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Old 08-16-2019, 05:13 PM   #1
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Default Work in Progress / Window Restorations Etc

4 done, only 6 to go. I Expect to be doing this most of NEXT summer

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Old 08-16-2019, 08:50 PM   #2
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Ya all seem real impressed. Every one of those windows had to be taken right apart, repaired, the rotted portions hardened and filled with epoxy wood, broken glass and rotten putty replaced and everything painted up to the final coat of finish before reassembling. Touch ups after install. I was rather proud of the job so far. All have been left cracked open to allow cure time. I figure they can be shut in about 10 days to prevent any possibility of tacking to the stool. (It's been very humid!)
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:39 PM   #3
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I know I am impressed, @jennifertemple! That is some gnarly-type work. I've not taken on a job like that in a long time, but, as hard as they can be, they are oh, so satisfying when complete. Job well done!!! Do you want me to e-mail you your GoldStar, lol.
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:49 PM   #4
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Ya all seem real impressed. Every one of those windows had to be taken right apart, repaired, the rotted portions hardened and filled with epoxy wood, broken glass and rotten putty replaced and everything painted up to the final coat of finish before reassembling. Touch ups after install. I was rather proud of the job so far. All have been left cracked open to allow cure time. I figure they can be shut in about 10 days to prevent any possibility of tacking to the stool. (It's been very humid!)

I am impressed, those are so very labor intensive, and a pain in the arse to get to in the first place. I bet many of us would have passed on those (even if our price was agreed to) because of the difficulty factor.
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Old 08-16-2019, 10:43 PM   #5
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I am impressed, those are so very labor intensive, and a pain in the arse to get to in the first place. I bet many of us would have passed on those (even if our price was agreed to) because of the difficulty factor.
It's good to challenge myself from, time to time. I've only worked 3 jobs this summer. That blessed carriage house that needed stripping and 300 muntin bars, these windows and deck and painting some furniture. One really needs to slow down and get a different pace for restoration type work. It goes more slowly than simple painting. On the other hand doing T&M on long and difficult jobs means no risk on a quote and it impresses the heck out of nosy neighbors who like to check out the progress. I've handed out at least a box of business cards.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:09 PM   #6
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It looks nice and I commend you for even tackling such a tough project! One thing though, IMO, that is way too much red trim. There needs to be something different going on besides all that damn red trim.
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:19 AM   #7
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One thing though, IMO, that is way too much red trim. There needs to be something different going on besides all that damn red trim.
I didn't choose the colors. (There are the Green accents.)
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:47 AM   #8
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Sorry, but what green accents are you talking about, not visible in your pic? I don't know what you charged the client, but I've worked with custom carpenters who could replicate any door or window in woods like Mahogony, which if primed and painted properly and maintained, will last for a century.

Did you give them a guarantee, and for how long?
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:19 AM   #9
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I know how you feel Jennifer. We are currently working on 50 storm windows. Luckily for us we can bring them back to our shop to do.
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:30 AM   #10
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Iím impressed. A lot of labor and love goes into giving new life to those old windows. You should be very proud!

I havenít seen an old double-hung putty glazed window since 1990. Most by me have been replaced with newer energy efficient units, some of the newer windows only lasting 15 years before rotting through and through (e.g. Marvin Windows) vs the 200 plus years you can get out of those old windows.

A custom window shop by me still manufactures a true double hung window with sash weights, less the putty glazing on the exterior muntins, fabricated out of mahogany as Brushman4 mentioned. Theyíre getting well in excess of $10,000 for their smallest 12 lite units. Aside from energy efficiency, restoring the old ones makes $$ sense.

Did three pretty large window restoration projects earlier in my career, one taking upwards a year, the house being built in 1805, winning a historic preservation award after being completed. Nearly 35 years later the units still look and function like new, and will probably last another century.

What are you using to remove the putty? I had a bunch of old vintage Fletcher electric putty softeners and replacement parts that belonged to my father. They worked beautifully but I think my sis might have recently listed them on eBay or Craigslist. I would have liked to have kept them, having a bit of emotional attachment. I donít think putty softeners are even manufactured any longer.

Below is a video of a guy using a home made steam oven to soften and remove both the putty and paint which I thought was pretty neat. Super fast method for quick and easy removal.

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Old 08-17-2019, 10:57 AM   #11
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I’m impressed. A lot of labor and love goes into giving new life to those old windows. You should be very proud!

I haven’t seen an old double-hung putty glazed window since 1990. Most by me have been replaced with newer energy efficient units, some of the newer windows only lasting 15 years before rotting through and through (e.g. Marvin Windows) vs the 200 plus years you can get out of those old windows.
Aside from energy efficiency, restoring the old ones makes $$ sense.

What are you using to remove the putty? I had a bunch of old vintage Fletcher electric putty softeners and replacement parts that belonged to my father. They worked beautifully but I think my sis might have recently listed them on eBay or Craigslist. I would have liked to have kept them, having a bit of emotional attachment. I don’t think putty softeners are even manufactured any longer.
The new woods are not as good as the old growth from a 100 years ago. Restored, these old windows will last another hundred. Energy efficiency can be had by putting in INTERIOR storm windows for the winter months. Some of those interior storms are really beautiful, no track required, just accurate window measures and slide into place. I like that one does not need to spoil the integrity of the original framing.

Putty removal has been a sharp chisel and gentle tapping with a small hammer. (Many had already had new glazing. I only had to re-glaze 6 lites, (So Far), that was the only blessing. Oddly, when they re-glazed they just painted over with latex. The paint on that putty just fell away with a light sanding.

$$wise, the restorations are averaging about $700 a window. I don't know what new wood windows cost but I'm dead sure you could not buy and install for less than that and the new ones will not last. I think restoration is the way to go economically and aesthetically! Nothing looks as sad as a century house with new windows.

(These are all single hung except 3 casements, 2attic & 1 bathroom)
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Old 08-17-2019, 11:05 AM   #12
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i know how you feel jennifer. We are currently working on 50 storm windows. Luckily for us we can bring them back to our shop to do.
beautiful!!
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Old 08-17-2019, 11:13 AM   #13
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Sorry, but what green accents are you talking about, not visible in your pic? I don't know what you charged the client, but I've worked with custom carpenters who could replicate any door or window in woods like Mahogony, which if primed and painted properly and maintained, will last for a century.

Did you give them a guarantee, and for how long?


I give 7 years guarantee though I expect much longer ware I don't want to be beholding longer than that.


Green Accents:
Work in Progress / Window Restorations Etc-green-accents.jpg
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:16 PM   #14
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I can appreciate the work that went into restoring those windows. Well done!
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Old 08-17-2019, 01:53 PM   #15
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I give 7 years guarantee though I expect much longer ware I don't want to be beholding longer than that.


Green Accents:
Attachment 104901
Now I see the green, in the original pic at first glance it was hard to notice. I'm not sure I would ever give that 7-year warranty not with the climate in Chicago and I'm guessing where you're at in Canada. Wood hardener and epoxy wood are not likely to last that long much less all of the putty. We used some of that 2 part epoxy wood that cost like $300 a gallon and if I remember correctly we were back in a couple of years redoing things!

Again this is just IMHO.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:01 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Iím impressed. A lot of labor and love goes into giving new life to those old windows. You should be very proud!



I havenít seen an old double-hung putty glazed window since 1990. Most by me have been replaced with newer energy efficient units, some of the newer windows only lasting 15 years before rotting through and through (e.g. Marvin Windows) vs the 200 plus years you can get out of those old windows.



A custom window shop by me still manufactures a true double hung window with sash weights, less the putty glazing on the exterior muntins, fabricated out of mahogany as Brushman4 mentioned. Theyíre getting well in excess of $10,000 for their smallest 12 lite units. Aside from energy efficiency, restoring the old ones makes $$ sense.



Did three pretty large window restoration projects earlier in my career, one taking upwards a year, the house being built in 1805, winning a historic preservation award after being completed. Nearly 35 years later the units still look and function like new, and will probably last another century.



What are you using to remove the putty? I had a bunch of old vintage Fletcher electric putty softeners and replacement parts that belonged to my father. They worked beautifully but I think my sis might have recently listed them on eBay or Craigslist. I would have liked to have kept them, having a bit of emotional attachment. I donít think putty softeners are even manufactured any longer.



Below is a video of a guy using a home made steam oven to soften and remove both the putty and paint which I thought was pretty neat. Super fast method for quick and easy removal.



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=I1bjOENLTQA


That steam box is pretty impressive.
It was kinda hard to watch thinking about all the hours Iíve spent over the years digging out glaze with every tool in the bag. Lol
But most of the time I was working on windows in place, so steam wasnít an option.

Great post.


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Old 08-17-2019, 04:09 PM   #17
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That steam box is pretty impressive.
It was kinda hard to watch thinking about all the hours Iíve spent over the years digging out glaze with every tool in the bag. Lol
But most of the time I was working on windows in place, so steam wasnít an option.

Great post.

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I'm working in place and all that steam is also going into the wood, how long before it is dry enough to paint. I wonder?
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:17 PM   #18
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I'm working in place and all that steam is also going into the wood, how long before it is dry enough to paint. I wonder?


According to the video, the moisture content goes back to normal after about 24 hours.


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Old 08-17-2019, 04:18 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushman4 View Post
Now I see the green, in the original pic at first glance it was hard to notice. I'm not sure I would ever give that 7-year warranty not with the climate in Chicago and I'm guessing where you're at in Canada. Wood hardener and epoxy wood are not likely to last that long much less all of the putty. We used some of that 2 part epoxy wood that cost like $300 a gallon and if I remember correctly we were back in a couple of years redoing things!

Again this is just IMHO.
On the stools I'm using the "Stone Mason" product for wood restoration and the sash corners are getting the Abatron system. I'll see what happens. If it fails I'll cut and fill with actual wood. (I have a lot of old growth timber in storage) Let me hope it makes the 7 year mark! The putty should last! I'm using old fashioned kneadable linseed oil and whiting putty. After all, it did last almost 100 years last time!

Having been warned, I'll avoid warranties on any future wood restorations!
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:47 PM   #20
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That steam box is pretty impressive.
It was kinda hard to watch thinking about all the hours I’ve spent over the years digging out glaze with every tool in the bag. Lol
But most of the time I was working on windows in place, so steam wasn’t an option.

Great post.


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The electric putty softeners are a must-have tool for anyone performing window restorations, that is, if you’re lucky enough to find a used one. You’d likely want to purchase a few of them and stock up on parts and heating elements which often come up on eBay. It would take less than 15 seconds to soften the putty, the removal of which was just as easy as illustrated in the steam box removal, yet could be done in place. Glass breakage due to heat was minimal, although it might pose some concerns if there’s lead paint.

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