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Old 08-04-2014, 08:03 AM   #41
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the point of using Spar varnish- which is a long oil varnish- is that it stays flexible, and can move with the wood as the wood expands and contracts. A good spar should not become brittle.
Try Epifanes or Interlux- these are vastly superior to Helmsman and other less expensive brands. ( Epifanes goes for around $125 a gal.)
But definitely first seal the wood with Smith's CPES.
I've used this system and have had finishes last 8 years and longer here in NY.But - the one priviso- you can't just coat it and forget it!
The UV blockers/absorbers in the finish are sacrificial- they degrade over time as they protect the woodwork from the effects of the sun; they must be replenished to continue working.
A simple scuff and recoat when the surface starts to dull or get hazy is what is then needed.
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Old 08-04-2014, 09:41 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
I grabbed some Naval jelly from the shop this morning, think I'll give it a try. Never used it on wood before.

Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on using Oxalic acid on wood that old? Or even just on hardwoods like mahogany? It seems to be most effective on softer woods like cedar. I still think it might be worth a shot, a strong mix and a scrub might help.
Oxylic acid is awesome for removing stains, etc. don't let it sit for too long because it'll turn the door a pinky red. I really liked the brush method of applying it. Keep a hose close by, keep it wet for a good 30-60 mins, then rinse thoroughly.

if I remember correctly it stings a little if you get it on your skin, maybe wear goggles or glasses so you don't get it in your eyes.



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Old 08-04-2014, 11:18 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by journeymanPainter View Post
Oxylic acid is awesome for removing stains, etc. don't let it sit for too long because it'll turn the door a pinky red. I really liked the brush method of applying it. Keep a hose close by, keep it wet for a good 30-60 mins, then rinse thoroughly.

if I remember correctly it stings a little if you get it on your skin, maybe wear goggles or glasses so you don't get it in your eyes.



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Maybe wear goggles?? From the MSDS for Oxalic Acid:

"EYE CONTACT
Immediately flush with plenty of water for up to 15 minutes. Remove any contact lenses and open eyes wide apart. Get medical attention immediately. Continue to rinse."

Goggles seem like a good idea.
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Old 08-04-2014, 11:59 AM   #44
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Yeah, I would hate to get that stuff in my eyes. Its really not too bad to use though, it reacts to wood more than anything else.

Just rinsed the acid off the back door, drying it with a fan. I can already tell it helped with the overall look, minimal improvement on the fastener stains though. The Naval jelly didn't do much, but I was afraid to let it sit on the wood very long.

I'm going to have to stop piddling with this door pretty soon and get some product on. Hope to wash the fronts this afternoon.
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Old 08-04-2014, 08:06 PM   #45
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Maybe wear goggles?? From the MSDS for Oxalic Acid:

"EYE CONTACT
Immediately flush with plenty of water for up to 15 minutes. Remove any contact lenses and open eyes wide apart. Get medical attention immediately. Continue to rinse."

Goggles seem like a good idea.
Goggles are for the weak and lame. Real painters don't need that PPE garbage. We smoke while spaying oil Dryfall thinned with gasoline

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Old 08-05-2014, 09:42 PM   #46
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Goggles are for the weak and lame. Real painters don't need that PPE garbage. We smoke while spaying oil Dryfall thinned with gasoline Sent from my SGH-T989D using PaintTalk.com mobile app
Lol those real painters are 6 feet underground
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Old 08-08-2014, 12:55 PM   #47
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I gotta give props to Gough again for the wood shavings suggestion. Now that I've kinda got the hang of it, I wonder how I ever did not do it. It makes chem stripping so much less messy/gooey.

Compared to the other two, this is regular boring old oak door. Its definitely an antique, but newer looking than either of the other ones. Today could possible be the last day of chemical stripping. I'm ready for that part to be over for sure.
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Old 08-08-2014, 07:43 PM   #48
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My hat is off to you for taking something like this on.

Anything from the 1700's would induce me to recommend they hire a restoration specialist who is familiar with the finishes of that period and how to remove them without negatively affecting the wood.
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Old 08-08-2014, 08:34 PM   #49
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My hat is off to you for taking something like this on.

Anything from the 1700's would induce me to recommend they hire a restoration specialist who is familiar with the finishes of that period and how to remove them without negatively affecting the wood.

I don't think you could harm that wood with a sledge hammer

But seriously, 'restoration' really isn't the right word for what I'm doing. I'm only restoring the front doors in the sense of giving them a face lift and a fresh coating. Trying to preserve them as a functioning door that gets a lot of afternoon sun.

What I found after getting into that front one was that it had already, not too long ago, been coated with Sikkens. And extensive filling had been done on parts of the detail. The owners only bought the place five months ago, an they thought the door was 'ugly' I suppose.

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Old 08-08-2014, 08:58 PM   #50
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Jmays,

You really did a great job prepping that door. I was wondering, in the case of an antique door that requires a natural wood appearance, would it be beneficial to just apply a stain, or stain finish that will have an expectation of a maintenance coat every two to three years, verses applying a film forming coating like a varnish or polyurethane?

Forgive my ignorance when it comes to wood finishing. Not a strong point of mine.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:25 AM   #51
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they thought the door was 'ugly' I suppose.
Anyone that could possibly think those doors are ugly is clearly insane and should be feared from a distance. They are absolutely stunning and you're obviously pretty brave to have taken that project on. I'd be absolutely terrified to even touch those things, much less do anything you've described.

Giving those things the facelift you've described is so far out of my league it's not funny.
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Old 08-10-2014, 10:31 AM   #52
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It has certainly been a challenge. One of the cooler jobs I have had the opportunity to do.

Friday would have been the last day on the front doors, but there was too much humidity for application. We've got it tented to keep rain and sun off of it, but couldn't do anything about the humidity. One more coat and its done. The customer loves it, its more solid looking now (as far as checking) with more exposed wood grain. As it was, the finish was so thick that it almost completely covered the wood.

I'll get some pics soon after we get the tent down.

I might not have taken it on if the scope of work had been different. As it was, I felt confident I could achieve the goals stated. As cool as it was, I'll be glad when its over. Too much time each day wearing a respirator.
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:37 AM   #53
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Thats sweet! The marbling reminds me of some prized shotgun stocks!
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:55 AM   #54
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I've been trying to think of the word for when they cut wood across the grain. I keep wanting to say 'burled' but that's not right.

What is it called when wood is cut like this?
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Old 08-15-2014, 12:07 PM   #55
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I've been trying to think of the word for when they cut wood across the grain. I keep wanting to say 'burled' but that's not right.

What is it called when wood is cut like this?
Quartersawn. The "stripes" are medullary rays.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medullary_ray_(botany)


We actually had a client take us to task for the ray fleck on some new oak door frames. She was convinced that we had messed up and accidentally wiped off all of the stain to make that pattern. I'm still not sure she bought my explanation.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:27 PM   #56
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What an amazing project. The thread made for a good read on timber restoration and trick and tips along the way.
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