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Old 10-20-2019, 10:20 AM   #1
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Default Allback linseed oil seminar in Ottawa

I attended a allback linseed oil coarse here in Winnipeg, Manitoba and found it pretty interesting. Canadian government specs this paint for their historic sites. We used it here at the lower fort garry site this winter and this coarse cleared up lots of questions I had when we were using it. They claim this paint will last for 5+ years without maintenance. With maintenance it could last 15+. It is also made with no solvents. They are running another seminar in Ottawa if any one is interested in attending. I do recommend attending.
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Old 10-20-2019, 11:07 AM   #2
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I attended a allback linseed oil coarse here in Winnipeg, Manitoba and found it pretty interesting. Canadian government specs this paint for their historic sites. We used it here at the lower fort garry site this winter and this coarse cleared up lots of questions I had when we were using it. They claim this paint will last for 5+ years without maintenance. With maintenance it could last 15+. It is also made with no solvents. They are running another seminar in Ottawa if any one is interested in attending. I do recommend attending.
I was recently looking into Scandinavian lines including the Allback and Viking linseed oil paints as well as the Auson pine tar. I had tried out the Auson products and am interested in trying out the Allback & Viking Linseed oil paints. I was looking for some professional feedback or reviews on the Allback products am just wondering how they worked out for you.

I included a link below to the east coast distributor.

https://www.earthandflax.com

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Old 10-20-2019, 11:44 AM   #3
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I had a very good experience with it. There were lots of tips and tricks they reviewed at the seminar I wish I knew before taking on the project. This seminar is hosted by Hans and Sonya Allback. They have lots of stories and are willing to share their 40+ years experience with everyone.

The paint does penetrate the wood. It was easy to apply after working with it for a while. They claim it will never flake as its just oil and pigments. We noticed if you had a dull surface, a coat of linseed oil brings back the sheen. They call this maintenance.

The down sides we encounter were the dry times were longer then 24 hours and it was a fine line between a perfect coat and runs. It was costly and if they didn't have it in stock at sage restoration it had to come from Switzerland, which did take awhile.

I would use it again on historical projects and I am thinking of trying it out on decks.
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Old 10-20-2019, 12:06 PM   #4
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I had a very good experience with it. There were lots of tips and tricks they reviewed at the seminar I wish I knew before taking on the project. This seminar is hosted by Hans and Sonya Allback. They have lots of stories and are willing to share their 40+ years experience with everyone.

The paint does penetrate the wood. It was easy to apply after working with it for a while. They claim it will never flake as its just oil and pigments. We noticed if you had a dull surface, a coat of linseed oil brings back the sheen. They call this maintenance.

The down sides we encounter were the dry times were longer then 24 hours and it was a fine line between a perfect coat and runs. It was costly and if they didn't have it in stock at sage restoration it had to come from Switzerland, which did take awhile.

I would use it again on historical projects and I am thinking of trying it out on decks.
I was using a domestically produced solvent-free linseed oil paint from a now defunct regional mom & pop manufacturer and the products held up exceedingly well with ease of application. A couple of the challenges I encountered were wrinkling on subsequent coatings and sheen inconsistencies. If seemed that if the finishes were subjected to a heavy dew or applied in direct sunlight they’d have a tendency to wrinkle, more so than non solvent free oil paints I’ve worked with in the past. Due to the slow drying times, the dew would also result in the finish going dead flat wherever it got wet. I don’t know how conducive the products are when applying them it in a damp coastal environment. Just wondering if you experienced any moisture related difficulties when applying the product.
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Old 10-20-2019, 12:42 PM   #5
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I was using a domestically produced solvent-free linseed oil paint from a now defunct regional mom & pop manufacturer and the products held up exceedingly well with ease of application. A couple of the challenges I encountered were wrinkling on subsequent coatings and sheen inconsistencies. If seemed that if the finishes were subjected to a heavy dew or applied in direct sunlight they’d have a tendency to wrinkle, more so than non solvent free oil paints I’ve worked with in the past. Due to the slow drying times, the dew would also result in the finish going dead flat wherever it got wet. I don’t know how conducive the products are when applying them it in a damp coastal environment. Just wondering if you experienced any moisture related difficulties when applying the product.
I didn't have any moisture issues, but then again everything was hoarded in as we did this project in the middle of winter. We did have problems with the sheen at first but then figured out the wood needs a coat of linseed oil first. Apply a coat of oil, wipe off excess and coat with the paint right away. You could even apply a coat of oil on after to get the gloss back. Allback sells a linseed oil wax that works great for this as well. The only time we had a problem with wrinkles is when the material was applied too thick or applied over a coat that wasn't completely dry. They were easy to cut off with a window scraper and recoated. There are some learning curves but after figuring them out it was easy to work with.
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Old 10-20-2019, 12:47 PM   #6
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Here is a before and after pic of one of the Windows we did
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Old 10-20-2019, 02:50 PM   #7
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Here is a before and after pic of one of the Windows we did
What was used on the siding? It appears to be a fuller bodied paint than I would think a pigment linseed oil would be. Many of the cracks in the siding appear to have been filled by the paint.
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Old 10-20-2019, 03:13 PM   #8
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Here is a before and after pic of one of the Windows we did
What was used on the siding? It appears to be a fuller bodied paint than I would think a pigment linseed oil would be. Many of the cracks in the siding appear to have been filled by the paint.
The siding was whitewash. Mixed with type s hydrated lime, calcium chloride and water. That mixture was used on the log building and all the stucco/stone buildings. Allback linseed oil paint was used on the wood siding.
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Old 10-20-2019, 03:18 PM   #9
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The siding was whitewash. Mixed with type s hydrated lime, calcium chloride and water. That mixture was used on the log building and all the stucco/stone buildings.
My grandfather had commercial greenhouses. I put plenty of the exact same mixture on green greenhouse roofs when I was a kid!
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