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Old 02-28-2016, 02:21 PM   #1
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Default ceder shake siding

I was just offered a job. Applying a semi solid color stain that is very light compared to the color now witch is a very dark brown. I know it a 2 step process with the striper and neutralizer. But i was wondering if there were any products someone could recommend tobe used with a power washer. To lighten the color that is currently on there witch is a very dark brown. And the new color is blueridge grey semi solid color stain
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Old 02-28-2016, 05:56 PM   #2
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Do samples first. Stop at SW or BM. Bring your washer, tsp, deck cleaner, deck stripper, and neutralizer. To apply grab a bug sprayer and a stiff brush. Plan on doing a soft wash only and see what works best or if it doesn't even work. Now if it doesn't come off easy then you need to start thinking about a what product is on there now and what style shakes they are. Is it Sikken? Can they be sanded or is a walnut blaster the best option.
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Old 02-28-2016, 08:53 PM   #3
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Default Stripping stains using a Pressure Washer

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Originally Posted by jasepaul View Post
I was just offered a job. Applying a semi solid color stain that is very light compared to the color now witch is a very dark brown. I know it a 2 step process with the striper and neutralizer. But i was wondering if there were any products someone could recommend tobe used with a power washer. To lighten the color that is currently on there witch is a very dark brown. And the new color is blueridge grey semi solid color stain
This is a link a stripper that can actually be downstreamed through your pressure washer. You'll need good PPE though, since it's awful nasty. The success, (or lack thereof), will depend upon what stain is currently on the home, how long the stain has been on the home, and the condition of the wood. If it's a film forming finish, you're gonna have a difficult time no matter what you use. Longer dwells, multiple applications, and sanding to remove some stain could be necessary in that case.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...15339255,d.cGc
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:34 AM   #4
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This is a link a stripper that can actually be downstreamed through your pressure washer. You'll need good PPE though, since it's awful nasty. The success, (or lack thereof), will depend upon what stain is currently on the home, how long the stain has been on the home, and the condition of the wood. If it's a film forming finish, you're gonna have a difficult time no matter what you use. Longer dwells, multiple applications, and sanding to remove some stain could be necessary in that case.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...15339255,d.cGc
How does that one compare to HD80? Ever tried the citralic brightener?
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:07 AM   #5
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Default HD 80 vs Powersolve DSI

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How does that one compare to HD80? Ever tried the citralic brightener?
Great question, but one that I'm probably not qualified to answer. I've only used one batch of Powersolve. From my limited experience, I'd give the advantage to Powersolve, if we're just talking about downstreaming comparisons, product vs product, but keep in mind that downstreaming HD 80 is still fairly new to me, something I've been trying to learn & practice for the last 1-2 years. When I first started using HD80, it was always by direct application, and I didn't even know it could be downstreamed. I didn't think you could effectively dissolve enough of it to make it strong enough, but then I learned about the ability to boost the mix, which can be done with a butyl or a glycol.

Now, if we're talking about comparing Powersolve to a boosted mix of HD80, I'd give the advantage to the boosted HD80, but the thing I'm learning is different mixes work better in different situations. I've also boosted the Powersolve with HD80, which is how I went through the last batch so fast, since I really liked the results. I'll definitely get more Powersolve and continue experimenting with this.

Their citralic is fine, but a bit spendy IMO. I got only one batch when I ordered the Powersolve. I know it's probably ultimately better and safer to not always use oxalic, but I use oxalic for everything when brightening and/or neutralizing. This year I'll probably change to citralic, but I've got about 20 more lbs of oxalic to use up first.
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:33 AM   #6
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Great question, but one that I'm probably not qualified to answer. I've only used one batch of Powersolve. From my limited experience, I'd give the advantage to Powersolve, if we're just talking about downstreaming comparisons, product vs product, but keep in mind that downstreaming HD 80 is still fairly new to me, something I've been trying to learn & practice for the last 1-2 years. When I first started using HD80, it was always by direct application, and I didn't even know it could be downstreamed. I didn't think you could effectively dissolve enough of it to make it strong enough, but then I learned about the ability to boost the mix, which can be done with a butyl or a glycol.

Now, if we're talking about comparing Powersolve to a boosted mix of HD80, I'd give the advantage to the boosted HD80, but the thing I'm learning is different mixes work better in different situations. I've also boosted the Powersolve with HD80, which is how I went through the last batch so fast, since I really liked the results. I'll definitely get more Powersolve and continue experimenting with this.

Their citralic is fine, but a bit spendy IMO. I got only one batch when I ordered the Powersolve. I know it's probably ultimately better and safer to not always use oxalic, but I use oxalic for everything when brightening and/or neutralizing. This year I'll probably change to citralic, but I've got about 20 more lbs of oxalic to use up first.
Thanks. I've not used any of the products we're talking about here. What I'm interested in is learning more about wood restoration and maintenance for stained buildings. My experience is limited to fairly simple projects, decks and such with premix products. What has been a good resource for you to learn about the products and mixing/blending?
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Old 02-29-2016, 11:49 AM   #7
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Default Pressure-Washer Forums

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Thanks. I've not used any of the products we're talking about here. What I'm interested in is learning more about wood restoration and maintenance for stained buildings. My experience is limited to fairly simple projects, decks and such with premix products. What has been a good resource for you to learn about the products and mixing/blending?
These are the links to my favorite pressure-washing forums...the first 4 especially. As always, you have to consider the source, but I have 100% trust in any info given by Ken @ PressurePros. You'll see he's been a well respected member in these forums for many years. Another opinion I hold in the highest regard is Shane Brasseaux, from Wood Savers of Texas. He is a wood restoration jedi. That guy amazes me how he turns out the best results while not over-complicating the process.

I've literally read every thread about pressure-washing on all of these forums below, but was still completely lost when I tried to put it into action. Just like painting, at a certain point, the only way to learn is through trial & error. Some of these boards aren't active anymore. Some are rarely active, since Facebook Groups have really taken off when it comes to all-things pressure washing. I think studying everything below will provide a solid foundation, then joining the FB Groups will keep you updated as to the latest info.

http://community.thegrimescene.com/

http://www.propowerwash.com/board/upload/forum.php

http://www.ptstate.com/forums/forum.php

http://pressurewashingresource.com/top/all

http://www.powerwashnetwork.com/power-washing/

http://www.powerwashcommunity.com/forums/
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:25 PM   #8
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Another place to check out is Iwoodcare. They have everything for downstreaming as well as specialty tools like osbourne brushes, pullers and even media blasters.
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:02 PM   #9
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The easiest test will be to go grab some oven cleaner that contains sodium hydroxide. If that melt the finish to the point that a wooden tongue depressor removes the finish down to bare wood, Powersolve (or HD-80 mixed 6-8 oz per gallon) will work fine via downstreaming. If it doesn't work within 5-10 minutes you may have to apply via X-jet or more direct via a sprayer. Definitely do a test before you commit. If there is a layer of acrylic on there, you may get into a situation of losing your shirt.

Keep in mind, the stronger the stripper, the more fuzzy the wood will get so factor sanding and/or buffing with an Osborne brush.
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