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Old 05-10-2011, 04:49 PM   #1
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Default Glazing or woodfiller?

Had a little fight on the job site today, New construction all the trim is up and we are going around caulking and filling nail holes. One guy thought we should fill all the nail holes with glazing which I like because you don't have to go back and sand it, and the other guy thought we should use wood-filler which actually does a nice job but then you have an extra step. Any recommendations, what do you use Glazing or filler?
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Old 05-10-2011, 04:58 PM   #2
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Using glazing compound always unless there is some larger common nail sets or screws, but for all finish nail sets it has always been glazing for over 35 years for myself and my father before me. I have NEVER had a problem or a complaint. It makes me crazy to watch guys smear in wood filler and then sand it smooth-to each his own.
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Old 05-10-2011, 05:54 PM   #3
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Filler for me. I worked for an old school painter that used to glaze everything and the filled and sanded holes are better. Less visible today and less likely to become visible over time.
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Old 05-10-2011, 06:02 PM   #4
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Glazing mixed with some drywall dust (or baby powder). Know a few companies that swore by it and like it myself as well. If it's to sticky smush it against some cardboard to get some of the oil out, make a nice ball, and go to town. It's more of a production thing though than a fine finish top of the line putty job I would say. They all have their place.
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Old 05-10-2011, 06:06 PM   #5
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Glazing takes a long time to cure and in my opinion is not ideal for nail filling, though it works and I have used it. DAP actually makes a product that acts a lot like glazing but with a faster dry time, called Painters Putty 53. Still, it wants 24-48 hours before applying paint. Glazing (read the can) wants to have a firm set (can be several days to weeks) before applying an oil-base paint or primer. I think you are doing your customers a disservice if the manufacturers recommendations are not followed.

I like Elmer's wood filler for nail holes inside and out. There is an art to filling the hole and smoothing it over so there is very little if any sanding necessary. It will rewet with dew or rain, but can be coated within 15 minutes with latex or oil. From your post, it seems like you think the wood filler does a nicer job.

But in the end, it's different strokes for different folks (where is he?). 30 years with no complaints is good enough testimony for me, but I like my methods-- they are efficient enough for profit and provide quality, IMO. It's usually not worth arguing about. If you're the boss you tell them how it's going to be done, end of story.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:22 PM   #6
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Nail holes - My personal favorite......DAP Painters Caulk, wiped with a thumb, one pass, and painted so you can still read the finger print! i come across this often in repaints!

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Old 05-10-2011, 09:40 PM   #7
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Glazing? Sheet rock dust? Why not use painters putty like Crawfords, and whiting?

On NC or any new nail holes I would only use filler. Anything else will leave a divit.
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Old 05-10-2011, 10:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by straight_lines View Post
Glazing? Sheet rock dust? Why not use painters putty like Crawfords, and whiting?

On NC or any new nail holes I would only use filler. Anything else will leave a divit.
I don't know who the hell came up with the formula man I just did what multiple bosses told me to do. Really though it did work great for THAT type of work (cookie cutters). Fast, smooth, and never had any problems painting it.

Now me personally on my jobs I do not use it. I like to over fill everything and sand it down perfectly smooth. Doesn't take much longer in my opinion.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:45 AM   #9
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Does everyone wait to do the sanding, or is there a way to hit something like the Elmers right away?
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Old 05-11-2011, 05:29 PM   #10
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For finish nails I usually apply with a putty knife and then finish with a finger, eliminating the need for sanding the individual spots. I fill on bare wood, then sand the entire surface to get rid of mill glaze and round sharp edges. That gets rid of any residual filler.

Exterior nail heads are generally bigger and require an overfill and sand. I haven't found a good way to make the filler flush until it dries and can be sanded.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:34 PM   #11
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The now unavailable old school putty used was oil based and looked somewhat like glazing putty does today. I had an old wallpaper guy tell me how to use it (decades ago) to fill small nail holes. You don't drag the putty by the hole, rather you pushed it forward into the hole then drew back your putty knife.

Being it was oil (as glazing compound is) it wouldn't shrink, didn't need sanding and didn't absorb latex.

I think the guy who suggested glazing may have been thinking old school too.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:19 PM   #12
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So do you use the oil based glazing under a latex primer and latex topcoat? Do you ever have any drying issues.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:44 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROOMINADAY
Nail holes - My personal favorite......DAP Painters Caulk, wiped with a thumb, one pass, and painted so you can still read the finger print! i come across this often in repaints!
I like to use sherpatch and a little drywall mud mixed in to thicken the product sands up beauty! I clean fill with fingers on contoured trim!
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Old 05-13-2011, 06:07 PM   #14
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Spackle the nail holes two passes and sand, prime over and apply the enamel. You will not see a nail hole, not one.
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Old 05-13-2011, 08:04 PM   #15
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We usually use a quick drying product...geesh...can't think of the name off the top of my head...too much varnish fumes this week...anyways..it goes on Pink and turns White really quickly and sands super easily and very rarely do we need to hit it twice .
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