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Old 04-05-2015, 12:50 AM   #1
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Default Wood sash double hung window finish?

What finish and method would you recommend for new wood sash double hungs? Extra credit for ease!

Personally, when we built our house we went with vinyl (and casement) because I did not want to deal with that headache.
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:07 AM   #2
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What finish and method would you recommend for new wood sash double hungs? Extra credit for ease!

Personally, when we built our house we went with vinyl (and casement) because I did not want to deal with that headache.
Are you asking about the interior or exteriors?

Here's what's worked for us.

Exteriors: solvent-based water repellent preservative; long-oil primer; finish with two coats of acrylic top coat.

Interior: enamel undercoater and alkyd enamel OR hybrid primer and hybrid topcoat.
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Old 04-05-2015, 05:35 AM   #3
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Cannot do wrong with that ^^^
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:42 AM   #4
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We just finished a job with a bunch of unprimed sashes (with gray metal slider tracks to keep clean in between)

We always use coverstain oil (does just as good a job as other primers, only at a fraction of the cost) and it barely raises the grain like a water base primer (easier between coat sanding)

Then just topcoat with your favorite acrylic. We found it was easier and faster to use a 2" angle sash brush. If you get a little paint on the track just use your 5 and 1 and a rag to clean it off. The glass…. if you get a little on there just razor it off after it dries.

At first my guys were taping off the glass and slider tracks and found that the taping was just wasting time.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:45 AM   #5
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One other step that often seems to get missed: remove the excess bedding compound that has oozed onto the glazing. I'll swear that some manufacturers pride themselves on formulations that are nearly impossible to remove. We've had some sash where removing the bedding compound took longer than anything else.

It's easy to see why that step gets skipped, but doing so generally makes the finished product look like crap...IMHO.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:57 AM   #6
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All good tips so far. I might add the following.

We remove the weather strips, rubber bumpers and the white felt piece. This piece makes up the gap the weather strip doesn't cover.

After removing these items, we paint the upper sash, replace the lower sash and paint it.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:57 AM   #7
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One other step that often seems to get missed: remove the excess bedding compound that has oozed onto the glazing. I'll swear that some manufacturers pride themselves on formulations that are nearly impossible to remove. We've had some sash where removing the bedding compound took longer than anything else.

It's easy to see why that step gets skipped, but doing so generally makes the finished product look like crap...IMHO.
I find this a lot on exterior wood doors. Can take a hour or more to remove in some cases depending on how many lights. I have yet to find a better way than razor scraper and utility knife.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:49 PM   #8
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I find this a lot on exterior wood doors. Can take a hour or more to remove in some cases depending on how many lights. I have yet to find a better way than razor scraper and utility knife.
With some brands, a little thinner seems to help. One of our local glass shops suggested Windex, which works in some cases.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:20 PM   #9
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Interior. Apparently she got these windows on the cheap...a contractor ordered the wrong sizes for another job....yeesh.
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Old 04-07-2015, 12:56 AM   #10
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Does anyone stain them anymore? Or has that fallen away from practice?

Is that BM Advance worth a shot on something like this?
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:43 AM   #11
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Does anyone stain them anymore? Or has that fallen away from practice?

Is that BM Advance worth a shot on something like this?
Sorry, we stain them when asked. Since they're mostly pine, we start with a wash coat of dewaxed shellac, sand with #320, stain (Old Masters gel stains are our favorites), and finish with 2-3 coats of solvent-based poly.

Advance primer and topcoat would be a good choice, although we're not seeing the primer sand as well as the 217 Enamel Underbody.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:05 AM   #12
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Quote:
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Sorry, we stain them when asked. Since they're mostly pine, we start with a wash coat of dewaxed shellac, sand with #320, stain (Old Masters gel stains are our favorites), and finish with 2-3 coats of solvent-based poly.

Advance primer and topcoat would be a good choice, although we're not seeing the primer sand as well as the 217 Enamel Underbody.
What do you like about the gel stains? I rarely get a call for interior stain, it's not popular in my market. When I have it's old masters penetrating type. I fear i have gone a bit rusty and need a refresher.
Matter of fact I can't remember the last time I bought stain!
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Old 04-07-2015, 08:31 AM   #13
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I do a lot of staining here! Even the 800+ ft of millwork in my house is stained oak. I'm an Old Masters girl, but I'm more familiar with the penetrating or wiping stain.

Actually, just this past September I did a kitchen cabinet refinish, on oak with Old Masters Penetrating Stain, followed by 4 coats of their waterborne poly. They turned out lovely.

I've used OM gel stain on fiberglass doors. I wasn't fond of the feel of it, but if I used it enough, think I would get used to it. A little seems to go a long way.

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Old 04-07-2015, 08:46 AM   #14
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What do you like about the gel stains? I rarely get a call for interior stain, it's not popular in my market. When I have it's old masters penetrating type. I fear i have gone a bit rusty and need a refresher.
Matter of fact I can't remember the last time I bought stain!
I feel as if we get deeper and more even color, with better control of the finished product.

Before the kits for the fiberglass doors became available, we used a lot of gel stain on them.
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Old 04-07-2015, 04:39 PM   #15
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The Advance Primer isn't a great sander as mentioned (actually, none of the Ben Moore primary lines sand particularly nicely), but the Advance does great on the windows. Advance doesn't need a special primer, so just pick whatever you'd normally use on wood/trim/cabinets/doors that you like.
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