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Old 07-06-2018, 09:56 AM   #1
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Default rusty nails

How do you deal with rusty nails on siding and window trim? I'm bidding on a job where every single nail is rusty and visible. Does anyone have a fast system or solution? I plan on using an acrylic paint or stain. I was thinking about dabbing each nail head with an oil-based primer with one of those round (pencil type) paint brushes. The question is which exterior oil based primer will seal rust?

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Old 07-06-2018, 11:38 AM   #2
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I use BIN and never had a problem but people on here have said not to because it dries to hard .I would think a Alkyd based " rusty metal " primer would work also .
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Old 07-06-2018, 12:03 PM   #3
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I use BIN and never had a problem but people on here have said not to because it dries to hard .I would think a Alkyd based " rusty metal " primer would work also .
BIN is an interior primer. Yeah, I'll look for a quart of a rust primer It has to stick not only to metal but to wood as well. I've never looked for such a primer at the paint store.
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Old 07-06-2018, 12:14 PM   #4
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Here is an older thread but I don't see a good solution. Many say it is a band-aid solution that will eventually fail. Even the auto body guys do not guarantee rust not returning and they grind it down to the fresh metal.

I think I'll just spot prime the rusted nail heads with a rust oil primer. That may last a few years, who knows. The trouble is if I tell the homeowner it is only a temporary fix they will find some painter who will lie to them.

https://www.painttalk.com/f6/rusty-n...r-claps-27268/

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Old 07-06-2018, 12:34 PM   #5
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BIN is an interior primer. Yeah, I'll look for a quart of a rust primer It has to stick not only to metal but to wood as well. I've never looked for such a primer at the paint store.
Look on the can of BIN It says can be used for spot priming exterior
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Old 07-06-2018, 03:56 PM   #6
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You could dab some OSPHO rust converter on the rusty nail heads before using a rust primer and then topcoating. Ace Hardware carries it. I've used it on a galvanized aluminum shed next door and, after 6 years, I see no evidence of any rust formation on the problem areas.


The chemical process which occurs when using the OSPHO takes place quickly. You will see the rust turn black. OSPHO transforms rust into iron phosphate, an inert substance. Then it's time for the other steps. Depending upon the build-up of rust, two coats may be necessary (I did not need a 2nd application). The makers of OSPHO recommend letting it dry overnight, but I'm not sure that is necessary this time of year. They also recommend using oil primers and topcoats over it, but I think if you oil prime over it you could safely use an acrylic topcoat.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:36 PM   #7
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You could dab some OSPHO rust converter on the rusty nail heads before using a rust primer and then topcoating. Ace Hardware carries it. I've used it on a galvanized aluminum shed next door and, after 6 years, I see no evidence of any rust formation on the problem areas.


The chemical process which occurs when using the OSPHO takes place quickly. You will see the rust turn black. OSPHO transforms rust into iron phosphate, an inert substance. Then it's time for the other steps. Depending upon the build-up of rust, two coats may be necessary (I did not need a 2nd application). The makers of OSPHO recommend letting it dry overnight, but I'm not sure that is necessary this time of year. They also recommend using oil primers and topcoats over it, but I think if you oil prime over it you could safely use an acrylic topcoat.
I've used those converters on my rusting car when I was young (several times) and they didn't work for me. Besides, I have about 500 nails heads to spot prime and that liquid is too drippy. Who knows if paint would adhere after it drips onto the wood. I'm also going up 28' on a ladder and the wind may catch it. I don't want any drips on the vinyl siding. I'm painting the trim boards only.

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Old 07-06-2018, 06:47 PM   #8
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Has anyone tried using Mad Dog primer for rust? Call me skeptical.

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Old 07-06-2018, 06:59 PM   #9
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Here's a video that describes the problem in detail. Again, he offers no permanent solution.

What idiot would NOT use galvanized nails? Unreal

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Old 07-06-2018, 07:50 PM   #10
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I used Mad Dog on a metal garage door. Many attemps to keep the rust away for many years. It is the only thing that worked. It does require 2 coats to keep the rust away.

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Old 07-06-2018, 09:00 PM   #11
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I have not used mad dog much, but the little I have used it I liked it. It seems to work really well, might be worth a try...

My prefered method of fixing rusty nails or other rusty metals, is to rusty metal prime it, then prime it with clean metal primer or with an exterior oil like coverstain. This prevents the color of the rusty metal primer from bleeding through the paint. Most primers, even stain blocking ones have a hard time blocking rust.
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Old 07-06-2018, 10:50 PM   #12
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Old 07-07-2018, 04:02 PM   #13
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Unfortunately, I haven't seen that primer in Canada. I'm still dubious that it will seal the rust for more than a year. All my paint reps say this as well.
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Old 07-07-2018, 04:06 PM   #14
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A Benjamin Moore paint rep said that Flood "Penetrol" might work. It is used for rust.

I probably have 2-3 quarts of Penetrol from about 10 years ago when that was THE additive to use for oil-based paints. I'll bet it's still good to use. Reading the PDF, they use Penetrol to restore fibreglass.

http://sevenspaint.com/docs/tds/Flood%20Penetrol.pdf
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Old 07-07-2018, 08:05 PM   #15
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What about a hit of Tremclad rust primer spray, it's till holding out on the bottom of what had been my rusting iron bathtub.
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Old 07-09-2018, 01:19 PM   #16
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On the rare exterior we do we spray every rusty nail head with a shot of coverstain alkyd primer from a rattle can before any prep work is done. If you don't do that the rust will come through ANY water based material you put on it. This includes wood filler, spackle paste, and acrylic paint. They do make some solvent based spackle so that might work. The rattle can of coverstain is cheaper.
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Old 07-11-2018, 04:43 PM   #17
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I also use rattle can, but I get the rusty metal primer from the auto parts store.

Never had any problems.
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Old 07-12-2018, 08:41 PM   #18
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Depends on why they're rusted. Sometimes all they need is a little caulk, sometimes I hit em with rust reformer (its black) and then CS (or fill in with white bomb an primer here) to bring the color back some...

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Old 08-26-2018, 09:48 PM   #19
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I've spotted with Zinnsers rusty metal primer and it seems to work great.Like Mr.Smith said Bin can be used to spot prime on exteriors.Used that method on rusty nail heads about fours or so yrs. ago on a house before using their rusty metal primer.I need to follow up on that place and see how its holding up.
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Old 08-27-2018, 09:20 PM   #20
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...the far end would be a converter>oil prime>2 coats quality top...often 1-2 coats of an quality oil prime under good paint will do the trick...at leave get them as stable and clean (alcohol wipes and dry) as you can before sealing...
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