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Old 03-04-2016, 06:00 PM   #1
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Default Anti-Graffiti Coating

Hello, I'm a Project Manager for Qualtex Painting in New Braunfels, Texas. I've never posted on a Forum before, but we are in need of some help any way we can get it. We sprayed a Anti-Graffiti coating on tilt wall that we covered in a medium texture. The anti-graffiti coating was applied too thick and left milky patches of product all over the tilt panels. What I need help with is how to remove the anti-graffiti coating without damaging the substrate and without completely destroying the texture coat that we applied. Is sandblasting our only option? I hope not. Has anybody dealt with something like this before. I assume it's similar to over applying a polyurethane on a stain. I probably going to have my guys take hand power tools and grind the coatings down. Is there another option I'm not thinking about? Pressure washing will not work. I'm all ears for any ideas someone can come up with. Please and Thank you!!!
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:35 PM   #2
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Hold long has it been on? It may correct itself if it has time to allow solvent to evaporate. What product was it. What solvent is it thinned with? Was temperature an issue? Souls a solvent wipe help to break film tension?
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:59 PM   #3
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You can blast with walnut shells. That will save your substrate while removing your coating.

I would answer NACEs questions first though
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:49 PM   #4
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First step would be to check the product data sheet. Sometimes these coatings are made to be removable by hot water pressure washing. Some can be recoated after a good sanding.

If it needs to be removed, sandblasting will damage the surface and won't be very effective in removing the coating. It would also be very expensive. You may have to diamond grind, which would be the less destructive removal method but will still scar the surface to a degree.
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Old 03-04-2016, 11:20 PM   #5
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Hey guys..could he be having a surfactant leach issue? Or whatever it's called haha. That looks "milky"
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Old 03-05-2016, 12:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheAnchor View Post
Hey guys..could he be having a surfactant leach issue? Or whatever it's called haha. That looks "milky"
It's called blush. Usually happens when a coating is applied in a high humidity environment. With some coatings, all you need to do to fix it is wipe over it with a retarder, which allows the solvents to escape. Sometimes heating the surface works as well.

Not sure how to fix an anti-graffiti though.
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Old 03-09-2016, 10:31 AM   #7
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Thanks for the help guys! I'm still dealing with this problem. I have a guy quoting me what it will take to sandblast. I've never heard of using walnut shells, sounds interesting. Temperature was not an issue. It was a perfect 70 degree and sunny day. Humidity was probably a little high but not an issue. The product was TexCote Graffiti Gard IV Low Luster. Product data sheet says light sand or using steel wool are acceptable ways to remove the anti-graffiti properties. The manufacture and representatives Ive been dealing with have no clue how to fix this. They said to go straight to sandblasting. The only thing is I have about 8,000 sqft of this to remove and its coated over texture. I still thinking sandblasting is my best option. I'm going to try to wash and wipe with retarders first and then go to the heating method (I'm not sure how I will heat it). I'll see how those options go and let yall know. Thanks again, any other info you may know please pass it my way!! if anybody would like to see pictures email me [email protected]. I don't know how to post pictures on this forum
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Old 03-09-2016, 12:55 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QualtexPainting View Post
Thanks for the help guys! I'm still dealing with this problem. I have a guy quoting me what it will take to sandblast. I've never heard of using walnut shells, sounds interesting. Temperature was not an issue. It was a perfect 70 degree and sunny day. Humidity was probably a little high but not an issue. The product was TexCote Graffiti Gard IV Low Luster. Product data sheet says light sand or using steel wool are acceptable ways to remove the anti-graffiti properties. The manufacture and representatives Ive been dealing with have no clue how to fix this. They said to go straight to sandblasting. The only thing is I have about 8,000 sqft of this to remove and its coated over texture. I still thinking sandblasting is my best option. I'm going to try to wash and wipe with retarders first and then go to the heating method (I'm not sure how I will heat it). I'll see how those options go and let yall know. Thanks again, any other info you may know please pass it my way!! if anybody would like to see pictures email me [email protected]. I don't know how to post pictures on this forum
If you got blush, humidity was an issue.

I don't think a retarder would work in your situation. You could try wiping with whatever thinner that product specifies, but again it's unlikely to work as the product (i'm assuming) is a 2 component and will by now be cured.

The heat option works on wood - that I know for sure. The trick for removing blush from something like a table top would be to wipe with dna and set on fire (seriously). The rapid heat allows the trapped moisture to escape. That said I definitely do not recommend you trying that method on a building haha!! Though a heat gun might be worth trying.

Removing a coating by sandblasting is an expensive process. 8000 sq ft will be absurdly expensive (I used an entire pallet - 50 bags - of crushed glass to remove anti-graffiti from about 600 sq ft of galvanized). And the results will likely not be satisfactory.

You may have no other choice than to grind it off. But try the solvent wipe and heat gun first obviously. Good luck.
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Old 03-09-2016, 01:09 PM   #9
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Was just browsing the TDS for that product when I read the following:

Quote:
Do not over apply film build as excessive
thickness may create milky appearance
through air entrapment.
Solvent wiping will not work. It is a waterborne aliphatic.

Heat will not work.

The coating must be removed.
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Old 03-09-2016, 05:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcon View Post
Was just browsing the TDS for that product when I read the following:



Solvent wiping will not work. It is a waterborne aliphatic.

Heat will not work.

The coating must be removed.
yeah I've been researching all day about it. I read the same thing. Its a non-sacrificial coating. Only way to repair, is to remove completely. Looks like its between diamond grinding or sandblasting.
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Old 03-10-2016, 09:12 PM   #11
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What is the issue with sanding just the problem areas a bit and recover?
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