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Old 01-31-2020, 05:20 PM   #1
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Hey gang,

I used to wrap up my rollers and take then home to wash out in my bathroom.

Recently I moved to a place on a septic system so I can't really do that anymore. Does anybody have any ideas on some kind of setup I could use at home to continue re using my rollers? Throwing on a new $5 roller to prime a few patches, then tossing it out, drives me insane.

I don't want to wash them in buckets and dump the wastewater on the ground since with repeated use that would be a real problem.

Is there a technique that could be used to separate then paint from wastewater?

Assume this is all acrylic paints.

Thanks!
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Old 02-01-2020, 12:26 AM   #2
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I stopped washing mine years ago. I use to think that it was good to do in order to save money. Then I thought about all of the time I was spending to clean them and all of the paint that I was washing down the drain...so I stopped doing it. I just charge the home owner for them, let them dry out and then toss them. Do not like the waste, but it is better than putting all that paint down the drain.

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Old 02-04-2020, 12:28 AM   #3
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Yes, I see your point. Financially it makes sense for me to wash rollers though, as I do a lot of small jobs (drywall repairs included) so I burn through them fast. Since I'm a one man band I have to keep my costs as low as possible otherwise homeowners would rather just hire a crew of guys for the same price as one guy.

Ultimately I'm hoping to stumble upon a way to wash out rollers in buckets, then separate the solids and dump the water on the ground.
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Old Yesterday, 11:32 AM   #4
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I wash out all my stuff in my backyard. I dug a hole, and slapped a utitity sink on top of it.

I also have a big rubbermaid bin to let stuff like empty buckets dry out in before I throw them in the trash. I try to dump initial paint sludge water in there too, before I wash it out in my sink area. I have a bucket under the drain, that solids kind of drop to the bottom of, so I will pour off the top of that, then pour the sludge in my rubbermaid.

I guess you can minimize your impact by having a bunch of buckets in your backyard, and pour off the top half ,and deal with the sludge on the bottom later.
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Old Yesterday, 09:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanKyle View Post
Yes, I see your point. Financially it makes sense for me to wash rollers though, as I do a lot of small jobs (drywall repairs included) so I burn through them fast. Since I'm a one man band I have to keep my costs as low as possible otherwise homeowners would rather just hire a crew of guys for the same price as one guy.

Ultimately I'm hoping to stumble upon a way to wash out rollers in buckets, then separate the solids and dump the water on the ground.
It's still time vs money though. We're talking $4.00 for a sleeve. If your doing alot of priming for drywall repair, just wrap your roller and use it on the next job..Disposible products should be included in your hourly rate..
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Old Yesterday, 11:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodco View Post
I wash out all my stuff in my backyard. I dug a hole, and slapped a utitity sink on top of it
I was wondering if this kind of thing might be doable
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Old Yesterday, 11:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finishesbykevyn View Post
It's still time vs money though. We're talking $4.00 for a sleeve. If your doing alot of priming for drywall repair, just wrap your roller and use it on the next job..Disposible products should be included in your hourly rate..

Not that I don't tag on some $$ for disposable and consumable supplies on my jobs, but if I don't have to use something for 2 min and toss it out I would prefer not to.
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Old Yesterday, 11:56 PM   #8
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Depending on where you live, the backyard solution can get you in big trouble. Some municipalities will treat it like an EPA Superfund site, even if you're a one man show. If running any sizable shop , definitely not a good idea!
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Old Today, 09:51 AM   #9
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I've been lucky enough to be working where they have a large utility sink so I can spin out the rollers. I don't mind because I feel I'm doing my part of keeping things out of the landfills. However what about the toxicity of the water? How bad is paint for the environment? The spot in my yard where I wash brushes and rollers in the summertime still grows grass. Can I use that as proof it's not terrible and rest easy?
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Old Today, 10:16 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cardgunner View Post
I've been lucky enough to be working where they have a large utility sink so I can spin out the rollers. I don't mind because I feel I'm doing my part of keeping things out of the landfills. However what about the toxicity of the water? How bad is paint for the environment? The spot in my yard where I wash brushes and rollers in the summertime still grows grass. Can I use that as proof it's not terrible and rest easy?
Whether it goes in a backyard or down the drain, or wherever, its still there...

I wouldnt plant a garden on top of my paint hole, though. Very now and then, I take my shovel, and scoop some crap out of it and put in in my garbage.

There are ways to minimize it. Have a three bucket system, and dunk your roller in the first one, and scrape it with a 5 in 1 a few times, spin it into an empty, then dubnk in t another bucket, spin into the empty, till its pretty clean, then just hose it and spin it wherever. Dump the sludge in to a dedicated sludge drying place. Mine is a rubbermaid bin under some plywood.
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Old Today, 10:27 AM   #11
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This is a vexing question....it is many times said "the answer to pollution is dilution". No doubt paint is pollution. The question is, just how harmful is that pollution aspect of most modern day latex house paint. As Woodco said, the grass still grows!

So do we distribute the waste across the landscape in small amounts at various locations(job site disposal), concentrate those chemicals in a relatively small area on our own property, or send them into the municipal sewer system, to eventually end up in a landfill ?

I've done all, and in the end , probably the safest and best solution is to send the stuff down the municipal sewer. Closest thing to a system designed to properly handle such material. Now when you start talking about material more potent than standard latex coatings ....that's a different story.
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Old Today, 10:36 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanKyle View Post
Yes, I see your point. Financially it makes sense for me to wash rollers though, as I do a lot of small jobs (drywall repairs included) so I burn through them fast. Since I'm a one man band I have to keep my costs as low as possible otherwise homeowners would rather just hire a crew of guys for the same price as one guy.

Ultimately I'm hoping to stumble upon a way to wash out rollers in buckets, then separate the solids and dump the water on the ground.
I ran a pretty good sized small shop, and still at times found myself washing covers. Call it what it is, if your're cheap, you're cheap!!! And I am!!

For primer' Id just keep a wrapped roller in the truck and dispose of it when it starts to dry out. You should be able to get at least a month out of such roller. Load it up with primer before wrapping to avoid drying out. A wet roller will keep much longer.
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