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Old 04-05-2016, 01:46 PM   #1
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Default Zinc power and epoxy

Has anyone ever heard or done putting zinc power into a 50 50 macropoxy? If so how did it do
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:22 PM   #2
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No..
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:34 PM   #3
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I have never heard of it either but someone told me about it and it got me thinking about how it would work
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:59 PM   #4
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Has anyone ever heard or done putting zinc power into a 50 50 macropoxy? If so how did it do
What are you putting it on?
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:54 PM   #5
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Raw steel
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:55 PM   #6
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What are you putting it on?
Raw steel
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:53 PM   #7
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Calling NACE.
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:59 PM   #8
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There are plenty of nasty zinc primers out there that are meant for bare metal and would do a better job than some thing home made. Factory mix gives a warranty as well.
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Old 04-05-2016, 07:55 PM   #9
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Raw steel
Where is it going?

Zinc is used as a sacrificial element. By adding it to your finish you may cause your finish to prematurely fail.

I would suggest zinc coatings.
@NACE should be able to give your good products and procedures
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:43 PM   #10
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raw steel
atmospheric or immersion service ?


Carbozinc 11 or zinc clad from sherwin williams is a good place to start if you need a zinc coating. It will be important to clean the surface to at least a sspc- sp 6 / nace 3 with at least a 2 mil profile. You will also need a sprayer that has an agitator that can keep the zinc solids suspended while in the pot.
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Old 04-06-2016, 09:57 AM   #11
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atmospheric or immersion service ?


Carbozinc 11 or zinc clad from sherwin williams is a good place to start if you need a zinc coating. It will be important to clean the surface to at least a sspc- sp 6 / nace 3 with at least a 2 mil profile. You will also need a sprayer that has an agitator that can keep the zinc solids suspended while in the pot.
And most likely, it will be an inorganic zinc. It really takes some skill to spray that stuff. I never did get really good at it. But to answer the OP, I don't think adding zinc powder to a generic epoxy is advisable.

Zinc is designed to be applied, by itself, to a properly prepared steel substrate, and is the last line of defense in many barrier coatings, It has the ability to mend itself by oxidation I believe. Mike?
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:12 AM   #12
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And most likely, it will be an inorganic zinc. It really takes some skill to spray that stuff. I never did get really good at it. But to answer the OP, I don't think adding zinc powder to a generic epoxy is advisable.

Zinc is designed to be applied, by itself, to a properly prepared steel substrate, and is the last line of defense in many barrier coatings, It has the ability to mend itself by oxidation I believe. Mike?
Sounds right and yes it can repair itself just like galvanizing. Recent studies have shown the inorganic zinc does not have to be top coated for that very reason and that it actually performs better without a top coat because it will allow oxidation to happen.
Zinc does take some practice to get right. Not enough mils and you get pinpoint rusting. Too much will cause mud cracking. Repairs and recoats may require an organic zinc or an epoxy mastic or you may have to blast the entire area if inorganic needs to be applied because it does not like to stick to itself after curing.
Top coating zinc does not pose any real problems to either coating unless it is applied wrong. Zinc is very porous and has thousands of air bubbles trapped inside of it because it cures so fast wich can cause blisters to form in the coating applied over it unless a mist coat is applied that will let the trapped bubbles to fill or escape if a hot solvent coating is being used such as an epoxy.
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Old 04-06-2016, 08:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mustangmike3789 View Post
atmospheric or immersion service ?


Carbozinc 11 or zinc clad from sherwin williams is a good place to start if you need a zinc coating. It will be important to clean the surface to at least a sspc- sp 6 / nace 3 with at least a 2 mil profile. You will also need a sprayer that has an agitator that can keep the zinc solids suspended while in the pot.
This is exactly the correct recommendation.
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Old 04-08-2016, 09:35 PM   #14
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What has always entertained me is picking up a 2 gallon pail of zinc powder it's so heavy for it's size. Around 118 lbs.
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Old 04-09-2016, 09:55 AM   #15
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What has always entertained me is picking up a 2 gallon pail of zinc powder it's so heavy for it's size. Around 118 lbs.
I know what you mean. I used to hate carrying those squashed metal fives. They may have only been three gallons, but they felt like I was trying to pick up three full fives of paint with one hand!

And all the other stuff that went with spraying inorganic zinc was a PITA. The agitator. The build up of zinc on the air cap. The crappy finish if it was too hot, windy, and in a hard to get area, which for me, always seemed to be around a muddy freeway underpass.
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Old 04-18-2016, 03:12 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mustangmike3789 View Post
atmospheric or immersion service ?


Carbozinc 11 or zinc clad from sherwin williams is a good place to start if you need a zinc coating. It will be important to clean the surface to at least a sspc- sp 6 / nace 3 with at least a 2 mil profile. You will also need a sprayer that has an agitator that can keep the zinc solids suspended while in the pot.
This is exactly the correct recommendation.
No it really isn't.
First of all, I doubt it's immersion service.
Second, why would you suggest a commercial blast and inorganic zinc to someone that is asking about tossing zinc dust in macro? No offense, but I would probably want that person to have something a little more forgiving (organic).
Third, CZ11 calls for a 1 mil profile minimum.

Go with Carbozinc 859 from Carboline or Zinc Clad III HS from S-W. Heck, I'd even say go with an epoxy mastic like carbomastic 15FC or epoxy mastic aluminum ii.

Inorganics have places that they shine, but they are way overspec'd. See above for my case in point.
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Old 04-18-2016, 10:39 PM   #17
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No it really isn't.
First of all, I doubt it's immersion service.
why do you doubt that it could be for immersion service ? I agree that it should not be used for immersion in salt water but it can be used in non potable or deionized water just like metalizing, when aluminum is speced instead of aluminum and zinc mixed in salt water.
Second, why would you suggest a commercial blast and inorganic zinc to someone that is asking about tossing zinc dust in macro?
sp 6 minimum is an acceptable level of cleanliness for some inorganic zinc primers ( zinc clad ii plus & carbozinc 11 in non-immersion). and tossing some zinc dust into a product and playing chemist is not normal acceptable painting practice for anyone.
No offense, but I would probably want that person to have something a little more forgiving (organic).
organic is more forgiving for a less experienced applicator and works just like inorganic when top coated but it will not perform anywhere near the level of inorganic when not top coated because it is an epoxy resin and it will degrade rapidly without a top coat. putting a top coat on inorganic stops / slows its conductivity ( galvanic action)and makes it work more like an organic.
Third, CZ11 calls for a 1 mil profile minimum.
carboizinc 11 calls for a 1 - 3 mil profile with a minimum of sp 6 and zinc clad ii plus calls for a 2 mil profile with a minimum of sp 6 for atmospheric and immersion service. that's why I said 2 mil / sp 6. kind of in the middle and acceptable for both.
Go with Carbozinc 859 from Carboline or Zinc Clad III HS from S-W. Heck, I'd even say go with an epoxy mastic like carbomastic 15FC or epoxy mastic aluminum ii.
when you say " aluminum mastic ii" I'm guessing that you mean, SW epoxy mastic aluminum ii", which is a good product but also requires a top coat or it will degrade rapidly in sunlight and it wasn't part of the original question asked by the OP. carbomastic 15 fc would be a good choice for immersion service since the "FC" is for flake type pigment vs rod shaped pigments and will stack differently and create a better barrier coat for liquid.

Inorganics have places that they shine, but they are way overspec'd. See above for my case in point.
inorganics do have their place but so do organics. organics are easier to work with and are great for maintenance coatings and repairs but they should be top coated to prevent them from degrading in atmospheric conditions. inorganics do not need a top coat and will actually work better without a top coat and they have a higher heat, abrasion and impact resistance than organic zinc.
thanks for your insight and an actual intelligent response vs the last time that you quoted me in (richmond challenge) ... feel free to add your insight there too...but then changed the wording of my quote to satisfy yourself like a disgruntled painter / blaster that thinks that the inspector is there to make your job more difficult and to correct your years of knowledge of application just to milk out some time....
mike
....

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