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Old 05-04-2008, 11:15 AM   #1
 
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Default Percentage of O & P to add to a bid.

What is a typical Overhead & Profit (O&P) percentage to add to a painting bid? I am negotiating pricing for the complete int. & ext. painting of a new 2800 sq ft house. Thanks for your input.
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Old 05-04-2008, 11:34 AM   #2
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Percentage of profit would be whatever you want it to be, or can get away with.

The percentage of overhead would be exactly that, whatever your overhead is. If you don't know what your overhead is, you can't logically add a percent to cover something that you don't know the number of.
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Old 05-04-2008, 07:19 PM   #3
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O&H is unique to each business, based on your numbers and your goals. As PWG said, it isn't logical to ask others what to add. Either you know your numbers or your don't. If you do, you wouldn't ask the question. Since you did, you better learn your numbers yesterday, or tomorrow you won't be around to ask what went wrong.

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Old 05-05-2008, 12:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeCoburn View Post
What is a typical Overhead & Profit (O&P) percentage to add to a painting bid? I am negotiating pricing for the complete int. & ext. painting of a new 2800 sq ft house. Thanks for your input.

hmmm, "LeeCoburn" ??? I always thought they looked alike - Lee Marvin & James Coburn

I don't got much to add. Just saw the thread and thought I could advise, but PWG and Brian already said what we all know to be true.

If you don't know your numbers yet, start by sharpening your pencil and figuring out all those costs that incur just by running a business. Vehicle expenses, office help (that's YOU if you are a one man shop), phone, insurance, equipment wear and tear, and so on. I have to assume that you are just getting going in the business and don't have these numbers built up for a long period, so all you can do now is take an educated guess.

But as you progress down this path and save all those figures, you can come up with an intelligent determination. And don't worry, you will always be fine tuning.

good luck



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Old 05-07-2008, 08:03 PM   #5
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Default overhead costs

Lee--here's a rudimentary formula. It's quick and dirty, but it's better than nothing.

Take a piece of paper and write down all the monthly payments that you think should be included in your overhead--the business-related payments you have to make whether you work or not. Including insurance, payment on the work van if it is for business only, etc.

Divide the monthly payments by 20 workdays (If that's how many days you work in a month). You can charge the customer that rate for every day you think you'll be on the job.

Some people think 7 percent is a reasonable profit to take home. I find that I usually make less than I intend to, so I add more profit and hope to end up with a reasonable amount.
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Old 05-08-2008, 08:01 AM   #6
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Add 55%
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Old 05-08-2008, 03:21 PM   #7
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Add 55%

Add 55% to what?



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Old 05-08-2008, 04:54 PM   #8
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What is a typical Overhead & Profit (O&P) percentage to add to a painting bid? .

Their you go Scott. With such a broad question, I was really just being a
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Old 05-08-2008, 04:56 PM   #9
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Their you go Scott. With such a broad question, I was really just being a
Thats kinda what I thought. And I agree with the broadness of it.



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