Fiberglass Door - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Professional Painters > Surface Preparation and Application

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-16-2009, 05:16 PM   #1
Member
 
OraarO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 97
Rewards Points: 75
Thanks: 81
Thanked 31 Times in 19 Posts
View OraarO's Photo Album My Photos
Default Fiberglass Door

I have never encountered a fiberglass door that I haven't painted. The current customer has one (new, unfinished) that they would like to have match the new trim in the remodeled area we are working in.

Problem is, the trim is going to be clear varnished pine, and the fiberglass door is already darker than the pine around it.

Is there any way to "stain" it lighter to match clear pine?

If you know, I would be greatful for your insight, thanks.

Last edited by OraarO; 12-16-2009 at 07:24 PM..
OraarO is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PaintTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-16-2009, 05:19 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,257
Rewards Points: 1,076
Thanks: 1,564
Thanked 1,311 Times in 724 Posts
View Rcon's Photo Album My Photos
Default

You can't stain it lighter if the substrate is darker. You would have to paint. (Or solid color clear, like poly or varnish)
Rcon is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rcon For This Useful Post:
OraarO (12-16-2009)
Old 12-16-2009, 05:32 PM   #3
.
 
Workaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Huntsville Alabama
Posts: 17,818
Rewards Points: 2,486
Thanks: 6,245
Thanked 6,705 Times in 4,460 Posts
View Workaholic's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Yep hard to make something lighter than it naturally is without painting it. You could do as Rcon suggested and try a solid clear
I guess returning the door for the proper color is out?
Workaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-16-2009, 05:39 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
aaron61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: clearwater,fl
Posts: 6,326
Rewards Points: 2,030
Thanks: 3,034
Thanked 4,211 Times in 2,057 Posts
View aaron61's Photo Album My Photos
Default

It's called "Faux" Basically paint the base color back to a lighter color...to match wood tone. Then grain it to match.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
aaron61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 05:59 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,257
Rewards Points: 1,076
Thanks: 1,564
Thanked 1,311 Times in 724 Posts
View Rcon's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron61 View Post
It's called "Faux" Basically paint the base color back to a lighter color...to match wood tone. Then grain it to match.
That would also work. Just make sure you're charging appropriately. This kind of work effectively doubles your time and triples your material costs - so naturally you have to double+ your price.

I think you'll find with homeowners/GC's they'd rather paint a lighter color than pony up the extra expense.
Rcon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 06:03 PM   #6
.
 
Workaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Huntsville Alabama
Posts: 17,818
Rewards Points: 2,486
Thanks: 6,245
Thanked 6,705 Times in 4,460 Posts
View Workaholic's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron61 View Post
It's called "Faux" Basically paint the base color back to a lighter color...to match wood tone. Then grain it to match.
I was going to mention something similar but figured as Rcon did that most of the time the budget does not cover this kind T&M.
Workaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 07:22 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
aaron61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: clearwater,fl
Posts: 6,326
Rewards Points: 2,030
Thanks: 3,034
Thanked 4,211 Times in 2,057 Posts
View aaron61's Photo Album My Photos
Default

The only difference between this and doing a gel stain is getting a lighter starting color...couple of coats of paint shouldn't up the price that much.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
aaron61 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to aaron61 For This Useful Post:
OraarO (12-16-2009)
Old 12-16-2009, 07:28 PM   #8
Member
 
OraarO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 97
Rewards Points: 75
Thanks: 81
Thanked 31 Times in 19 Posts
View OraarO's Photo Album My Photos
Default

This is pretty much what I figured.
Thanks.

Having never grained a door before (and this one has the grain grooved into it anyway) I don't think I'll recommend that.

I think either staining it a rich color, or painting to match the accent wall opposite the door would work.

And painting it the same as the wall it is on would work too, obviously.

I'll try to upload a picture and link to it if I can figure out how to....
OraarO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 07:37 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
aaron61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: clearwater,fl
Posts: 6,326
Rewards Points: 2,030
Thanks: 3,034
Thanked 4,211 Times in 2,057 Posts
View aaron61's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Gel Staining is easy Bro...More money & They will love it!!!
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
aaron61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 07:38 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,257
Rewards Points: 1,076
Thanks: 1,564
Thanked 1,311 Times in 724 Posts
View Rcon's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron61 View Post
The only difference between this and doing a gel stain is getting a lighter starting color...couple of coats of paint shouldn't up the price that much.
Don't you put anything over your stain?

I would think a finishing schedule for a faux job like that would be 2 base coats of a light color (1st product), gel stain overtop (2n'd product), sealer (third product), clear topcoats (fourth product).

Depending on dry times - i'll assume poly:

1 day on base coats with quick dry tinted poly (4 hrs)
1 day on gel stain (1 hour)
1 day on sealer and 1st topcoat (3 hours, or 2 trips same day @ 1.5 hours)
1 day on final topcoat. (1.5 hours)

Total: 9.5 hours
4 products

As opposed to:

a) 2 coats of paint - 1 day (3 hours w. dry time)
b) 2 coats quick dry tinted poly - (4 hours w. dry time)

total: 3-4 hours
1 product

Or;

Gel stain (1 hour)
Return second day and apply 2 poly topcoats (3 hours)

Total: 4 hours
2 products

I think there is a big difference!

Last edited by Rcon; 12-16-2009 at 07:48 PM.. Reason: fixing discrepancy
Rcon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 07:50 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
aaron61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: clearwater,fl
Posts: 6,326
Rewards Points: 2,030
Thanks: 3,034
Thanked 4,211 Times in 2,057 Posts
View aaron61's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcon View Post
Don't you put anything over your stain?

I would think a finishing schedule for a faux job like that would be 2 base coats of a light color (1st product), gel stain overtop (2n'd product), sealer (third product), clear topcoats (fourth product).

Depending on dry times - i'll assume poly:

1 day on base coats with quick dry tinted poly (4 hrs)
1 day on gel stain (1 hour)
1 day on sealer and 1st topcoat (3 hours, or 2 trips same day @ 1.5 hours)
1 day on final topcoat. (1.5 hours)

Total: 9.5 hours
4 products

As opposed to:

a) 2 coats of paint - 1 day (3 hours w. dry time)
b) 2 coats quick dry tinted poly - (4 hours w. dry time)

total: 3-4 hours
1 product

Or;

Gel stain (1 hour)
Return second day and apply 2 poly topcoats (3 hours)

Total: 4 hours
2 products

I think there is a big difference!
You are only adding the step of getting the door to a lighter base color...maybe 2 hrs & a quart of paint.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
aaron61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2009, 10:13 PM   #12
Logistics
 
jack pauhl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 3,090
Rewards Points: 2,100
Thanks: 334
Thanked 852 Times in 605 Posts
View jack pauhl's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Here are a few products worth looking into to make things go smooth. The dried undercoat finish is kinda important. Too flat is not good, too glossy is bad news.

Just recently discussed fiberglass doors here on PaintTalk

A graining base is an oil primer-like option for fiberglass doors. It will give you a nice eggshell-like finish to allow you to move stain around and have working time to do it. Too flat of finish minimizes your working time. Too glossy turns into a nightmare and offers not much of anything for your solid stain to bite into.

Personally I think gel stains (as a whole) as the least of my options for fiberglass doors. I prefer ZAR solid oils for this kind of work. Plenty of working time and IF you should screw up, grab some thinner and rags and wipe it off and start over. The graining base allows you to do that.

Your best bet as someone else suggested is to take your color deck and match a color as close to the color of the trim you are matching. Stay on the lighter side if in question, you can always make things darker with the ZAR stain. Mix various ZAR colors together to get a perfect match and a TIP using ZAR is to sample it on the door (with rag and thinner handy) so that you can comfortably apply the stain and achieve the depth of color desired.

Should you find your stain on the dark side of the match, then try working the stain off your brush further. You can thin ZAR a bit but only do that as a last resort to lighten a match.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by jack pauhl; 12-16-2009 at 10:16 PM.. Reason: standard procedure
jack pauhl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2009, 08:37 AM   #13
Member
 
OraarO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 97
Rewards Points: 75
Thanks: 81
Thanked 31 Times in 19 Posts
View OraarO's Photo Album My Photos
Default

....

Last edited by OraarO; 12-17-2009 at 08:41 AM.. Reason: Can't link to uploaded photos
OraarO is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Staining a fiberglass door... PaintProfessor Surface Preparation and Application 22 03-14-2010 07:35 PM
Fiberglass? door from Lowes Jeld-Wen Reliabilt paint with what? madducks Surface Preparation and Application 14 11-10-2009 09:31 AM
Painting a fiberglass door Rich Surface Preparation and Application 8 06-14-2009 12:34 PM
Fiberglass Door Issue NuView Painting General Painting Discussion 22 02-15-2009 02:19 PM
painting fiberglass exterior door A Man For All Reason General Painting Discussion 2 09-10-2008 12:52 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com