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Old 09-08-2018, 10:59 PM   #1
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Default Anybody 1st coat oil prime 2nd coat latex prime as standard procedure?

Doing some pine window casings that were planed before putting up so first coat of Enamel Undercoater really soaked in and raised the grain, therefore they will need a serious sanding.

I plan on using Advance primer for the second coat because I want to minimize my use of oil primer and I don't really see the benefit of a second coat of oil primer. I will be using Advance semi-gloss for the finish.

So does anybody regularly put a latex primer over an oil primer as standard procedure?

Any redflags?

With all the new water based primer formulations out there I just want be safe.

BTW loving that Advance primer. Sands like a dream and levels like crazy. I use it a lot on baseboards and on the kicks and stringers of stairs. These areas tend to be more beat up than the other trim and also where 1 coat of finish works well.

Last edited by Lakesidex; 09-08-2018 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:20 AM   #2
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I like to use bin on finished cabinets, then spray a latex undercoater on top of that for build. Why not use the advance primer for your first prime? If Im doing raw wood, I just do two coats of the latex undercoater.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:25 AM   #3
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Why not use the advance primer for your first prime? If Im doing raw wood, I just do two coats of the latex undercoater.
Still not confident enough with the waterbase primers on bare wood. I guess I'm just thick and resistant change.

So if the Advance primer is an alkyd, then I would think one of the major difference between that and a true oil is the water delivery of the alkyd resins into the wood, which I believe would mean less penetration; but there has to be more to it than that.

Wish I new more chemistry. And why don't we have any Waterborn Alkyd exterior primers.

With all the phasing out of oil-base products, why aren't the Waterbase Alkyd primers be more widely available and used.

An Exterior Waterbase Alkyd primer seems like a no brainer to me.

There must be some challenges and pitfalls for these products. Just wish I knew what they were.
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Old 09-09-2018, 09:27 AM   #4
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Our standard procedure for painting interior stained trim is wash, sand, oil Prime, sand, wipe and then latex Prime. Coverstain first and then usually S-W multi purpose. Never had any issues with it. Reason for the double prime is all our work is brushed. After sanding the oil primer spots are inevitably sanded off or the primer is thinned down. The multi purpose does a great job at blocking any minor stain that come through and dries slow enough over the oil to flow out but quick enough to avoid dust from sticking to it. The latex primer goes on fast too. In the end it's a 4 coat system but it looks damn good too. It just seems like no matter what we do 1 coat of primer and 2 topcoats doesn't look good. We can still see some color of the stained wood. Our topcoat is usually latex proclassic, latex pre cat, or waterbased urethane. All sw. Throughout the whole process each coat will pass any adhesion test you want. It seems like a lot of work and it is but seeing what our competitors do and what we do it is totally justified. Make sure you charge enough. People who can spot quality work will always notice the extra effort and don't mind paying for it.


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Old 09-09-2018, 09:45 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by jr.sr. painting View Post
Our standard procedure for painting interior stained trim is wash, sand, oil Prime, sand, wipe and then latex Prime. Coverstain first and then usually S-W multi purpose. Never had any issues with it. Reason for the double prime is all our work is brushed. After sanding the oil primer spots are inevitably sanded off or the primer is thinned down. The multi purpose does a great job at blocking any minor stain that come through and dries slow enough over the oil to flow out but quick enough to avoid dust from sticking to it. The latex primer goes on fast too. In the end it's a 4 coat system but it looks damn good too. It just seems like no matter what we do 1 coat of primer and 2 topcoats doesn't look good. We can still see some color of the stained wood.


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This is exactly what I like to do. The finished product looks fantastic. Thanks for confirming the system is sound.
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Old 09-11-2018, 05:56 AM   #6
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Lakesidex, I normally use BM 217 on bare wood and MDF never failed me, than top coat it with 2 coat of Advance no need for latex primer. If I'm repainting stain cabinets I use coverstain oil primer HB.
Hope this help. Dan
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Old 09-11-2018, 06:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jr.sr. painting View Post
Our standard procedure for painting interior stained trim is wash, sand, oil Prime, sand, wipe and then latex Prime. Coverstain first and then usually S-W multi purpose. Never had any issues with it. Reason for the double prime is all our work is brushed. After sanding the oil primer spots are inevitably sanded off or the primer is thinned down. The multi purpose does a great job at blocking any minor stain that come through and dries slow enough over the oil to flow out but quick enough to avoid dust from sticking to it. The latex primer goes on fast too. In the end it's a 4 coat system but it looks damn good too. It just seems like no matter what we do 1 coat of primer and 2 topcoats doesn't look good. We can still see some color of the stained wood. Our topcoat is usually latex proclassic, latex pre cat, or waterbased urethane. All sw. Throughout the whole process each coat will pass any adhesion test you want. It seems like a lot of work and it is but seeing what our competitors do and what we do it is totally justified. Make sure you charge enough. People who can spot quality work will always notice the extra effort and don't mind paying for it.


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I feel like Coverstain is very hard to sand (at least to the point where you’re getting the brush strokes down). Have you tried a different primer? BM217? BIN? Those sand so much more easily that you almost never have any bare spots.

I have no doubt your work looks fantastic; just not sure I see the need for a double priming.
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Old 09-11-2018, 03:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PremierPaintingMa View Post
Lakesidex, I normally use BM 217 on bare wood and MDF never failed me, than top coat it with 2 coat of Advance no need for latex primer. If I'm repainting stain cabinets I use coverstain oil primer HB.
Hope this help. Dan
my understanding is the high hiding coverstain is being taken out in ct. I bought a surplus to stock pile in my garage. apparently it does not meet the voc laws in ct now .
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