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Old 11-05-2013, 11:49 AM   #1
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so we all know with NC the goal is to do the best job in the shortest amount of man hrs. Most of the year it s repaints and remodels for us. This year we have been working with a general and doing three to four spec homes at a time. No matter you are always trying to find a quicker way. The way we have been doing these is to finish ceilings and walls and have to return when all mill work has been installed and run it. The quickest way I have found to run walls and ceilings is to shoot and back roll my primer and top coat walls first, don't worry about color on ceilings. Come back next day run plastic on my walls with tape as close to ceiling with out go on to ceilings, shoot and back roll, peel back plastic and all you have to do is run the line. Yes it would be better to run trim before walls were finished but not an option, has anyone else ran this set up.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:24 PM   #2
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This is the approach that we finally settled on:

Spray prime walls and ceilings; spray two coats of final color on ceilings; spray one coat of final color on walls; finish trim; let everybody else finish (yes, EVERYBODY); brush/roll final coat on walls.

Around here, 99% of the GWB has spray texture so we don't need to backroll unless it's Level 5.
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Old 11-05-2013, 02:15 PM   #3
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My fastest approach for new construction is to get every thing prepped including mill work. Spray doors and trim first mask off, spray/roll walls, then 4 foot film on wall perimeter then spray ceilings. tear down paper and plastic and touch up with brush on cut line imperfections.
The film prices are killing me lately but still worth the expense with the time savings.
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Old 11-05-2013, 02:20 PM   #4
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I just did one that went about as quick as it ever has and still maintain a reasonably high quality level.

Spray and back rolled primer on ceilings an walls before trim.
Spray/roll finish on all walls shielding ceilings and cut in as you go.

Finish all trim on bench one coat.
Caulk/fill all trim after instillation, using custom wall color caulk for trim to wall cracks (Create-a-Color).

Finish coat all trim.
Touch up walls.
Done.

The good thing about this job was that it was for a very good builder. Sequencing was near perfect, and minimum damage to walls during trim/floor instillation.
A few areas required a second coat on entire walls, but mostly just touch up.

Shielding the ceilings is where I really pick up time. It's just a lot faster than masking if you can get the hang of it.
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Old 11-05-2013, 08:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
I just did one that went about as quick as it ever has and still maintain a reasonably high quality level.

Spray and back rolled primer on ceilings an walls before trim.
Spray/roll finish on all walls shielding ceilings and cut in as you go.

Finish all trim on bench one coat.
Caulk/fill all trim after instillation, using custom wall color caulk for trim to wall cracks (Create-a-Color).

Finish coat all trim.
Touch up walls.
Done.

The good thing about this job was that it was for a very good builder. Sequencing was near perfect, and minimum damage to walls during trim/floor instillation.
A few areas required a second coat on entire walls, but mostly just touch up.

Shielding the ceilings is where I really pick up time. It's just a lot faster than masking if you can get the hang of it.
It's that "minimum damage" that can make a world of difference. That's the main reason we started doing a final coat on all of the walls after everything else was done. First of all, there's no question how how much touch up we'll have to do. We're doing all the walls in what amounts to a re-paint (having to remove electrical trims, mask off base, etc.), so it is easy to bid that part. Second, we don't have to worry about try to sort out who scuffed up which wall. Third, no worries about touch-ups showing.
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Old 11-05-2013, 09:28 PM   #6
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+1 on the shield

I have been practicing with a shield. One trick I have found is to keep a 5 gal bucket filled 3/4 full of water in a strategic place. Dip one end in and barehanded wash it, flip & repeat, then wipe w/a dry rag. (30 sec max)

Because I prefer smaller tips, my backroller guy is generally waiting on me. So, he cleans my shields as we go.

Truly amazing the times we are producing.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:12 PM   #7
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We're not talking custom...right? this is production?
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:38 PM   #8
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We're not talking custom...right? this is production?

The shielding method I described is certainly a 'production technique.
But that doesn't necessarily limit it to low budget type jobs.

Shielding is just like anything else, it can be done poorly or perfectly.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmayspaint View Post
The shielding method I described is certainly a 'production technique.
But that doesn't necessarily limit it to low budget type jobs.

Shielding is just like anything else, it can be done poorly or perfectly.
Spray/shield, backroll and cut all at once?
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:53 PM   #10
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We spray and back roll the primer (tinted) walls and ceilings, 1st coat the ceiling, back roll, fog the second coat. Roll first and second coat on the walls, 2 of us rolling, one with a 30m x 9" and the other with a 10mm x18". Spray the closets. We tried spraying walls first but the poly issues seem to take a lot of time.
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:29 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gough
This is the approach that we finally settled on: Spray prime walls and ceilings; spray two coats of final color on ceilings; spray one coat of final color on walls; finish trim; let everybody else finish (yes, EVERYBODY); brush/roll final coat on walls. Around here, 99% of the GWB has spray texture so we don't need to backroll unless it's Level 5.
Does this assume your ceilings and walls are the same paint? Otherwise how are you spraying the walls after the lids? Masking?
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Old 11-06-2013, 06:32 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gough View Post
This is the approach that we finally settled on:

Spray prime walls and ceilings; spray two coats of final color on ceilings; spray one coat of final color on walls; finish trim; let everybody else finish (yes, EVERYBODY); brush/roll final coat on walls.

Around here, 99% of the GWB has spray texture so we don't need to backroll unless it's Level 5.
Auyh.

I like the trim package installed before we even start allowing for proper prep. If we get an off day and it fits into the GC's schedule, we do prime/backroll the drywall.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:03 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damon T View Post
Does this assume your ceilings and walls are the same paint? Otherwise how are you spraying the walls after the lids? Masking?
A lot of the time, they are the same. If they're not, we'll spray the first color coat up close to the ceiling, then catch it when we cut/roll the second color coat on the wall.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:04 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monstertruck View Post
Auyh.

I like the trim package installed before we even start allowing for proper prep. If we get an off day and it fits into the GC's schedule, we do prime/backroll the drywall.
Do you finish the trim before starting on the walls?

Our preferred approach is to prime and apply the first coat to the loose trim before it is installed.
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Old 11-06-2013, 01:54 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Do you finish the trim before starting on the walls?

Our preferred approach is to prime and apply the first coat to the loose trim before it is installed.
Yes.
We rarely get to touch the trim package prior to installation.
The times it's possible, we leap at the chance!
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Old 11-07-2013, 08:30 PM   #16
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the house s were doing are 3 to 4 homes at a time. AS soon as the walls and ceilings are textured and dry we have a opening of a three to four days to `put color on ceilings and walls and then its on to the next. They bring in cabinets and all mill work which isn t an option to play with cause finish guys throwing it up when it arrives.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:39 PM   #17
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Well I hate to be out of the norm, but I guess I am.

Almost all we do is new construction work, from staining beams/doors/windows to painting walls etc.

Myself, and 2 other guys usually knock out a house in 2 days, 3 tops with caulking all the seams etc. Every wall gets caulk, every ceiling gets caulk, coat closets etc (every corner). Granted we are in the southwest and our architecture is radically different than what is on the coasts, so I can't speak for others.

Method:
Spray primer
Spray Paint

No back roll. Comes out buttery smooth, touch ups are easy. We put the paint on real thick. 1 coat of primer & paint on the walls.

I'll try to post pics of the aftermath sometime, comes out good in my opinion.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:53 AM   #18
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Boy I miss the knockdownwalls of the west coast. Just spray and walk away.
Smooth walls as far as the eye can see out here so my nemisis the roller must come out every job.
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Old 11-18-2013, 08:03 PM   #19
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Reply to DRIFTWEED, re shielding process

For even better production, ditch the water in the bucket. Here's the process.

1)I start spraying/shielding the wall, usually get 20-30 feet before shield is ABOUT to drip (4 foot shield)

2)Pass shield to backroller guy, he swipes the shield with 6 inch taping knife into empty bucket, and then wipes the edge with dry rag.

3) While step 2 is happening, I'm spraying out the body on the section of wall that I shielded in step 1.

4)Backroller guy places clean shield against wall where I need it next and heads for his roller.

5) I get body in first section sprayed out, grab shield, and proceed to step 1.

If the backroller is worth a sh*t, they can keep up with their eyes shut. What happens when you figure out this process, is that you'll find you can practically keep the trigger squeezed non-stop and really log the miles. It amounts to letting off the trigger for about 1 second (to set shield down) every 45 seconds and letting off the trigger for 2 seconds (to pick shield up) every 90 seconds. My shield line is my cut line, no brushing (except 8" at outside corners.

And yes, this is production work, not custom home builder work. But I've got several thousand hours shielding and can put it on pretty nicely. Usually use a 521 tip for your average PM 200 eggshell. No problem to get on 300 gallons of finish coat in a day doing apartment/condo buildings.
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Old 11-18-2013, 08:19 PM   #20
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You sir are a GENIUS!!
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