HVLP finish quality using Graco 9.5 on cabinets - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Professional Painters > Surface Preparation and Application

Like Tree4Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-03-2018, 10:48 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default HVLP finish quality using Graco 9.5 on cabinets

Need some expertise here... I have been refinishing cabinets for close to 2 years now with promising results, but as with any craft, I've tried to learn something new from each kitchen job to improve my process. I recently invested in a Graco 9.5 Pro Contractor HVLP unit (fantastic rig by the way), and have been using it to spray the cabinet boxes/frames inside the home (I still use my Graco airless with a 310 FFLP tip to spray the doors offsite). Here is my question...I thoroughly clean/degrease all surfaces, then sand with 220 grit paper, then vacuum/tack cloth, and spray with 2 coats of SW Acrylic Alkyd primer, then a light hand sand, then spray 2 coats of SW Pro Classic Acrylic Alkyd (hybrid) paint. The finish generally turns out looking glassy and smooth, but when I return 1-2 days later to mount the doors, the finish on the frames is SO prone to easily chipping/scratching, and it kills me to use a tiny brush to spot repair an otherwise smooth finish panel! I do thin the primer and paint to a 35-40 second viscosity (Ford #4 cup) and use the #3 cap/needle on the Graco 9.5. I know the finish hardens as it cures over several weeks, but am I doing something glaringly wrong here? I avoid solvent/oil-based finishes inside customer's homes (and because it's a pain to clean/discard the waste). Am I spraying too light of coats? Should I be using a different primer? Am I thinning the primer too much and should be using a larger tip? I tried the #5 needle before, but wasn't a fan of the texture/orange peel. Any feedback is really appreciated.
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PaintTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-05-2018, 11:37 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 330
Rewards Points: 450
Thanks: 46
Thanked 79 Times in 62 Posts
View ThreeSistersPainting's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Your talking about two different systems of applying paint. HVLP vs. Airless, the amount of material transfer between those two is much different.

If your spraying your doors with an airless your generally applying more paint and if your spraying boxes with HVLP your generally applying less paint but a finer finish. I have switched to using a HVLP gun for all my cabinet work and I am putting down a minimum of 3 coats. I strip my cabinets down to wood before re-finishing so the first coat is more like a fog coat. It sounds like you may need to increase the amount of paint applied to the boxes through your hvlp or add a clear coat over everything to protect them better. Or use your airless to finish the boxes.

Before I transfer doors and drawers fronts I wrap them in bubble wrap, that bubble wrap stays on until the door is hung then I pull it off. Its been a good system for myself and makes transfering the doors so much easier and keeps touch ups to a minimum.

*edit
If your not stripping the clear layer off before applying water based primer there may be a bonding issue.

Last edited by ThreeSistersPainting; 02-05-2018 at 11:43 AM..
ThreeSistersPainting is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ThreeSistersPainting For This Useful Post:
edinburgh1971 (02-05-2018)
Old 02-05-2018, 01:06 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Thanks for the reply. Yeah, my airless with the 310 FFLP tip has been great (albeit messy with excess paint and overspray), but the finish goes on thick/smooth and holds up nicely, especially when I let the doors sit on the dry rack for several days before returning them to the client’s home.

Good feedback about spraying extra coats. I’ve been spraying between 2-3 coats to the cabinet frames with my HVLP, so it sounds like I need to be spraying heavier coats (without dripping!), and/or additional coats (upwards of 4). I wonder if I’m not waiting long enough to allow the paint to cure/harden before returning to mount the finished doors.

I’ve heard good things about STIX INSL-X primer, so I may give that a go as well. For it to flow through my HVLP, I’d have to thin it a good bit I’d imagine. The problem I’ve seen is when the cabinet frames get nicked on install day, the original cabinet finish is revealed (meaning the primer and paint all chipped off together). I assumed the primer I’ve been using isn’t doing its job - or I’ve been rushing the paint on after waiting only an hour or two after the primer dries and is sanded.
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-05-2018, 02:30 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Tprice2193's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 389
Thanks: 0
Thanked 95 Times in 84 Posts
View Tprice2193's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Edinburgh - Primer may be part of your chipping problem. I use BIN shellac based pigmented almost exclusively. It is alcohol based but it dries very quickly. If you use HVLP have to turn it way down and use small tip to avoid overspray. You can apply by hand methods as well. It is the universal sealer it adheres extremely well dries fast and can topcoat with virtually anything in a few hrs. One of my tricks is to get enough of it on till you can sand smooth. BIN smells since it is alcohol based. This smell goes away in just a couple hours. You might consider a different topcoat as well. About two years ago I decided to try the waterbourne pigmented lacquers. SW makes Kem Aqua plus. These finishes are designed to run through HVLP type equipment and they dry very quickly. They have a bit of learning curve. Overspray will be minimal if you turn your air and material flow down. Can't put much down on vertical surfaces or it will run. In my opinion it took my cabinet finishes to the next level. Another product widely used is PPG Breakthrough. A lot of cabinet refinishers use it here and will probably weigh in on your post.
edinburgh1971 likes this.
Tprice2193 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2018, 02:58 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Thank you so much for the insight. I will freely admit I’m paranoid about using anything solvent-based, especially inside a client’s home. Gas ranges with pilot lights, pets, children, you name it. My inexperience has kept me away from trying it, though it seems universally clear that oil-based finishes deliver by far the best outcome for cabinet refinishing.

The Pro Classic hybrid has done me well on the doors with my airless, plus my local SW team is just stellar.

Regarding the BIN shellac, I’ve seen an “Advanced”, synthetic waterborne formula of this. Worth trying?

SW comped me a gallon of the Kem Aqua plus undercoat and paint a few months ago. It dried pretty quickly and turned out decent, though I thought I read somewhere that it was meant for unfinished cabinets receiving their first coat of finish (like a factory job). The cabinets I do are already finished (either stained/poly or previously painted), so I assumed KA+ wasn’t a good fit for my purposes.

The value prop of PPG breakthrough was too good not to try. I’ve given it a few uses (a piece of furniture and a small bathroom vanity job). For laughs, I tried using it without primer just to test its adhesion. I was amazed how well it bonded after just scrubbing it with TSP and wiping it down with a tack cloth. I couldn’t scratch it off the following morning with my fingernail. It needs to be seriously strained and well mixed. Perhaps just my luck, but each gallon I’ve tried has been full of chunks of goopy dried paint. My paper filter will show about a teaspoon of chunks after I pour about 32 ounces. Crazy.

I’d love to get your thoughts.

Thanks again.
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2018, 03:02 PM   #6
Troy
 
stelzerpaintinginc.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 1,911
Rewards Points: 6
Thanks: 2,046
Thanked 2,560 Times in 1,125 Posts
View stelzerpaintinginc.'s Photo Album My Photos
Default

If you're going to Sherwin Williams to get your paint, ask them for a few wet mil thickness gauges and use them regularly. It takes all of the guesswork out of whether or not you're applying too heavy or too light. Although you generally won't see the thickness gauges on the shelves, most stores carry them and all stores can get them for you if they don't carry them. They are free too. Between the paint cans info & data sheets online, you'll be able to see exactly what thickness you should be applying. It boggles my mind how many painters have never used a WFT gauge.

If you're experiencing scratching of freshly painted cabs, it means you're probably handling them before they've cured enough. This could be from insufficient heat & air flow of cabs to facilitate a speedy cure. Could also be from applying too much product too quickly, thus slowing down the cure. You might consider switching to a product with earlier blocking times. PPG's Breathrough is great, but if you're sticking with SW, ask them about their Pro-Industrial Line, and they'll probably recommend their Multi-Surface Acrylic. The quicker the blocking time of a product, the easier to handle without the risk of damage due to uncured/soft paint.

Chipping is another story altogether and is usually indicative of bonding issues, which means having to reevaluate your finishing schedule, (although if you WERE applying too much product too quickly as stated above, it could possibly be culprit).
CApainter and edinburgh1971 like this.
__________________
Troy Stevens, Stelzer Painting Inc.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
stelzerpaintinginc. is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to stelzerpaintinginc. For This Useful Post:
edinburgh1971 (02-05-2018)
Old 02-05-2018, 06:19 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Thanks so much. I will definitely ask for the wet mil thickness gauges. I never knew these existed, and it does sound like I’ll get some great value in using them. I’ll also bring up the SW Pro-Industrial line as well to investigate other primer options.

I meant scratching more than chipping/flaking, but I’ll give an example of a recent dilemma that was set me back a day. I always pre-score tapelines when the painting is all done and it’s time to start removing my masking. On those areas where the cabinet frames meet a silicone seam (counters, etc), I recently pulled my tape off without pre-scoring and it took about a square inch of paint off with it. There’s nothing more frustrating than seeing a perfectly sprayed panel get ruined like that. While it was totally my fault, it made me ponder if I was using an inferior/incorrect primer or paint, or as you said I was just foolishly rushing the process and not giving the new finish enough time to cure.
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2018, 11:40 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Tprice2193's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 389
Thanks: 0
Thanked 95 Times in 84 Posts
View Tprice2193's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Edinburgh:. I have not tried the synthetic shellac. Others on here have strongly indicated its not an acceptable substitute. I would also point out that alcohol does not flash as readily as lacquer thinner and the smell is gone rather quickly. My biggest problem is cleaning my gun after using it. It will adhere to most anything. Definitely a product to have in your bag of tricks but you still have some solvent based precautions. You are correct KA+ pigmented and the surfacer are designed to be used together on new wood to achieve the KCMA certification. KA+ pigmented can be used for refinishes after suitable surface preparation. I scrubb, abrade 220, and put on two coats of BIN (enough to sand smooth) then topcoat with KA+ 3 coats. Can bubble wrap, transport, and install next day with no blocking issues. I would use HVLP all the way with KA+. You can sand, wet sand, and or rub out blemishes fingerprints toolmarks and even orange peel. This is my experience not necessarily trying to sell you on it. We have several refinishers on here and we all have differences in our processes.
edinburgh1971 likes this.
Tprice2193 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2018, 12:42 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default

TPrice, awesome insight. That’s very encouraging to learn that KA+ pigmented can be used with BIN primer. I made a poor assumption that the surface and pigmented had to be used together exclusively. That’s fantastic that you get such quick turnaround using your method. I recall the KA+ being pretty thin out of the can. Do you thin yours down at all for your HVLP? What size needle/cap do you use? I really appreciate the information. This is such a great forum.
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2018, 01:37 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Tprice2193's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 389
Thanks: 0
Thanked 95 Times in 84 Posts
View Tprice2193's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I use a graco edge II plus gun with #3 needle. This model has only 1 cap. Use on Stage II with air down a little on gun. Do not thin. May have to turn material flow down too. Just enough to get good aerosolization. To much air and you will get a lot of overspray and drying of finish before it hits surface. Put your doors on a turntable and you can get more finish on without running. Use the mil guage till you get the hang of it. Vertical surfaces are the toughest, runs. Use the Round spray pattern for corners and detail. Good ventilation speeds curing.
Tprice2193 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2018, 09:14 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 22
Thanks: 7
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View edinburgh1971's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Awesome. I went to my local SW store today and picked up a wet mil gauge tool. I will try it out on my next job! I also checked out their in-house pigmented shellac primer - just to feel out its consistency. Wow - I totally get why it needs no thinning for an HVLP. If it's anything like the BIN shellac primer, I'll enjoy using a quality material out of the can without thinning. I use the exact same gun as you - I love the artisan air valve. So far, I've not had to set the turbine past setting 4 (out of 10) and the air/material valves about halfway, even with the Pro Classic (thinned 10%). Do you use the #3 needle for the KA+ as well?
edinburgh1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2018, 09:46 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
CApainter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Posts: 14,336
Rewards Points: 1,812
Thanks: 11,198
Thanked 9,597 Times in 5,449 Posts
View CApainter's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I don't know what solvent to product ratio you used to get a 40 second measure of viscosity, but the TDS suggests not thinning. And, at roughly 54% SBV, you're wanting to apply the material at a 4 mil WFT in order to achieve the recommended 1.6 mil DFT per coat.
CApainter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2018, 10:31 PM   #13
Kev D.
 
finishesbykevyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Newfoundland Can.
Posts: 1,260
Rewards Points: 367
Thanks: 277
Thanked 185 Times in 158 Posts
View finishesbykevyn's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by edinburgh1971 View Post
Thanks for the reply. Yeah, my airless with the 310 FFLP tip has been great (albeit messy with excess paint and overspray), but the finish goes on thick/smooth and holds up nicely, especially when I let the doors sit on the dry rack for several days before returning them to the clientís home.

Good feedback about spraying extra coats. Iíve been spraying between 2-3 coats to the cabinet frames with my HVLP, so it sounds like I need to be spraying heavier coats (without dripping!), and/or additional coats (upwards of 4). I wonder if Iím not waiting long enough to allow the paint to cure/harden before returning to mount the finished doors.

Iíve heard good things about STIX INSL-X primer, so I may give that a go as well. For it to flow through my HVLP, Iíd have to thin it a good bit Iíd imagine. The problem Iíve seen is when the cabinet frames get nicked on install day, the original cabinet finish is revealed (meaning the primer and paint all chipped off together). I assumed the primer Iíve been using isnít doing its job - or Iíve been rushing the paint on after waiting only an hour or two after the primer dries and is sanded.
I use the INSLX Stix over varnished doors with great results. Not sure if it can be sprayed with hvlp. Im still using my Graco airless. I'm also using BM Advance for topcoat with fantastic results. Both waterborne products. .I generally just brush and roll my boxes and spray all the doors at shop.
finishesbykevyn is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2018, 02:09 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Tprice2193's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 389
Thanks: 0
Thanked 95 Times in 84 Posts
View Tprice2193's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Edinburgh:. Yes I use #3 tip all the way primer and KA+. The recommended tip size for KA+ is 0.055-0.070 per PDS. The #3 Graco is 0.051 and the #4 is 0.071. I think you may have same gun as I do Graco Edge I Plus. The SW equivalent for BIN is fine I use it more often than BIN. You will have to get denatured alcohol for cleaning your gun after using BIN. Water will clean up the KA+ but a little butylcellusolve will help clean gun. Your SW dealer will have this. Read the PDS for KA+ pigmented it has a lot of good info in it.
Tprice2193 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2018, 02:29 AM   #15
Mr. Paint that
 
Jimithing616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 28
Thanks: 12
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
View Jimithing616's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by edinburgh1971 View Post
Thanks for the reply. Yeah, my airless with the 310 FFLP tip has been great (albeit messy with excess paint and overspray), but the finish goes on thick/smooth and holds up nicely, especially when I let the doors sit on the dry rack for several days before returning them to the clientís home.

Good feedback about spraying extra coats. Iíve been spraying between 2-3 coats to the cabinet frames with my HVLP, so it sounds like I need to be spraying heavier coats (without dripping!), and/or additional coats (upwards of 4). I wonder if Iím not waiting long enough to allow the paint to cure/harden before returning to mount the finished doors.

Iíve heard good things about STIX INSL-X primer, so I may give that a go as well. For it to flow through my HVLP, Iíd have to thin it a good bit Iíd imagine. The problem Iíve seen is when the cabinet frames get nicked on install day, the original cabinet finish is revealed (meaning the primer and paint all chipped off together). I assumed the primer Iíve been using isnít doing its job - or Iíve been rushing the paint on after waiting only an hour or two after the primer dries and is sanded.
From all my research and speaking to every paint/product and HVLP manufacturer rep in my area and at all the shows.... the one thing I keep hearing is when using water based or waterbourne primers like youíre using you need to wait at least 4 hours before top coating

Apparently if you donít, exactly what you have happening, happens, every time.

The water based primers need to fully evaporate whatever (canít recall all the mumbo jumbo) but take away is...

Oil primer. 45 mins to hour is ok. Not oil, wait 4 hours if not the next day and they will then, and only then, affix themselves to cabinets like an oil, or as close to it as they possibly can

Again, no expert here, just a guy who has spent a few months compiling info from experts because Im starting to finally touch cabinet jobs, and I wonít do that until I can learn everything I can and figure out the very best system that exists... for me. For my customer. And for my sanity, time and reputation too
Jimithing616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2018, 05:02 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,248
Rewards Points: 199
Thanks: 85
Thanked 406 Times in 305 Posts
View PNW Painter's Photo Album My Photos
Default HVLP finish quality using Graco 9.5 on cabinets

Iíve never used SWís Acrylic Alkyd primer, but it sounds like itís the weak link in your process based on your issues when youíve pulled tape. Itís possible that you didnít let it cure long enough, or that thinning has effected the adhesion or that itís not the right product for this application.

If you want to stick with Waterbased primers Iíd recommend Insl-X Stix or SW Extreme Bond (since you like SW). Iíve had excellent results with Stix whenever Iíve used it, but I havenít tried Extreme Bond.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Last edited by PNW Painter; 03-24-2018 at 05:06 AM..
PNW Painter is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PNW Painter For This Useful Post:
edinburgh1971 (04-12-2018)
Old 03-24-2018, 10:24 PM   #17
Member
 
gregplus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 93
Rewards Points: 194
Thanks: 2
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
View gregplus's Photo Album My Photos
Default hi

I used SW’s Acrylic Alkyd if waterbased one is the one you talking about? (red can) and was not happy, it does not stick well and does not block tannin well.

BIN is unbeatable.

SHER-WOOD came up with new waterbase primer that is supposed to be replacement for BIN?? and is low VOC and low odor if I remember correctly, fast drying and can be used as undercoated for Kem Aqua. It is also sendable within 60 minutes.

It is SHER-WOOD 5421W Universal Primer, part number: E64W521

I just ordered 2 gallons to test it for repaints cabinets.

TDS:
https://www.paintdocs.com/docs/webPD...prodno=E64W521
gregplus is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregplus For This Useful Post:
edinburgh1971 (04-12-2018)
Old 03-25-2018, 11:21 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 1,848
Thanks: 64
Thanked 114 Times in 95 Posts
View Mr Smith's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregplus View Post
I used SWís Acrylic Alkyd if waterbased one is the one you talking about? (red can) and was not happy, it does not stick well and does not block tannin well.

BIN is unbeatable.

SHER-WOOD came up with new waterbase primer that is supposed to be replacement for BIN?? and is low VOC and low odor if I remember correctly, fast drying and can be used as undercoated for Kem Aqua. It is also sendable within 60 minutes.

It is SHER-WOOD 5421W Universal Primer, part number: E64W521

I just ordered 2 gallons to test it for repaints cabinets.

TDS:
https://www.paintdocs.com/docs/webPD...prodno=E64W521
I wonder how good it is as an actual bonding primer over old lacquer and clear polyurethane coatings? It sounds promising if true. If it powders up when sanding they may have a winner.
Mr Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2018, 05:30 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
woodcoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,113
Rewards Points: 2,304
Thanks: 12
Thanked 840 Times in 579 Posts
View woodcoyote's Photo Album My Photos
Default

I'll chip in.

The 220 in my estimation is too fine a grit. You need to be closer to 120 or 150 grit.

My feeling is with 220 you aren't profiling the surface enough. Paint, unlike stains have a higher solid content, so unless you go really stupid with the sanding, chances are you won't see scratches. Especially if you plan to prime + 2 coat it, I just don't see the scratches coming through. I'd say go 120 and see how it works.

Personally I use the medium sanding sponges for drywall. They are fairly rough, last longer, cost less than other sanding sponges made for wood. They work good to rough up sealer coats on doors and even dull out paint, which is what you need to adhere stuff.

Scuff sand, extreme bonding primer, then 2 coats of finish paint = done.

Another paint to give a shot at is the Waterborn Alkyd Urethane Enamel from Sherwin. Just used it on a job recently and they came out pretty good. Stuff sticks pretty good and dries up fairly strong.
woodcoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to woodcoyote For This Useful Post:
edinburgh1971 (04-12-2018)
Old 03-31-2018, 10:13 PM   #20
Member
 
gregplus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 93
Rewards Points: 194
Thanks: 2
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
View gregplus's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodcoyote View Post
I'll chip in.

The 220 in my estimation is too fine a grit. You need to be closer to 120 or 150 grit.

My feeling is with 220 you aren't profiling the surface enough. Paint, unlike stains have a higher solid content, so unless you go really stupid with the sanding, chances are you won't see scratches. Especially if you plan to prime + 2 coat it, I just don't see the scratches coming through. I'd say go 120 and see how it works.

Personally I use the medium sanding sponges for drywall. They are fairly rough, last longer, cost less than other sanding sponges made for wood. They work good to rough up sealer coats on doors and even dull out paint, which is what you need to adhere stuff.

Scuff sand, extreme bonding primer, then 2 coats of finish paint = done.

Another paint to give a shot at is the Waterborn Alkyd Urethane Enamel from Sherwin. Just used it on a job recently and they came out pretty good. Stuff sticks pretty good and dries up fairly strong.
Does Waterborn Alkyd Urethane Enamel needs primer or can go directly?
gregplus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Graco Fine Finish Tip RH Surface Preparation and Application 56 03-12-2017 01:20 AM
HVLP Graco vs Titan Painter General Painting Discussion 2 02-11-2017 07:36 PM
Graco Pro Finish II Helpful Hints and Tips Rbriggs82 General Painting Discussion 15 09-06-2016 09:43 PM
Graco hvlp or titan hvlp BPC Tools, Supplies and Equipment 2 03-30-2016 08:48 PM
Fine finish spray tips. Zoomer General Painting Discussion 113 01-01-2016 10:20 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com