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Old 10-28-2015, 11:07 AM   #1
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Default reducing brush strokes on flat stock trim

I am painting my door casings and baseboards with PPG Glyptex. The material is 1x6 flat stock and I am having problems with brush strokes. I just painted the crown , which is a very large cove style molding , and didn't have this problem . I have added some Penetrol , and am using a Wooster Pro 3" angled sash brush . I have had this problem on other flat trim in the past and have never found a solution . I have used a white china bristle , natural hog hair , etc. , and nothing seems to work. Please share your tips ! Thanks
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Old 10-28-2015, 11:52 AM   #2
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A couple of questions:
Is it wood or pre primed mdf?
Is it properly prepped? Filled, sanded, and primed (oil gives best results imo)and sanded?
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Old 10-28-2015, 12:27 PM   #3
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Isn't Glyptex a waterborne product? I believe it is a hybrid so I'm assuming that you should be using Floetrol instead as an extender.
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Old 10-28-2015, 12:40 PM   #4
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If it is a hybrid or a lo voc alkyd, try using a good chinex bristle. You could be getting fingering from too soft of a brush.
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Old 10-28-2015, 05:37 PM   #5
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If its flat which I am assuming flat stock is but I could be wrong why not get a 1/4 in microfiber mini roller and roll it. It should look almost sprayed.
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Old 10-28-2015, 06:34 PM   #6
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Have you tried a ProForm Blaze brush yet? I've had great success with them for trim work. Another option is using a mohair roller cover for the large open areas.

Beyond that close all the doors to the room you're working in and make sure the HVAC system is turned off. Reducing airflow in the room will help to slow the drying process and help the paint level.


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Old 10-28-2015, 07:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdan
I am painting my door casings and baseboards with PPG Glyptex. The material is 1x6 flat stock and I am having problems with brush strokes. I just painted the crown , which is a very large cove style molding , and didn't have this problem . I have added some Penetrol , and am using a Wooster Pro 3" angled sash brush . I have had this problem on other flat trim in the past and have never found a solution . I have used a white china bristle , natural hog hair , etc. , and nothing seems to work. Please share your tips ! Thanks
I'm not familiar with Glyptex. If you want to minimize brush stokes, then BM Advance Satin is an excellent product choice. It lays out when competently rolled/brushed like its sprayed.
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:06 PM   #8
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Flotrol helps, no doubt. But it sounds like it's an enamel which usually has some sort of built-in levelers, extenders, etc.

Sounds like too thick an application and brush problem to me. In a previous post on another thread, something about show us your brush, or something like that I put out that I like Purdy Syntox. Just for this reason. It's super soft and can feather out brush strokes, yet can used like a brush rather than strictly as a softening brush.

Long story short. Put thin coats on, probably 2 passes. Possibly watered down just a hair to let it flow without being so thick. And like one commenter stated, make sure it's primed good and the primer is sanded to give you a smooth base in which to start.

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Old 10-28-2015, 10:26 PM   #9
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Best guess is that he's painting straight on to preprimed mdf...what a drag. If that's the case, it doesn't matter what he's using ime. It sucks it up too fast.
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilpaintchic View Post
Best guess is that he's painting straight on to preprimed mdf...what a drag. If that's the case, it doesn't matter what he's using ime. It sucks it up too fast.
And I guess that glyptex whatever also comes in oil. Idk, never used it. overworking the product+ stock mdf= brush strokes on trim.
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Old 10-29-2015, 01:42 AM   #11
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It's oil based ,and the trim is wood. It was pre primed but I sanded it with 150 on an orbital sander . I always do 2 light coats ,but it's just not laying down. I'm going to sand it to get the strokes out and try again
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Old 10-29-2015, 03:41 AM   #12
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Ime, pre primed trim (mdf or otherwise)is porous and "grabby"...I always prime in oil (then sand)prior to finish. Best guess, the flatstock is primed with crummy acrylic primer and the crown may be a smoother type of primer. The crown likely has different lighting on it also...
My method is fill, sand,clean,caulk prime,sand,clean,paint. I use a lot of pro classic satin, little flotrol, baby butt smooth every time. I use 4" foam rollers quite a bit also...cut it in and foam roller it out if by hand...2 thin coats. Beyond that, I dunno. I fought the preprimed for a while before I decided that priming it myself was actually easier than not. Ropey finishes drive me nuts...I'm too dang obsessive.lol

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Old 10-29-2015, 04:35 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilpaintchic View Post
Ime, pre primed trim (mdf or otherwise)is porous and "grabby"...I always prime in oil (then sand)prior to finish. Best guess, the flatstock is primed with crummy acrylic primer and the crown may be a smoother type of primer. The crown likely has different lighting on it also...
My method is fill, sand,clean,caulk prime,sand,clean,paint. I use a lot of pro classic satin, little flotrol, baby butt smooth every time. I use 4" foam rollers quite a bit also...cut it in and foam roller it out if by hand...2 thin coats. Beyond that, I dunno. I fought the preprimed for a while before I decided that priming it myself was actually easier than not. Ropey finishes drive me nuts...I'm too dang obsessive.lol
I'm pretty sure the factory primer is solely for dimensional stability while in storage and during shipping. Usually cheap stuff, as you said. For interior trim BM 217 is our go toprimer.
I hate exterior preprimed crap and finger jointed at that. It's no wonder they prime it for stability, it's one step above pulp wood if that. I've seen so much of it chip to bare wood in short order. When we are faced with it, we now sand through the factory primer and oil prime it, in hopes of giving it a better chance.

Somewhere on PT it was written: "Always reprime the preprime"

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Old 10-29-2015, 06:57 AM   #14
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[QUOTE=lilpaintchic;1004425]
My method is fill, sand,clean,caulk prime,sand,clean,paint.
/QUOTE]

Um that method is a bit backwards in my book... I sand clean, prime then caulk,paint.. I have never be able to sand caulk..
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Old 11-01-2015, 12:33 PM   #15
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Why would you need to sand your caulk? If ya did it right and its tight there is no need. Priming over the caulk (ime) starts the build for a nice, tight tape line. It also shows any imperfections that need to be addressed prior to paint. Whatever floats yer boat though...

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Old 11-05-2015, 02:23 PM   #16
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I had this problem a lot with pre-primed trim. Now I sand and apply zinnser guardz, this seals the crappy primer so your finish can flow like butter!
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:50 AM   #17
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Leave it up to the leveling paint.
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Old 11-06-2015, 04:32 PM   #18
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great info everyone!!!
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Old 11-06-2015, 04:38 PM   #19
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[quote=Delta Painting;1004489]
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilpaintchic View Post
My method is fill, sand,clean,caulk prime,sand,clean,paint.
/QUOTE]

Um that method is a bit backwards in my book... I sand clean, prime then caulk,paint.. I have never be able to sand caulk..
Seriously! Am I missing some good advice here? Please explain the advantage of caulking after priming vs. The method I described...I wasn't trying to be defensive, just explaining why I do what I do. If there's a better way, I'm all ears!
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Old 11-06-2015, 05:22 PM   #20
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I prefer to caulk wood or MDF after it has a coat of primer or of paint on it as opposed to bare. Not always the best process overall, for a project, but for the caulking aspect alone-.sure. It goes on easier. It's easier to smooth out, the caulk is. So is putty easier to use on stock that is coated with a paint or a primer as opposed to bare. The problem is of course you caulk and putty after u coat the stock then ur primer and putty is always a coat behind the stock. So? In the big picture it kinda hurts you to prime then caulk and putty.

Best case scenario is getting pre primed to deal with of course. IMO. But. A lot of PT enjoys priming over pre primed stuff.....what u gonna do.
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