Making Pine Look Similar to Alder - Page 2 - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
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Old 09-20-2019, 05:40 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Picked them up at the manufacturer in Manhattan, W.D. Lockwood...they don’t have online ordering. I purchased 35 for $158 plus they threw in an additional dozen of their newer colors. It worked out to $3.36 per packet for the 47. I’m “guessing” they probably retail for $4.50 or more purchasing directly from WD.

They charge me roughly $28/#, the pounds coming in metal qt cans. 1# yields 4-8 gallons.

They do blotch on softwoods to some degree but not nearly as much as with pigmented oil stains. For a light color on pine to match Alder they’d likely be fine, eliminating any pre-treatment/conditioning. There are several different methods to condition the wood when using dyes...I’ve only found the need to do that with the oil anilines.

Thanks.
I have used a aniline dye on a few projects in the past, and found it easy to work with, and especially useful for mixing custom tints on the spot.
May raise the gain a bit more than traditional oil based stains.

I seem to get a fair amount of work repairing damaged lacquer around windows, and have used this dye for quick, custom touch-up stains sometimes. The color combinations that can be created are only limited by color mixing ability (ie., color theory and application).
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Old 10-09-2019, 02:14 PM   #22
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I just remembered: Fruitwood. Pine with fruitwood, looks (almost) exactly like Alder with a clear.

fruitwood is another name for cherry. Alder similar look to cherry so no surprise there.
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Old 10-10-2019, 09:59 AM   #23
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Alder is the poor mans cherry when you want the look but not the price.
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Old 10-10-2019, 10:25 AM   #24
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Alder is the poor mans cherry when you want the look but not the price.

We work with a lot of alder here. Benite and Lenmar alkyd stain look really great.
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Old 10-10-2019, 02:58 PM   #25
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Alder is popular here as well. What I don't like is when people choose a really dark stain and hide the real color of the wood. But I only apply.
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Old 10-10-2019, 03:03 PM   #26
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Alder is popular here as well. What I don't like is when people choose a really dark stain and hide the real color of the wood. But I only apply.
There's a fancy restaurant here that has a really expensive species of mahogany but it's stained so heavy it's almost black!
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Old 10-11-2019, 01:46 AM   #27
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There's a fancy restaurant here that has a really expensive species of mahogany but it's stained so heavy it's almost black!
We did a bank addition and when that was finished we completely redid the original bank building, all the trim, I'm talking about five-piece 12" crown molding, four-piece 10" baseboard, all doors, and ornate frames were all solid walnut. We stained them all oriental walnut, which is almost black. It hid almost all of the beauty of the grain, what a fricken waste of money and beautiful wood!
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