guinea pig to see how it would perform. Although it did have a nice look to it, the smell was too overwhelming..a definite deal breaker. I could see neighbors putting up a stink over the stink if used for anything other than a ďremoteĒ log cabin as Coco mentioned. Iíve since referred to pine tar as liquid smoke in a can.

You could probably pretreat the siding with a borate solution.


That cabin I mentioned was someone harvesting the logs and making pine tar on site.
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Unread 10-09-2019, 10:53 AM   #12
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Just ordered some of this stuff to finish this display/end table. What i bought is already mixed with linseed though. Im hoping to sell it at a hippy trade show so im trying to keep it as natural as possible. Sorry if the picture is sidewase.
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Unread 10-09-2019, 12:11 PM   #13
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Just ordered some of this stuff to finish this display/end table. What i bought is already mixed with linseed though. Im hoping to sell it at a hippy trade show so im trying to keep it as natural as possible. Sorry if the picture is sidewase.
Great looking table!

I’ve done quite a bit of live edge finishing, even having done a couple of Nakashima commissions. I utilize raw tung oil cut with mineral spirits, melting grated beeswax into the oil, warming it up in a hot water bath to melt the wax. I saturate & impregnate the wood with the oil-beeswax mix, the beeswax providing UV protection. The tung oil if applying multiple coats provides decent water resistance and doesn’t yellow like linseed oil. The raw tung oil does take a long time to dry..if drying time is a concern I use lightly polymerized tung oil instead..it’s a bit difficult removing the excess wax from the live edge though..

I’ve never used it outdoors as a finish, yet one of my very knowledgeable lifelong career wood finishers who has origins in Argentina has utilized the beeswax & beeswax oil mixtures to protect exterior wood, the technique being pretty common in Argentina...so I’ve been told. I’m wondering how it would work..

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Unread 10-10-2019, 11:37 AM   #14
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Err sideways too... guess i forgot how to spell.

I will have to try the tung and beeswax combo. Im quite familiar with coating things in beeswax and ive got a lot of burl slabs to play with not to mention pallet bricks of beeswax that still smell like the fields they came from.
I am time constrained this time so im gonna stick to the pine tar mix.
The knots in the piece have all been drilled out. They will get orgone energy centers in them and filled with glow in the dark epoxy.
The yellowing is encouraged here since the white pine has a lot of it anyhow.
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Unread 10-10-2019, 07:53 PM   #15
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Err sideways too... guess i forgot how to spell.

I will have to try the tung and beeswax combo. Im quite familiar with coating things in beeswax and ive got a lot of burl slabs to play with not to mention pallet bricks of beeswax that still smell like the fields they came from.
I am time constrained this time so im gonna stick to the pine tar mix.
The knots in the piece have all been drilled out. They will get orgone energy centers in them and filled with glow in the dark epoxy.
The yellowing is encouraged here since the white pine has a lot of it anyhow.

Walnut oil/beewax will also cure out nicely
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