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Old 01-24-2018, 05:33 PM   #1
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Default New Member - Issue with Bleed Through on Cabinets

Excited to be a part of Paint Talk! I look forward to reading the forums and gaining more knowledge! I have a question regarding a cabinet painting job I completed about 6 months ago. I got that dreaded text that the original stain was bleeding through. The kitchen cabinets were originally a cherry color and were painted "Dover White" by SW. The process we used was deglossing the cabinets first, lightly sanding, then applying SW Easy Sand Oil Based Primer, sanding again, then applying 2 coats of SW ProClassic Latex In Dover White (lightly sanded again between each coat). The facing of each cabinet actually got 3 coats of enamel. Bleed through is purple and mainly in the detail area of the cabinets (beading, inset). We went through this long process to insure the cabinets were done properly and 6 months later, the original stain is bleeding through. My initial thought is that the oil based primer may have been thinned too much when applied in certain areas OR the primer was sanded too far down. These cabinets were hand painted and hand rolled, not sprayed. What is the best way to resolve the bleed through areas? Should I use an oil based stain blocker (Easy Sand is not a stain blocker just a primer) and then re-apply the latex enamel? My concern is that if I use an oil based primer and thin it down with mineral spirits to make it pliable, that it will also take off the latex enamel that is already there, therefore creating a bigger mess. Need advice on process and products to make sure it's corrected properly. Thank you for your help!
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Old 01-24-2018, 08:20 PM   #2
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Depending on severity, you may need to completely reprep and reprime with a slow dry oil based primer that has actual stain blocking properties, and then top coat again. As you surmised, thinning your primer may have reduced any possible stain blocking properties it had to the point of making it worthless. Not sure there is any easy fix for this but maybe someone will chime in with one.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:04 PM   #3
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BIN is the answer it blocks virtually everything and it dries crazy fast so you can get in and get out.

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Old 01-24-2018, 10:01 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheshorepainting View Post
.....My concern is that if I use an oil based primer and thin it down with mineral spirits to make it pliable, that it will also take off the latex enamel that is already there, therefore creating a bigger mess.....!


No reason to worry about this aspect. Mineral spirits will not affect a cured acrylic film.

If it was me, I would probably hit the bleeding spots with a spray can of Cover Stain, or Bin and repaint.




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Old 01-24-2018, 11:36 PM   #5
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Yup, what they said.

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Old 01-25-2018, 10:58 PM   #6
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I hate to just agree with everyone else but that is exactly what I would do. Two light coats of BIN out of rattle can, put enough to thoroughly hide the stain. Lightly sand and topcoat. May have to do third coat to even things up. Consider using BIN as your primer in similar situations in the future...Might hit SW with a few pics of the failure. The have a white pigmented shellac thats equivalent to BIN and they may comp you a gallon. Do not use the synthetic BIN. Only use white pigmented shellac.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:55 PM   #7
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Thank you all for your responses! I really appreciate the help! I looked up the recommended BIN products. Glad there is the spray can option! Hoping this will do the trick and resolve the issue. Thank you all!
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:24 AM   #8
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Before applying BIN, do I need to lightly sand the bleed through spots first for adherence? Do I need to spray in between coats of BIN and then lightly sand again before applying paint coat? Starting the clean up process today and hoping it goes smoothly!
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:31 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by sheshorepainting View Post
Before applying BIN, do I need to lightly sand the bleed through spots first for adherence? Do I need to spray in between coats of BIN and then lightly sand again before applying paint coat? Starting the clean up process today and hoping it goes smoothly!
I wouldn't sand because you may allow more release of the stain. I would also be inclined to square up all of the cabinets with a stain killing product like BIN, because you may find it will look discolored where you didn't prime.
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:38 PM   #10
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Thank you for the reply! Yes, I was thinking about that too........whether there would be a color difference if the entire cabinet wasn't coated with BIN vs. spot treating once another coat of enamel was applied. Want to get this right so the issue is resolved. Thank you!
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Old 02-09-2018, 04:51 AM   #11
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In my 17 years of painting I hired one guy....usually I only hire females for some reason but I went back to check on this guy's work and he had thinned the damn paint lol...he was making a massive mess on an inset window frame new construction (he told me he had painting experience (clearing throat..(coughcough). Y'all guys stop thinning the paint. I feel sorry for ya because I've had my own nightmare with kitchen cabinets. I sure hope it has worked out for ya
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Old 02-09-2018, 04:58 AM   #12
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And to add I checked on him another time and he was up on scaffolding painting oil on the crown but painting 4," below the crown with oil...luckily the contractor was understanding....he was a slob painter but I corrected him. I am guessing y'all guys believe that thinning paint makes the job quicker. I don't believe it's so unless you use a ****load of tape and a sprayer
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Old 02-09-2018, 09:40 AM   #13
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And to add I checked on him another time and he was up on scaffolding painting oil on the crown but painting 4," below the crown with oil...luckily the contractor was understanding....he was a slob painter but I corrected him. I am guessing y'all guys believe that thinning paint makes the job quicker. I don't believe it's so unless you use a ****load of tape and a sprayer
If I ever have to thin paint, or epoxy coatings, I use the guide lines offered in the TDS (Technical Data Sheet). Because thinner will alter the SBV% (Solids By Volume) and you will have to increase the WFT (Wet Film Thickness) in order to meet the manufacturer's recommended DFT (Dry Film Thickness). And frankly, no one is brushing on more paint when they add more thinner. So what you end up with, is an under developed paint film and compromised performance.

And it's easy to forget that the performance we're supposed to be acheiving as coatings installers, is not necessarily the performance of application, but film development and long term performance of the liquid building material we are applying.
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Last edited by CApainter; 02-09-2018 at 09:46 AM..
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