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Old 01-02-2020, 11:05 AM   #41
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Bubbles are definitely a problem and solution is doing a skin coat. Literally a really thin coat that seals the wood. The wood will still off gas and you will know where your problems are gonna be after this step.

Per type used, we used tons and found the cheapest one on Amazon was just as good as the best. All of them, thickness of pour has to be maintained. To thick and the endothermic reaction will ruin the material. The biggest problem I had was having completely true surfaces to not have deep areas that created the heat reaction.

I believe the product we used was US Compsites. Started ordering by the dozens of kits.
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Old 01-02-2020, 11:08 AM   #42
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We made a wooden router sled for the Restraunt. For the future I invested in a good Festool router and the Woodpeckers extended slab table.
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Old 01-02-2020, 11:46 AM   #43
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IMO Stonecoat epoxy is the best source simply because of the technical support you get ordering from them.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:01 PM   #44
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We made a wooden router sled for the Restraunt. For the future I invested in a good Festool router and the Woodpeckers extended slab table.
Nice setup. I was kicking around the idea of a router mill a while back but went with a wide drum sander by Woodmaster for surfacing wide slabs instead. It worked out well as long as there wasnt too much twist or cup otherwise Id have to rig up a sled.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:40 PM   #45
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IMO Stonecoat epoxy is the best source simply because of the technical support you get ordering from them.
Have you seen anyone attempt doing their countertop with stonecoat epoxy, and how did it look? I watched a ton of their YouTube videos and wanted to try it on my counters. Looks easy but anything can look that way on the internet.
We updated the entire house when we bought a year ago but haven't touched the black tile counters yet. I figure why not try the stone coat, the plan is to replace anyway but my wife isn't convinced.

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Old 01-02-2020, 04:00 PM   #46
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The Stonecoat honcho (can't recall his name) has a seemingly-boundless enthusiasm for his products and methods, and it's infectious; I must have watched about all of his videos a while back, too. When I once used their stuff for a small bathroom floor, he made himself available by phone, which was unexpected and appreciated. And not every epoxy vendor will send stuff by air, with many of them mistakenly believing that it's subject to hazmat requirements (air shipment was vital to me since I'm in Hawaii.)
*My* problem with potentially doing my own counters would be perfectionism. Coming to it as a relative newb, knowing that for X years, I'd be faced with my defects or questionable color choices - no matter how small - every morning even before getting coffee...well, maybe laminate is a safer choice. Irony is I'd probably be happier paying someone else to do epoxy, even if their technique wasn't up to Sistine Chapel quality.
That said, the bath floor eventually was stunning, but did take 2-3 applications to get an effect I liked. Main problems encountered (and not trumpeted on any of the epoxy-surfacing websites other than in one video I recall) included intolerance to any - ANY - dust or larger particles that might ride the breeze through your workspace during 'to touch' cure time, which is at least a few hours. The cured surface is very reflective, and it's instinctive to check it in reflected light for such defects (see perfectionism reference, above). Wet-sanding/ buffing might have been an option but I had a lot of obstacles to work around that wouldn't have lent themselves to power-buffing on that project.
Floors also have a concern with slipperiness, and the method I chose to deal with this (regrettably) was to topcoat with a floor finish that would offer a bit more friction than the epoxy. That led to innumerable product problems, including more crap in the surface, etc. When I do this again, I will probably wet-sand the epoxy surface to 1000 or 2000 and see how it looks... and feels, when wet, in terms of neck-breaking potential.
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:38 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Rbriggs82 View Post
Have you seen anyone attempt doing their countertop with stonecoat epoxy, and how did it look? I watched a ton of their YouTube videos and wanted to try it on my counters. Looks easy but anything can look that way on the internet.
We updated the entire house when we bought a year ago but haven't touched the black tile counters yet. I figure why not try the stone coat, the plan is to replace anyway but my wife isn't convinced.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

The BM store in great falls does a live demo every Friday with that product. Really cool how they pigment them with generic rattle cans and alcohol.

Last edited by cocomonkeynuts; 01-02-2020 at 04:42 PM..
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:41 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by drybrush View Post
The Stonecoat honcho (can't recall his name) has a seemingly-boundless enthusiasm for his products and methods, and it's infectious; I must have watched about all of his videos a while back, too. When I once used their stuff for a small bathroom floor, he made himself available by phone, which was unexpected and appreciated. And not every epoxy vendor will send stuff by air, with many of them mistakenly believing that it's subject to hazmat requirements (air shipment was vital to me since I'm in Hawaii.)
*My* problem with potentially doing my own counters would be perfectionism. Coming to it as a relative newb, knowing that for X years, I'd be faced with my defects or questionable color choices - no matter how small - every morning even before getting coffee...well, maybe laminate is a safer choice. Irony is I'd probably be happier paying someone else to do epoxy, even if their technique wasn't up to Sistine Chapel quality.
That said, the bath floor eventually was stunning, but did take 2-3 applications to get an effect I liked. Main problems encountered (and not trumpeted on any of the epoxy-surfacing websites other than in one video I recall) included intolerance to any - ANY - dust or larger particles that might ride the breeze through your workspace during 'to touch' cure time, which is at least a few hours. The cured surface is very reflective, and it's instinctive to check it in reflected light for such defects (see perfectionism reference, above). Wet-sanding/ buffing might have been an option but I had a lot of obstacles to work around that wouldn't have lent themselves to power-buffing on that project.
Floors also have a concern with slipperiness, and the method I chose to deal with this (regrettably) was to topcoat with a floor finish that would offer a bit more friction than the epoxy. That led to innumerable product problems, including more crap in the surface, etc. When I do this again, I will probably wet-sand the epoxy surface to 1000 or 2000 and see how it looks... and feels, when wet, in terms of neck-breaking potential.

Don't have a picture but had a customer do their countertop finished like that. Wet sanding to ~2000 grit leaves a dull satin finish. Pretty sure stonecoat has a video on them buffing to a lower sheen too.
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