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Old 07-22-2015, 08:36 PM   #1
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Default Not sure how to attack this.

The house i'm currently painting the aluminum siding on needs help on the inside.I haven't worked on interior in this bad shape in a long time and am a bit rusty out of date on the proper prep.The up stairs bedroom walls are the cement like with very little wallpaper left on them.The hall and the downstairs are a mess.The homeowner tried the paper tiger wheel and it did nothing.I tried a steamer but it just made the plaster underneath too soft.I tried a warm wash ans a scrape and all it did was dig the plaster all up.
Some areas the homeowner may go over with new board.Some rooms he may have a skip trowel method done.All i had on me was Cover Stain so i did a small area in each room.The room with the cement like walls took good and i was able to scrape off most of the paper after that.It seemed to lock it down ok.The walls with full paper backing on them i primed to see how that would work and it still could use another scrape and 2nd coat of primer.I never have painted anything over wallpaper backing before.
Is there a good primer that will lock it all down or is the cover stain good enough.If there is no solution other than removing it all then that will be done or we might just gut it and start from scratch.Obviously whatever is most cost effective method would be best.This particular customer has a few rental properties and is far far from being a slum lord.He cares about his properties and puts the best products in them.I would like to give him the best solution for his problems.
I will post a few picts in the next few min.Any help would be greatly
Thanks Rob
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:39 PM   #2
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Heres a feq shots of the walls.


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Old 07-22-2015, 09:11 PM   #3
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Gardz the walls. Scrape whatever is poking out after Gardz is dry. Skim coat the deep gouges, cracks, and holes. Spray knockdown texture on all the walls, prime paint and done.
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Old 07-22-2015, 10:59 PM   #4
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Are you SURE it's plaster? Take your box knife and see if it is scoreable. I thought I had a plaster job, but the wall were as hard as slate. I burned up a rotozip tip in less than 12 inches. Couldn't scratch the plaster at all.

I stepped back, did some research and discover that it was asbestos drywall.

The paper was peeling EXACTLY like that ceiling picture.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:39 PM   #5
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Looks like a tear down to me, or a learning burn for the local fire dept.



Seriously, from what you are describing, it doesn't sound like there is any good permanent solution. Either overlay or remodel back to the studs. IMO, anything else is a band-aid.



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Old 07-23-2015, 04:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daArch View Post
Looks like a tear down to me, or a learning burn for the local fire dept.



Seriously, from what you are describing, it doesn't sound like there is any good permanent solution. Either overlay or remodel back to the studs. IMO, anything else is a band-aid.
My thoughts exactly.Hes spending a lot of money transforming this rental property into something nice.IMO i would just do it right the first time and be done with it forever but i def understand wanting to save a few bucks.I did mention Lambrechts suggestion which will most likely be the path we take providing i can get more of the paper off.He did mention a shellac based primer but i'm not sure what hes talking about and if that would work better than the Gardz.We'll figure it all out by the beginning of next week.
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Old 07-23-2015, 04:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakey0818 View Post
My thoughts exactly.Hes spending a lot of money transforming this rental property into something nice.IMO i would just do it right the first time and be done with it forever but i def understand wanting to save a few bucks.I did mention Lambrechts suggestion which will most likely be the path we take providing i can get more of the paper off.He did mention a shellac based primer but i'm not sure what hes talking about and if that would work better than the Gardz.We'll figure it all out by the beginning of next week.
Gardz is way,way,way, cheaper and will do the job. I would use 2 heavy coats
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:37 PM   #8
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It's places like that which made putting up paneling popular.
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Old 07-23-2015, 03:01 PM   #9
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I did one last summer which was in far worse condition than what you are dealing with using the system that I recommended and it turned out beautiful. Have gotten a lot of referral work from it. We did all the walls, layed over the ceilings with 3/8 drywall, did all the woodwork, windows, doors, & installed crown molding throughout. They had bought the house to flip but love the results so much that they are giving the house to one of their kids to keep it in their family. The overall cost was much cheaper than a full gut and redo and the place looks brand new. I am fully confident that the system that we used will last for many many years.
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Old 07-23-2015, 03:25 PM   #10
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You will definitely want to use a oil base product or shellac base to seal down the surface. Once you have the surface sealed you can then use drywall texture and a water base product to finish. I have done what you are doing before and had pretty good luck. But I will say the best would be to go to the studs and start new. That's not to cost effective. Best of luck

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Old 07-23-2015, 04:16 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lambrecht View Post
I did one last summer which was in far worse condition than what you are dealing with using the system that I recommended and it turned out beautiful. Have gotten a lot of referral work from it. We did all the walls, layed over the ceilings with 3/8 drywall, did all the woodwork, windows, doors, & installed crown molding throughout. They had bought the house to flip but love the results so much that they are giving the house to one of their kids to keep it in their family. The overall cost was much cheaper than a full gut and redo and the place looks brand new. I am fully confident that the system that we used will last for many many years.
That's a plan I could get behind. Why put all that time and money into prep? Just cover it and basically start fresh.
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Old 07-23-2015, 07:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JIM MAC View Post
You will definitely want to use a oil base product or shellac base to seal down the surface. Once you have the surface sealed you can then use drywall texture and a water base product to finish. I have done what you are doing before and had pretty good luck. But I will say the best would be to go to the studs and start new. That's not to cost effective. Best of luck
Did you read the posts above???

GARDZ all the way, no need at all for oil and or shellac
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:08 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
Did you read the posts above???

GARDZ all the way, no need at all for oil and or shellac
+1 for Draw-tite or gardz.

Shellac is NOT appropriate.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lambrecht
I did one last summer which was in far worse condition than what you are dealing with using the system that I recommended and it turned out beautiful. Have gotten a lot of referral work from it. We did all the walls, layed over the ceilings with 3/8 drywall, did all the woodwork, windows, doors, & installed crown molding throughout. They had bought the house to flip but love the results so much that they are giving the house to one of their kids to keep it in their family. The overall cost was much cheaper than a full gut and redo and the place looks brand new. I am fully confident that the system that we used will last for many many years.
Your previous post recommends knockdown, which will suffice IF the HO's like knockdown and not smooth walls.

Another solution I've mentioned before is one of the Flexi-Wall products, one of which being Faster Plaster. An experienced installer will be needed.



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Old 07-24-2015, 12:47 AM   #14
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Original plan was to layover the lids and walls. I asked the HO of i could do a sample wall of knockdown for them to try to keep cost down. After they seen the sample wall they loved the look and decided to do the whole house. They have flipped 15+ homes in the past and this one turned out to be one of their favorites.
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