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Old 07-02-2019, 12:58 PM   #1
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Default How to Fix lacquer failure?

I just looked a job where the lacquer coating is peeling on the interior part of most of the windows.

I'm guessing that the vinyl lacquer sealer has failed but I'm not really a lacquer expert. The window frames are all perfect as are all the baseboards, etc. Most of the peeling is the part near the glass but on a few windows the window sill is cracking.

How would you repair these? Priming and respraying all of them in an occupied house is a major undertaking.

What bonding primer works with lacquer? I don't want to apply vinyl sealer because it failed.

I was thinking about putting the lacquer in rattle cans for touch-ups. Obviously brushing would be easier for the windows with mullions and small glass panels. I can't imagine taping all of them...lol
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Old 07-02-2019, 01:09 PM   #2
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BTW, this is only a 4 year old house.
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Old 07-02-2019, 02:05 PM   #3
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Many lacquers are noted for being notoriously poor when exposed to moisture. Condensation is probably what caused the failure. I'm no expert when it comes to the stuff available today, but I'm sure one of the resident cabinet coating experts can help.
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Old 07-02-2019, 03:21 PM   #4
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Lacquer has no moisture resistance to speak of and very little UV stability. Don't use lacquer. It's used on production lines because it's hard to screw up when you spray it and it dries hard enough to package and ship quicker than almost any other finish, at least in it's price range. These people basically got screwed by a company doing the easiest, cheapest, fastest finish they could with no concern for longevity. They really need to be stripped, primed with a good alkyd primer, and topcoated with a UV stable acrylic. I'd probably even use an exterior acrylic. It won't be easy or cheap but....you get what you pay for. Or THINK you pay for.
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Old 07-02-2019, 06:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PACman View Post
Lacquer has no moisture resistance to speak of and very little UV stability. Don't use lacquer. It's used on production lines because it's hard to screw up when you spray it and it dries hard enough to package and ship quicker than almost any other finish, at least in it's price range. These people basically got screwed by a company doing the easiest, cheapest, fastest finish they could with no concern for longevity. They really need to be stripped, primed with a good alkyd primer, and topcoated with a UV stable acrylic. I'd probably even use an exterior acrylic. It won't be easy or cheap but....you get what you pay for. Or THINK you pay for.
They won't pay for a complete strip.You think oil based primer is better than PX nitrocellulose lacquer primer? They gave me the leftover lacquer and it's a perfect match. I actually brushed a bit on and it looked OK. I plan on getting some put into a rattle can. They have decent flat tips. Most of it is less than an inch wide.
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Old 07-02-2019, 06:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
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They won't pay for a complete strip.You think oil based primer is better than PX nitrocellulose lacquer primer? They gave me the leftover lacquer and it's a perfect match. I actually brushed a bit on and it looked OK. I plan on getting some put into a rattle can. They have decent flat tips. Most of it is less than an inch wide.
Nitrocellulose anything is not ideal on a window. Even interior. But it will last a year or so, just like it did when it was new. Depends on what your client wants i guess.
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:09 PM   #7
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@PACman Are you familiar with Southwest Builders? We used to use this nasty stuff on factory primed trim in new construction homes because it cured super fast. We'd thin it with naptha. One year later it'd flake and chip. Is this the same stuff?

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Old 07-02-2019, 09:56 PM   #8
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You're probably onto something with the rattle cans if you don't have a gravity gun and a portable compressor.



If the photos you've posted are the worst of it that actually looks like a pretty easy job. Hand sand it off - it doesn't need anything fancy just some good silicon carbide or aluminum oxide paper and a bit of elbow grease.



You could shoot the affected areas (after strip sanding to raw wood, going through the grits to 220) with a rattle can of cover stain before topcoating again with the lacquer in rattle cans. If you're just doing the one part of the windows that's pretty simple to just tape off and touch up just the affected stiles/rails. If you're shooting out of an air spray gun, ML Campbell makes a great acrylic undercoat for wood called Agualente that sands like butter and dries fast.
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Old 07-03-2019, 09:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngieM View Post
@PACman Are you familiar with Southwest Builders? We used to use this nasty stuff on factory primed trim in new construction homes because it cured super fast. We'd thin it with naptha. One year later it'd flake and chip. Is this the same stuff?

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I remember a southwest builders. Different stuff though. It was a super cheap SW wall latex we'd use in apartment repaints.
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Old 07-03-2019, 06:53 PM   #10
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Im guessing this is NC lacquer based on your previous thread..not so certain NC lacquer is compatible over Cover Stain or Agualente as per one suggestion in this thread...might want to rethink that..

If you know the color and manufacturer, I’d check with them to see if you could get either a post or pre-catalyzed lacquer mixed up in the same color and sheen, ditching the NC lacquer, and speak with tech rep about compatibility. I’ve shot post catalyzed lacquer over NC before, solvents are similar, the finish being less brittle with better water resistance, got good amalgamation/no lifting.
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Old 07-04-2019, 12:55 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Im guessing this is NC lacquer based on your previous thread..not so certain NC lacquer is compatible over Cover Stain or Agualente as per one suggestion in this thread...might want to rethink that..

If you know the color and manufacturer, I’d check with them to see if you could get either a post or pre-catalyzed lacquer mixed up in the same color and sheen, ditching the NC lacquer, and speak with tech rep about compatibility. I’ve shot post catalyzed lacquer over NC before, solvents are similar, the finish being less brittle with better water resistance, got good amalgamation/no lifting.
It's a precat...I thought that was the same a nitro.

I've only shot lacquer once in my life and it was a precat. It's definitely oil based because when I opened the fiver there was a layer of what appeared to be oil sitting on the top. It must be 3-4 years old but it mixed up well and is still a perfect match.

It's a lacquer made by Akzo Nobel called Chemcraft. AkzoNobel is the #3 paint company in the world behind #1 PPG and #2 Sherwin Williams.

Last edited by Mr Smith; 07-04-2019 at 01:01 AM..
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