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Old 03-08-2020, 09:48 PM   #21
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I look at it the same way as if someone wants to brew their own beer, or make their own donuts. Both are a lot more convenient and cheaper to buy at a store, but some people just like to do it themselves.

For example, I'm in the process of making my own pencils. And yes, it is extremely tedious to drill that seven inch long by 1/16th inch diameter hole, but knowing I did it myself, brings me joy.
Well THAT I can understand. Last time I bought a package of #2s the price was outrageous.
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Old 03-08-2020, 09:59 PM   #22
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Here's a tutorial that might help if anybody wants to make pencils.

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Old 03-08-2020, 11:48 PM   #23
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15-20% would come out to $225-$300 for the stain. 15 gallons to cover 300' would bring the cost of stain to roughly $18 dollars a gallon. If I could get it that price I wouldnt have made the thread.

I think your math is off?? Why would you need 15 gallons of stain. If the fence is 300' x 5' that is 1500 sq/ft for one side which is the figure you gave us to start. So by the math, you would be charging $1 per sq/ft. A typical gallon of nice oil stain with tax is about $50 and covers 175-300 sq/ft per gallon. So if you maxed out the finish, it would take 5-6 gallons, or $300.
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Old 03-09-2020, 12:29 AM   #24
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OMG! that video was funny!

On a serious note, I actually use lead wire. It's a lot easier to insert. Just a tip.
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Old 03-09-2020, 02:45 AM   #25
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OMG! that video was funny!

On a serious note, I actually use lead wire. It's a lot easier to insert. Just a tip.
I would think that just like with other “objects” just a tip isn’t enough. You need lead (or graphite and clay) the entire length of your pencil.
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Old 03-09-2020, 10:52 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by MikeCalifornia View Post
I think your math is off?? Why would you need 15 gallons of stain. If the fence is 300' x 5' that is 1500 sq/ft for one side which is the figure you gave us to start. So by the math, you would be charging $1 per sq/ft. A typical gallon of nice oil stain with tax is about $50 and covers 175-300 sq/ft per gallon. So if you maxed out the finish, it would take 5-6 gallons, or $300.
That would work if it were a nice flat fence, but most fences Im familiar with you have to double the square footage to take into account the sides of boards, and supports and what not.

I would definitely figure on about 12 gallons for a fence that size. Not that I do a whole hell of a lot of fences, but when I have, its taken a lot more stain that I figured.

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Old 03-09-2020, 11:08 AM   #27
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You should get with Lightningboy65 on that. He's from Pencilvania.
#1 vacation spot for pencils in the world. Like most natives of lands that are inundated with tourists, I hate tourists!!! And thus hate pencils. You won't find one pencil in my house....all pens!

Any type of collabo involving pencils ain't gonna happen. Not with me....
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Old 03-09-2020, 01:44 PM   #28
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OMG! that video was funny!

On a serious note, I actually use lead wire. It's a lot easier to insert. Just a tip.
"Oh, honey- I'm just gonna put the tip in..." That'll put lead in your pencil...
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Old 03-09-2020, 10:46 PM   #29
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That would work if it were a nice flat fence, but most fences Im familiar with you have to double the square footage to take into account the sides of boards, and supports and what not.

I would definitely figure on about 12 gallons for a fence that size. Not that I do a whole hell of a lot of fences, but when I have, its taken a lot more stain that I figured.

However much stain it takes, I'm just baffled by the OP question of trying to make his own stain. To stain a fence cost what it costs, its really up to the HO to decided if that works for them. Like I said, no need to spend the money, wood will not just fall apart if its not coated.
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Old 03-09-2020, 11:13 PM   #30
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I've never considered making my own stain for deck & fence projects, but this thread has got me thinking. I probably still won't for those bigger projects, but occasionally I'll do custom furniture (primarily outdoor stuff like outdoor dining tables & benches) and I wonder if I could actually charge more money for making a custom stain? Clients like the idea of having something completely unique to them, so what about using this "handmade" process to increase your value and price for the project?
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:29 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Bend Oregon Painters View Post
I've never considered making my own stain for deck & fence projects, but this thread has got me thinking. I probably still won't for those bigger projects, but occasionally I'll do custom furniture (primarily outdoor stuff like outdoor dining tables & benches) and I wonder if I could actually charge more money for making a custom stain? Clients like the idea of having something completely unique to them, so what about using this "handmade" process to increase your value and price for the project?

Rather than making your own stain (that's a rabbit hole of how deep you want to go producing raw materials) IMO you would be better off using existing products but incorporating new techniques into your finishes.


for example shou sugi ban + metal complex dye under an exterior stain produces really beautiful rich layered look that would be difficult for anyone else to reproduce.
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Old 03-11-2020, 02:18 PM   #32
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Well THAT I can understand. Last time I bought a package of #2s the price was outrageous.
It's like when you come across that closet in a home where the HO works in a big office, institution , or school. Shelves full of office supplies. Thumb tacks, paper clips, pens, pencils, paper, post it notes (the 3M ones, not the knock offs)....the list is endless. Hundreds, if not thousands of dollars worth of office supplies. Their closet is probably better stocked than the supply closet at their office.

I often wondered if my employees had a closet full of paint supplies at their homes??? Brushes, rollers, maybe a sprayer or two.....
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Old 03-15-2020, 09:46 AM   #33
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If it's just cosmetic? Easy. I had a customer who makes bird houses. He traded me one as $ off his bill. He just adds a cup of latex paint to water and stains.
My bird house has been out there for 3 years: stain is fine. I'm in the cold north too.
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Old 03-15-2020, 02:49 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Bend Oregon Painters View Post
I've never considered making my own stain for deck & fence projects, but this thread has got me thinking. I probably still won't for those bigger projects, but occasionally I'll do custom furniture (primarily outdoor stuff like outdoor dining tables & benches) and I wonder if I could actually charge more money for making a custom stain? Clients like the idea of having something completely unique to them, so what about using this "handmade" process to increase your value and price for the project?
The beer industry has proven that there is a market for "Craft" products, even though large manufacturers can produce similar and cheaper products. But, there has to be an aesthetic value attached to the craft producer that is appealing to the target market. For example: Craft beer makers typically have big beards, plaid shirts, and earth tone coveralls, giving them a wholesome, everyday mountain guy look that's appealing to the techno urbanites.

Now for a "Craft" stain product, instead of marketing as the typical wood crafter, maybe market the stain as a "boutique" product. Kind of like what the skin conditioning market does for wrinkles and age spots, but for wood instead.

I could see the brand being a happy tree rubbing her scrubby bark with "Lorielle's Wood Conditioner and Toning Agent'
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Old 03-15-2020, 03:55 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by CApainter View Post
The beer industry has proven that there is a market for "Craft" products, even though large manufacturers can produce similar and cheaper products. But, there has to be an aesthetic value attached to the craft producer that is appealing to the target market. For example: Craft beer makers typically have big beards, plaid shirts, and earth tone coveralls, giving them a wholesome, everyday mountain guy look that's appealing to the techno urbanites.

Now for a "Craft" stain product, instead of marketing as the typical wood crafter, maybe market the stain as a "boutique" product. Kind of like what the skin conditioning market does for wrinkles and age spots, but for wood instead.

I could see the brand being a happy tree rubbing her scrubby bark with "Lorielle's Wood Conditioner and Toning Agent'
Not sure this analogy works. The craft beer industry has grown because the beer produced is far superior to the mass produced products. The reason it is better because they use better ingredients...which produces a much better tasting beer...not similar at all. And the reason why some of these beers cost so much is that they are using a lot more ingredients to produce beers with more alcohol, and aging them for weeks and months in bourbon barrels. Which means that idiots like me are now willing to pay $20 for a 4 pack of pints....when you consider a decent beer like Sam Adams can be had for $16 for a 12 pack...can you imagine the cost of a gallon of stain. I think Storm solid stain is great at around $40 and cannot imagine a product that would cost as much as $600 a gallon being that much superior. California and Ben Moore do not use cheap ingredients like Budweiser and Coors.

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Old 03-16-2020, 03:02 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CApainter View Post
The beer industry has proven that there is a market for "Craft" products, even though large manufacturers can produce similar and cheaper products. But, there has to be an aesthetic value attached to the craft producer that is appealing to the target market. For example: Craft beer makers typically have big beards, plaid shirts, and earth tone coveralls, giving them a wholesome, everyday mountain guy look that's appealing to the techno urbanites.

Now for a "Craft" stain product, instead of marketing as the typical wood crafter, maybe market the stain as a "boutique" product. Kind of like what the skin conditioning market does for wrinkles and age spots, but for wood instead.

I could see the brand being a happy tree rubbing her scrubby bark with "Lorielle's Wood Conditioner and Toning Agent'

Don't dig too deep, you may not like what you find. As the big brewers started losing market share to craft brewers, the big guys started buying up the craft brewers. Many, if not most, craft beers with any type of market share beyond regional, are owned by a big brewer. In fact two or three of the largest brewers probably own 90% of the beer market.

A quick Google search will shock many as to the degree the beer industry has become an oligopoly.
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Old 03-16-2020, 06:57 PM   #37
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Don't dig too deep, you may not like what you find. As the big brewers started losing market share to craft brewers, the big guys started buying up the craft brewers. Many, if not most, craft beers with any type of market share beyond regional, are owned by a big brewer. In fact two or three of the largest brewers probably own 90% of the beer market.

A quick Google search will shock many as to the degree the beer industry has become an oligopoly.

As long as it gives me a buzz, what do I care.
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