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Old 06-28-2015, 01:24 AM   #21
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We've been using the Porter Cable Power Sanders for about 15 yrs. We use 90 grit discs, they are 9" and seem to work well. Still hand sand inside corners, ceiling lines, and base and casing edges. When we first started using them it was tough to convert, hard to change from what we were used to. Now I don't think I could pry the power disc sanders away. In reviewing job costing over the years I know we have increased production times and less wear and tear on the body. Makes sanding drywall patches and repairs easier and faster before the rollout.
Justlooked at the pc power sander and they weight 40lb. That seems pretty heavy.
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Old 06-28-2015, 10:40 AM   #22
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You spray all your wall primer? Wouldn't you spend twice as much on primer?
Yes you would use more primer but not double. Primer is cheap. My labor not so cheap. For quality purposes nothing beats a good spray and backroll on new drywall. Also I don't think PCs weigh 40 pounds.
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:24 AM   #23
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Yes you would use more primer but not double. Primer is cheap. My labor not so cheap. For quality purposes nothing beats a good spray and backroll on new drywall. Also I don't think PCs weigh 40 pounds.

Yeah, materials are always cheaper than labor. Sock it to it as fast as you can, while transfer efficiency is a concern, it's trumped by labor almost every time. Certainly when dealing with cheap materials like drywall primer.

I think the 40 pounds probably includes the vacuum as well. No way the sanding wand weighs that much. The PC's are nice to have. We use it often.
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:40 AM   #24
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Maybe I'm strange, but why would you need to sand freshly primed drywall? If you use the correct primers and backroll, it's not rough.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:13 PM   #25
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Maybe I'm strange, but why would you need to sand freshly primed drywall? If you use the correct primers and backroll, it's not rough.
Scuffing down the primer gives it tooth to bond with next coat. For a level 4 tape job scuffing helps hide the joint banding caused from a smooth joint compound to a paper surface. Using a decent primer goes without saying.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:17 PM   #26
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I'd also add that there is always going to be residual dust from the final sanding of the drywall that will get bonded with the primer creating a rough surface.

At least around here, the drywallers usually do all the priming in my experience. They don't always use the best rollers.
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Old 06-28-2015, 06:59 PM   #27
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Scuffing down the primer gives it tooth to bond with next coat. For a level 4 tape job scuffing helps hide the joint banding caused from a smooth joint compound to a paper surface. Using a decent primer goes without saying.
Okay, but I think you really reaching there. If the transition between mud and paper facing of drywall isn't rough (because the primer was backrolled) pole sanding that transition isn't going to do anything except cause the painter to sweat.
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Old 06-28-2015, 09:33 PM   #28
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Its all fun and games till you get into critical lighting areas with higher sheen paints.
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Old 06-28-2015, 09:58 PM   #29
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[QUOTE=Carl;836794]Maybe I'm strange, but why would you need to sand freshly primed drywall? If you use the correct primers and backroll, it's not rough.[/QUOT
The drywall is always super rough in areas after prime coat, even with a back roll. You have to sand.
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