Best sprayer for commercial work? - Page 2 - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Painting Forum > General Painting Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-30-2014, 06:16 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Delete this account
Posts: 8,761
Rewards Points: 250
Thanks: 4
Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts
View Epoxy Pro's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oden View Post
Do the math is all
The first two numbers times two is the fan width
12 times 2 is 24. It has a 24 inch fan.
The second two numbers are ur orifice size. What unit is used to measure that I dunno but a 25 is pretty darn open. A 35 would be a block filler tip. A 25 is a really big tip for most paints.

I never used a 1225 but I'd think you could put out a Forrest fire with one. Were the need to arise.
I was laying down when I asked, I didn't want to do math lol.
Epoxy Pro is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Epoxy Pro For This Useful Post:
Gough (05-01-2014)

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PaintTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-30-2014, 06:20 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 914
Rewards Points: 1,392
Thanks: 166
Thanked 526 Times in 328 Posts
View Boco's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by driftweed View Post
I'd knock it out like a champ w/my graco 390 in a cart.

5 p's :

Proper
Planning
Prevents
Poor
Performance

I just bid 30 townhome style units. 4 men 1 week including prep. Get a system or your sprayer wont matter.
I take it you dont own a bigger pump. No offense but My markv will cut spray time in half. Pretty easy just throw a 1025 tip on and go.
Boco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2014, 06:32 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Evansville, Indiana
Posts: 1,589
Rewards Points: 42
Thanks: 34
Thanked 1,066 Times in 595 Posts
View driftweed's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I have no need for anything larger. Unless using multiple guns/ thick material there isnt a justifiable reason in my opinion.

Latex/oil/shellac the 390 will handle those materials.

The O.P. Described doing 40 interior paint jobs. What the heck are you gonna put on the walls? It will more than likely be one of those 3 style paints.
driftweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-30-2014, 07:11 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: East TN
Posts: 4,253
Rewards Points: 14
Thanks: 1,875
Thanked 3,731 Times in 1,918 Posts
View Jmayspaint's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Can you imagine trying to shield with a 1224

I would definitely need a bigger shield.

I ran 390's and 395's for years. They will pretty much keep up with most anything residential.. Just barely sometimes, but adequate. I'm really digging my new 695 though, nice not to have to hear it strain so hard.
Jmayspaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2014, 07:35 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 914
Rewards Points: 1,392
Thanks: 166
Thanked 526 Times in 328 Posts
View Boco's Photo Album My Photos
Default

My 2003 Graco 695 just got repacked for the first time this season. i think it was around 4500 gals before losing any pressure. I still feel it would have lasted longer bur my rock catcher got damaged and It was starving for paint without me realizing it. cant really say anything bad about the 695. Great rig for apartments, houses, and chainstores.
Boco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2014, 10:38 PM   #26
Just getting it done
 
Cutandroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Huntington NY
Posts: 39
Rewards Points: 25
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
View Cutandroll's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boco
My 2003 Graco 695 just got repacked for the first time this season. i think it was around 4500 gals before losing any pressure. I still feel it would have lasted longer bur my rock catcher got damaged and It was starving for paint without me realizing it. cant really say anything bad about the 695. Great rig for apartments, houses, and chainstores.
Wow.
4500gal is big $. Good for you.
Cutandroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2014, 12:27 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
journeymanPainter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Vancouver(surrounding area) BC
Posts: 2,926
Rewards Points: 686
Thanks: 3,276
Thanked 1,655 Times in 1,065 Posts
View journeymanPainter's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boco View Post
My 2003 Graco 695 just got repacked for the first time this season. i think it was around 4500 gals before losing any pressure. I still feel it would have lasted longer bur my rock catcher got damaged and It was starving for paint without me realizing it. cant really say anything bad about the 695. Great rig for apartments, houses, and chainstores.
I've had my 1000+ max for 5 years, haven't had to redo the packings yet, although I need to replace the whole filter manifold.

Sent from my SGH-T989D using Tapatalk
journeymanPainter is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to journeymanPainter For This Useful Post:
Boco (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 01:44 AM   #28
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Intermountain West
Posts: 10,539
Rewards Points: 840
Thanks: 11,620
Thanked 10,458 Times in 5,722 Posts
View Gough's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oden View Post
Do the math is all
The first two numbers times two is the fan width
12 times 2 is 24. It has a 24 inch fan.
The second two numbers are ur orifice size. What unit is used to measure that I dunno but a 25 is pretty darn open. A 35 would be a block filler tip. A 25 is a really big tip for most paints.

I never used a 1225 but I'd think you could put out a Forrest fire with one. Were the need to arise.
Actually, the first number(s) is the number of degrees of the fan, in ten degree increments: a 1225 has a 120 degree fan, a 619 has a 60 degree fan, etc. The painters in the states, Liberia, and Myanmar can figure the approximate fan size (in inches)at 12 inches using that simple trick. Everywhere else in the world, the painters can figure the approximate fan width at 300mm
Gough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2014, 03:23 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
robladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: LVNV
Posts: 1,361
Rewards Points: 712
Thanks: 100
Thanked 798 Times in 499 Posts
View robladd's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gough View Post
Actually, the first number(s) is the number of degrees of the fan, in ten degree increments: a 1225 has a 120 degree fan, a 619 has a 60 degree fan, etc. The painters in the states, Liberia, and Myanmar can figure the approximate fan size (in inches)at 12 inches using that simple trick. Everywhere else in the world, the painters can figure the approximate fan width at 300mm
Painted many parking garages in LV. 2 at Sahara, 2 at Caesars Palace, 1 at Paris, 1 at Planet Hollywood and others.

We started with a 1227 and then switched to the duel nozzle with 2 819's.
120 degree fan compared to a 80 degree fan. Had to move a little faster but saved a good amount from overspray. Those 12"s overspray like a Conventional .

Hot Set Up. GMax 7900 on a Heavy Duty Cart, 42 gallon barrel with an extra foot valve at the bottom to clamp the pickup hose to including strainer. Top of the barrel cut with a 5 gallon bucket also cut to keep the strainer bag suspended at all times. Taker the 5'er lid off and pour.
robladd is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to robladd For This Useful Post:
Gough (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 06:16 AM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,745
Rewards Points: 2,042
Thanks: 1,140
Thanked 3,181 Times in 1,677 Posts
View Oden's Photo Album My Photos
Default

http://www.portlandcompressor.com/ai...ip-sizing.aspx
Oden is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Oden For This Useful Post:
Gough (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 11:18 AM   #31
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Intermountain West
Posts: 10,539
Rewards Points: 840
Thanks: 11,620
Thanked 10,458 Times in 5,722 Posts
View Gough's Photo Album My Photos
Default


"If you multiply it by 2 the result is the approximate fan size when the tip is about 12" from the surface being sprayed"

That's a bit of a happy accident of math that makes it easier to compare fan sizes. It's easier than trying to remember the trigonometry and tangent values.

The last two numbers, the orifice size (in thousands of an inch), doesn't refer to the actual orifice size of the tip. It's an "equivalent orifice size" that relates the flow rate of the elliptical opening of the spray tip to that of a circular opening.

TMI???
Gough is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Gough For This Useful Post:
Jmayspaint (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 11:34 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: East TN
Posts: 4,253
Rewards Points: 14
Thanks: 1,875
Thanked 3,731 Times in 1,918 Posts
View Jmayspaint's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gough

"If you multiply it by 2 the result is the approximate fan size when the tip is about 12" from the surface being sprayed"

That's a bit of a happy accident of math that makes it easier to compare fan sizes. It's easier than trying to remember the trigonometry and tangent values.

The last two numbers, the orifice size (in thousands of an inch), doesn't refer to the actual orifice size of the tip. It's an "equivalent orifice size" that relates the flow rate of the elliptical opening of the spray tip to that of a circular opening.

TMI???

What about the first three numbers before the size? Like a tip might be a 621 515 or whatever.
Jmayspaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2014, 12:02 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
robladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: LVNV
Posts: 1,361
Rewards Points: 712
Thanks: 100
Thanked 798 Times in 499 Posts
View robladd's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
What about the first three numbers before the size? Like a tip might be a 621 515 or whatever.
Here's my TMI 2 cents. The #'s before the size is the type of tip, flat, RAC IV, RAC, V, RAC FF,
RAC X and so on.

How about this the 1227 compared to the double nozzle 819's. 12 full passes
to cover 10 ft at 50% over lap compare to 9 full passes to cover 10 ft at 33% over lap.
robladd is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to robladd For This Useful Post:
Jmayspaint (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 12:31 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: East TN
Posts: 4,253
Rewards Points: 14
Thanks: 1,875
Thanked 3,731 Times in 1,918 Posts
View Jmayspaint's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Ok here's another one while we're getting technical; how do you calculate transfer efficiency?

Would you just go by footage + mil thickness and amount of product used or is there a better way.
Jmayspaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2014, 01:48 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
robladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: LVNV
Posts: 1,361
Rewards Points: 712
Thanks: 100
Thanked 798 Times in 499 Posts
View robladd's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
Ok here's another one while we're getting technical; how do you calculate transfer efficiency?

Would you just go by footage + mil thickness and amount of product used or is there a better way.
Apply paint to manufactures recommended WFT.
Determine actual spread rate compared to manufactures theoretical spread rate.
Divide actual spread rate by manufactures recommended theoretical spread rate to determine your Transfer Efficiency. Also understanding your system will give you a good ballpark figure to start with.
robladd is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to robladd For This Useful Post:
Boco (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 05:26 PM   #36
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,745
Rewards Points: 2,042
Thanks: 1,140
Thanked 3,181 Times in 1,677 Posts
View Oden's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gough
"If you multiply it by 2 the result is the approximate fan size when the tip is about 12" from the surface being sprayed" That's a bit of a happy accident of math that makes it easier to compare fan sizes. It's easier than trying to remember the trigonometry and tangent values. The last two numbers, the orifice size (in thousands of an inch), doesn't refer to the actual orifice size of the tip. It's an "equivalent orifice size" that relates the flow rate of the elliptical opening of the spray tip to that of a circular opening. TMI???
You taught me sum thing actually by ur other post. I'd always wondered why did they complicate it. The timsimg the first number by two thing. I'd decided it was just to complicate for the sake of complicating but here there is a reason behind it. It is a coincidence actually that it is not more complicated than the brains already made it be. Lol
Oden is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Oden For This Useful Post:
Gough (05-01-2014)
Old 05-01-2014, 05:28 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 914
Rewards Points: 1,392
Thanks: 166
Thanked 526 Times in 328 Posts
View Boco's Photo Album My Photos
Default

i try and keep a note book with paints and how much they cover. Always nice to have it around when doing repaints and doing estimates.. Total gallons used into amount of sqft covered. That will get you how mant sqft per gal. That number will be different for each painting company even if using the same product and application. too many variables to consider Roller nap and size , spray tip, user Etc.... Its just something you need to do for yourself.
Boco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2014, 09:41 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
Zoomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,147
Rewards Points: 526
Thanks: 181
Thanked 515 Times in 348 Posts
View Zoomer's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boco View Post
My 2003 Graco 695 just got repacked for the first time this season. i think it was around 4500 gals before losing any pressure. I still feel it would have lasted longer bur my rock catcher got damaged and It was starving for paint without me realizing it. cant really say anything bad about the 695. Great rig for apartments, houses, and chainstores.
Taking care of Blue. Way to go

Sent from my SCH-I435 using PaintTalk.com mobile app
Zoomer is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Zoomer For This Useful Post:
Boco (05-01-2014)
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting Commercial work dubinpainting Commercial and Industrial Painting 16 04-08-2010 11:57 PM
So what is it about commercial work? Msargent Commercial and Industrial Painting 23 03-11-2010 10:46 PM
Commercial Work tedrin General Painting Discussion 3 01-07-2010 10:59 PM
commercial work ccpainting General Painting Discussion 3 12-09-2007 05:02 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com