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Old 09-26-2014, 10:19 AM   #21
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I think part of the confusion is created due to location. Manufacturers are dealing with different eco laws in different states and provinces. For example the hybrid waterborne Cover Stain is not available here in British Columbia. I'm still using the oil that is still sold here in gallons etc. That said about 3 years ago the oil went through some kind of viscosity change as if they were messing with the formula. For example if local laws state that the emissions must be lower than a certain level then if they increase the solids in the can the emissions drop below the allowable level. The only problem is you have to add solvent for penetration and workability at the point of application and you end up with higher emissions anyway! With respect to the gate problem: YOu may have a combination of issues. You say these gates are big, needed bleach for excessive mildew (shady area?) and that you rinsed and dried for them 48 hrs. Did you h2o meter them at the bottoms and the joints first? Controlled pressure washing instead might have knocked off loose paint and dead wood fibres giving you a better chance a penetration. If the peeling is on the bare spots the primer did not penetrate where it needed to to withstand shrinkage & expansion and possibly thinning the primer would have helped. I've had lots of problems with fast drying waterborne coatings that tend to "glove" over an old coating instead of "gripping" onto it. It looks fine but down the road you can peel it off in sheets. Benjamin Moore Aura will do that over a smooth surface subject to exp/contr like garage door panels. If the peeling was over multiple old coatings and it did "girp" and not "glove" it then I'm with PremierPainter and his "tension failure" theory. Entire houses have been known to lose multiple coats of old oil after the application of a high quality acrylic. I was working with a paint company last year and the owner of it was painting his own 70 year old house. When the sun came over the top in the afternoon he watched in horror as the green siding started to swell up into basketball sized bubbles. Then it hit his newly painted black ship plank front door. It stripped it down to the bare wood in a couple of hours. Because it was his own house he had company logo signs all over the lawn and all his company trucks in front! they got pulled pretty quick!
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Old 09-26-2014, 03:01 PM   #22
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One thing I think some of us forget is the age of the wood to begin with. Building materials now are all new growth designed to grow bigger and faster. This leads to a number of problems with not only tanin bleed but pitch, sap, lignin etc. bleeding for years after installation until it finally dries out. Of course we don't let it dry out and leave it exposed for those years, it would rot too fast.
As breathable as the best latex primer/paint is, it still traps moisture to some degree and prolongs the "drying peroid" of the wood. It's a cross we must all bear until everything is made out of plastic.
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Old 09-27-2014, 12:49 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang View Post
Water based CoverStain =
Yes cover stain is oil based. I've never seen a latex version.

Cover stain is for covering water and mold damage. Latex will be pointless to cover water and mold. As mold cultivates in water, hence water based being a no no. Oil will prohibit mold growth exponentially better.
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Old 09-27-2014, 04:06 PM   #24
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Default Coverstain Varieties

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintEmUp View Post
Yes cover stain is oil based. I've never seen a latex version.

Cover stain is for covering water and mold damage. Latex will be pointless to cover water and mold. As mold cultivates in water, hence water based being a no no. Oil will prohibit mold growth exponentially better.
Hi PaintEmUP. To set the record straight Coverstain currently is sold in 4 varieties. 3 are oil based and all 3 have different TDS sheets. Apparently Zinnser does not recommend thinning any of them. News to me.... They also have a water based version. All 4 versions have very similar labels. You can see them all at this link. http://www.rustoleum.com/en/product-...primer-sealers

With respect to your comment about oil paints being better than latex as mold inhibitors: It's my understanding and experience mildew and other spores can thrive just fine in alkyds. The difference is if the paint has mildewcide in it or not. Mildewcide is expensive so it is usually found in quality paints in quantities of less than 2%/vol. Because of the small amount it is sometimes not listed as an ingredient. The interesting fact about mildewcides is that some people are very sensitive to THEM. Instead of it benefiting certain people by reducing the presence of mildew it can CAUSE them health problems similar to the ones caused by the mold it is supposed to suppress. (From The Homeowner's Guide To Mold by Michael Pugliese) For exterior products mildewcides are designed to leach out of the paint and do their job until they eventually wear off allowing midew to grow. Another reason why selling a customer on 2 coats is always a good idea.
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