After drywalling, primer or texture first? - Page 2 - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Painting Forum > General Painting Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-22-2010, 11:39 AM   #21
314 255-2201
 
Diversers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: St. Louis, Mo.
Posts: 199
Rewards Points: 150
Thanks: 37
Thanked 59 Times in 35 Posts
View Diversers's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt-sheetrock View Post
Here we go,,, I know I'll get slamed for this,,, but, I can't hepp myself.

As stated in an earlier post,, drywall mud and drywall paper absorb at a TREMENDOUSLY differant rate. Priming will make your TEXTURE stay even, its NOT about the paint, its ALL about the absorbance rate of the texture.

It boils down to this,,, if you want CONSISTANT texture, you must prime first.

And of course you will need to prime (or paint) again, to seal the texture, so that you don't THEN AGAIN end up with an un-equal absorbance rate
point taken i was think about something totally different
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Diversers; 02-22-2010 at 12:04 PM.. Reason: wrong
Diversers is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PaintTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-22-2010, 03:29 PM   #22
guymandude
 
WiseGuys Painting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 74
Rewards Points: 75
Thanks: 4
Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts
View WiseGuys Painting's Photo Album My Photos
Default

[quote=marchboom;15066]I am finishing a basement and the drywall is now up. The instructions on the drywall mud container states to apply a primer to the drywall prior to shooting on the texture coat. When they did the upstairs they (another company) applied the texture coat directly to the drywall, then I primered and painted the walls.

Which way is correct?

usually primer is only required on walls or ceilings where there will be a knockdown texture. the reason for this is the tevture dries much faster on taped/bedded areas leaving you with different sizes o f knockdown texturing. but since you are in basement i would suggest you use a good watersealing primer on the walls and make sure the bottom of wall and base are sealed with primer and caulking or silicone. if you are painting be sure your silicone that is paintable. WiseGuys painting / Texas
WiseGuys Painting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2010, 07:43 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Capt-sheetrock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: NewBern NC
Posts: 971
Rewards Points: 500
Thanks: 389
Thanked 363 Times in 242 Posts
View Capt-sheetrock's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I have been thinking about this today,,,, there are differant kinds of texture.
If its a knock-down, you should deffiantly prime first, or else there is no way you can maintain any consistance on the actual "knocking down"

or textures such as popcorn, don't need priming to maintain their consistancy (assuming you are gonna paint em, some painters don't paint em, and of course at this point, you have opened a whole new can of worms that the painter nor the drywaller will come out good on), however, if your not REALLY good at spraying pop-corn, you will need to prime first to insure that theor are no "bald spots" (places where you can see gray drywall paper. Painting a pop-corn ceiling will "set" the texture and keep it from coming loose, and making it easier to clean and/or re-paint later. Think of it this way, if drywall is left unprimed, it will yellow in no time,,, so will pop-corn, it ii NOT a finished product anymore than drywall mud is

Things like skip-trowel or stomp, don't need to be primed first, they just need to be primed before painting, to again, seal the mud to the same consistancy

Hope this sheds a bit of light
__________________
"When the government becomes destructive of freedom,,it's the right of the people to alter or abolish it",,,,,,,,Thomas Jefferson,,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Who is John Galt ??
Capt-sheetrock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spraying Sand Texture CharlieWis Surface Preparation and Application 9 09-26-2011 11:00 PM
Texture ceilings fcsoldier Surface Preparation and Application 9 11-30-2008 06:15 PM
Texture Equipment superiorceilings General Painting Discussion 2 05-12-2008 10:49 AM
Texture help Rich Surface Preparation and Application 24 02-15-2008 11:20 AM
European Texture FoilEffects Decorative Finishes 9 01-18-2008 02:12 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com