Painting Block Wall - Efflorescence - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum > Professional Painters > Surface Preparation and Application

Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By kmp
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-04-2019, 01:22 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 6
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View jeremyjohnolson's Photo Album My Photos
Default Painting Block Wall - Efflorescence

I pressure washed my block wall and after I pressure washed, there appears to be efflorescence on the block. You should be able to see what I am talking about in the pictures attached, it's the white stuff on the block. I am not 100% sure it is efflorescence I am just guessing that's what it is from what I gather in my research online over the past few days.

What has me confused is that it seems like from what I have read that efflorescence is more of a build up over time and it is something that is hardened onto/into the block, but what you see in the pictures I have only came immediately after, and as it seems as a result of, pressure washing and it is not hardened onto the block but rather a fine powdery dust that can be brushed off. The dust is embedded into the block in spots, especially the lower portion, so it is a little more difficult than just simply sweeping it away, but regardless it is not a hard crystal, it is just a powdery substance.

I pressure washed with my water supply that goes through my water softener which might add salt to the water, so I wonder if it is from that. If this is the cased, then should I just pressure wash again but this time bypass the water softener (we have really hard water in Phoenix, AZ).

Another possibility is could it be existing embedded salt just working it's way to the surface as a result of the pressure washing, in which case I may want to just simply keep pressure washing until the efflorescence stops showing up after it dries?

Or maybe I am totally off track with any of my above ideas. Can someone please chime in and help me know how to prep the surface best so I can get this fence painting so that the paint will stick?

P.S. The darker color on the bottom is just the color of the unpainted block, it's not mold or mildew. This is an existing wall, about 15 years old that was painted a long time ago. The paint on the bottom of the wall was peeling up which is why I decided to repaint. When I pressure washed the bottom of the wall, the paint just blew right off and so that's why you see the darker color of the block on the bottom section. I pressure washed the top portion of the fence just as much as the bottom of the fence, it's just that the paint did not blow off the top like it did on the bottom.

Oh yeah, also, the neighbor's yard is slightly lower than mine, yes, lower, not higher. I say this because I think the pictures my lead someone to believe that the neighbor's dirt line is higher up and there is moisture seeping through at the level where the paint was peeling, but the strange thing is that this is not the reality since the level on the other side of the fence is actually lower.

One more edit: So I just got a call from the local paint store who I showed pictures to and they said to just wait a month or so until it heats up here in Phoenix, AZ. They said that due to the cold weather we have had the past few weeks (well, cold for Phoenix at least, it's all relative) that it is bringing out the efflorescence and that when it heats up it will go away. Does this sound correct to you all out there on this forum?
Attached Thumbnails
Painting Block Wall - Efflorescence-img_20190302_102458.jpg  

Painting Block Wall - Efflorescence-img_20190302_102539.jpg  


Last edited by jeremyjohnolson; 03-04-2019 at 01:40 PM..
jeremyjohnolson is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PaintTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-04-2019, 07:25 PM   #2
kmp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montrose Colorado
Posts: 1,365
Rewards Points: 2,154
Thanks: 133
Thanked 550 Times in 398 Posts
View kmp's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Water is wicking up from the ground into the block and causing the chemicals in cement and even the aggregate in the block to leech out and cause the efflorescence. Pressure washing gets rid of the dirt and debris but you need to wash it with muriatic acid then rinse then use a masonry conditioner like loxon from S/W and then paint. It will come back.
kmp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2019, 12:59 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 6
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View jeremyjohnolson's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmp View Post
Water is wicking up from the ground into the block and causing the chemicals in cement and even the aggregate in the block to leech out and cause the efflorescence. Pressure washing gets rid of the dirt and debris but you need to wash it with muriatic acid then rinse then use a masonry conditioner like loxon from S/W and then paint. It will come back.
Thanks for the reply. Is there any type of paint you know of that is waterproof/resistant that would do better in this situation? Or any way to seal the lower block at least?
jeremyjohnolson is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-05-2019, 06:44 PM   #4
kmp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montrose Colorado
Posts: 1,365
Rewards Points: 2,154
Thanks: 133
Thanked 550 Times in 398 Posts
View kmp's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Nothing will be 100% but UGL makes a below grade basement paint that might work but I have not used it.
kmp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2019, 09:41 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
View JMoorhouse's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Water is transferring from the ground and that liquid will transport salt and other minerals to the surface as it escapes. My solution is the past has been to remove the salt deposits and then seal the block with a 100% siloxane which will prevent the water from escaping on the surface. I have performed work in arizona and the soil is full of clay and will continue to wick minerals.

Google Prosoco Siloxane. I don't have enough credibility on this site to post a link! But yet I've been painting for 20 years at Moorhouse Coating!
This is the product we have used as a company to eliminate 99% of efflorescent mineral deposits.
JMoorhouse is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to JMoorhouse For This Useful Post:
jeremyjohnolson (03-06-2019)
Old 03-06-2019, 03:01 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 6
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
View jeremyjohnolson's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMoorhouse View Post
Water is transferring from the ground and that liquid will transport salt and other minerals to the surface as it escapes. My solution is the past has been to remove the salt deposits and then seal the block with a 100% siloxane which will prevent the water from escaping on the surface. I have performed work in arizona and the soil is full of clay and will continue to wick minerals.

Google Prosoco Siloxane. I don't have enough credibility on this site to post a link! But yet I've been painting for 20 years at Moorhouse Coating!
This is the product we have used as a company to eliminate 99% of efflorescent mineral deposits.
Awesome! You have been a great help. What you are saying makes sense. So I am only painting my side of the fence. I am assuming that using the siloxane will still work just the same if used on only one side, correct?

Also, would you recommend sealing the block all the way to the top, or just the lower portion where the problem exists? If painted over, will it result in a different look where the sealant is versus where it is not?

Last edited by jeremyjohnolson; 03-06-2019 at 03:03 PM..
jeremyjohnolson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Painting an interior sand and cement stove surround wall and fixing up a ceiling [email protected] General Painting Discussion 2 02-15-2019 06:34 PM
Painting Exterior Vinyl and Aluminum trim and basement wall cardgunner General Painting Discussion 4 09-26-2017 04:02 AM
Painting wall above baseboard and door jambs. iPaintArizona General Painting Discussion 8 08-07-2016 04:58 PM
How do I prevent flashing??? abldwn General Painting Discussion 50 05-12-2016 09:55 PM
Efflorescence on block walls in basement paintnow Surface Preparation and Application 3 03-01-2016 04:34 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com