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Old 11-19-2014, 08:45 PM   #21
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Saman is water based mud. 3 coats in a day. Dry in 30 mins
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Old 11-19-2014, 08:49 PM   #22
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Use saman. Much better product. Takes no time to dry and is easier to work with.
Hmmm… never even heard of it let alone seen it anywhere.
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Old 11-19-2014, 08:51 PM   #23
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Poly wants a hacker!
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Old 11-19-2014, 09:08 PM   #24
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Looked up their site and kinda confusing The goal Gough that Im trying to achieve is to turn an existing stain and finish which is a golden oak color thats been varnished to a dark like walnut finish is what there leaning towards.Thanks for your help.
I think the Burnt Umber would be the one to use. On detailed/carved/turned work, we apply it with a regular bristle brush, then even it out/soften it with an ox-hair brush.
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Old 11-19-2014, 09:19 PM   #25
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I like the polyshades product (for appropriate jobs-solutions to certain jobs).

I have recolored faded woodwork throughout a living room and kitchen with it, without having to strip or over sand of course. Hvlp'd that job.

Also I just used it on my daughters bed frame that I refinished. I sanded down old finish back to fresh Pine color wood. Tried to match it ballpark to other furniture in the room which had sprayed cherry toner.

I had mahogany stain, and I had cherry stain but neither were the same as what I was going for. So I benited the wood, put two coats of mahogany stain on which was burgundy like in color. Then did cherry stain (actually brown). Would have just cleared it at that point if it was close to what I wanted but it wasn't. So I brush applied a coat of poly shades with an amber/red tone, then brushed a coat of regular clear over that.

Turned out pretty good. Was a lot of oil to stink up the shop though. and after I thought it would be gased out enough I brought it home and it still gased out in our house.
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Old 11-19-2014, 09:24 PM   #26
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Use saman. Much better product. Takes no time to dry and is easier to work with.
To any of you guys just talking stain.... So that would be like glazing over the existing clear with the stain right?? I have done that before, several times, and find it to be doable but very tricky when you have many pieces or want extreme smooth toning appearances.

I have used Saman to glaze over lacquer too on one of my custom door jobs. (1 door, several coats sandwiched in lacquer)
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Old 11-20-2014, 01:13 AM   #27
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I have easy access to Old Masters so that's what I typically use. I think it's a good product.

I've never become a fan of the "multiple steps in one" products. I guess I'm old school enough to still feel there is value in doing things in order and using products that fill a specific role. I don't like the paint and primer in one products either.

I totally agree with this statement.
I am younger but I agree with not using multiple steps in one process.
I would not even tough the stuff because urethaning is a three coat process. And I would think by applying three coats will darken the stain beyond what it is supposed to be to get the proper smoothness needed as the urethene will lift the grain making steel wooling needed to smooth out.
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Old 11-20-2014, 01:21 AM   #28
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I totally agree with this statement.
I am younger but I agree with not using multiple steps in one process.
I would not even tough the stuff because urethaning is a three coat process. And I would think by applying three coats will darken the stain beyond what it is supposed to be to get the proper smoothness needed as the urethene will lift the grain making steel wooling needed to smooth out.
You can do a coat of polyshades after a coat of clear, or before a coat of clear. Polyshades is just like using a store mixed toner except it's poly instead of lacquer, and many people use toners to finish projects.

At least I believe the definition of a toner is color and product in one. So you can either spray, brush, or roll and tip off polyshades with a brush unlike most lacquer toners.
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Old 11-20-2014, 01:48 AM   #29
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You can do a coat of polyshades after a coat of clear, or before a coat of clear. Polyshades is just like using a store mixed toner except it's poly instead of lacquer, and many people use toners to finish projects.

At least I believe the definition of a toner is color and product in one. So you can either spray, brush, or roll and tip off polyshades with a brush unlike most lacquer toners.

Okay, then what happen when, not if you need two to three more coats?
Does the stain absorb deeper causing it to be darker? Or just apply two more coats after steel wooling with normal poly. (deviating from 3 steps in one process)
Whenever I have done finish wood with stain other than natural, I use a stain to the customers choosing then three coats of poly or finish of choice using steel wool in between coats and it comes out smooth as a baby's butt.
I agree with RH, I am old fashioned.
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Old 11-20-2014, 02:16 AM   #30
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Okay, then what happen when, not if you need two to three more coats?
Does the stain absorb deeper causing it to be darker? Or just apply two more coats after steel wooling with normal poly. (deviating from 3 steps in one process)
Whenever I have done finish wood with stain other than natural, I use a stain to the customers choosing then three coats of poly or finish of choice using steel wool in between coats and it comes out smooth as a baby's butt.
I agree with RH, I am old fashioned.
I am having a hard time understanding your question.
I understand your process of stain, and 3 coats of clear coat of choice, steel wool in between. That is very good.
I have only used polyshades like 5 times in 10 years, but keep it as an option of tinted poly. I have also (rarely) tinted my clear coat just putting colorant or stain into clear poly ( I know paint stores say not to do that)
If you brush poly shades over raw wood it can possibly soak into the wood cells unevenly, so I would either wood condition it, or put it on over a coat of clear. If it is put over a stain that should not be an issue though. I just used it a month ago over stain with success, and cleared over it.
I basically use it as a toner, not as a replacement of stain and clear coat.
Toners can create colors and results that stains cannot make for certain projects.
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