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Old 11-04-2019, 09:44 PM   #1
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Default wood panel knot filling/ latex paint over wood panel

My client would like her wood paneled living room painted. Its not the cheap flimsy wood paneling , its real wood with some kind of urethane clear coat finish.
She wants me to try and fill the knots and smooth it out the best I can.
I am wondering if anyone here has done anything like his before and what sort of of filler compound is going to give me the best results? I usually use a lightweight sparkle for patching and filling holes, put I am thinking there is probably a better wood filler product that would work better here?

Also. Any tips for getting a good latex coat on it would be appreciated as well. Do I need a special primer for covering the clear coat /polyurethane?
thanks
I cant get my photo editor to work at the moment but it looks sort of like this.
https://imgur.com/KTpas1R

EDIT: Yes I should have done this first , but a quick search got me a few older threads discussing a similar project. BIN and Joint compound? They have requested that I roll it instead of spraying , even if it takes longer. Am I going to have to sand it all?
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Old 11-04-2019, 11:47 PM   #2
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The first thing I would do is wipe the paneling down with mineral spirits. Good chance it has seen Murphy's Oil soap or some other type of product that could cause problems when painting. It may not be necessary, but is cheap insurance when painting paneling.

It would be a good idea to give it a light sanding to gain a little tooth and smooth things out. A pole sander can make quick work of the large areas, with a sanding sponge being employed for the groves and mouldings.

I'd prefer something like MH Ready Patch over joint compound for filler. MH is less likely to crack. A coat of bin (might want to spot prime the knots first, so they have 2 BIN coats) followed by 2 coats of the paint of choice, and it's a done deal.

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Old 11-05-2019, 07:21 AM   #3
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Ready patch gives a very nice surface.

I would clean, scuff, BIN, then fill and caulk, and spot prime the filled spots with bin again.
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Old 11-05-2019, 01:35 PM   #4
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Yep. Definitely gotta BIN that knotty pine. I find any of those light weight fillers are great.
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Old 11-05-2019, 02:21 PM   #5
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I did a similar job for a friend a few years ago. He was selling his house and quickly wanted to paint all of the wood paneling in the basement. We didnít do any prep other than asking and sprayed everything with Cover Stain. BIN would also work well.

We didnít fill any of the knot holes, but if we did I would use Elmers Wood Filler.
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Old 11-05-2019, 02:57 PM   #6
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I would clean it thoroughly like Lighteningboy said. For the knots I would use Durabond. It sticks like crazy to most surfaces.

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Old 11-05-2019, 04:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by futtyos View Post
I would clean it thoroughly like Lighteningboy said. For the knots I would use Durabond. It sticks like crazy to most surfaces.

futtyos
If I were going to use joint compound, Durabond is the one I would choose. Of all joint compounds it would be the least likely to crack. For the small amount needed, I think MH Ready Patch would offer a bit more crack resistance and
unlike Durabond you wouldn't need to mix it. But either product would work.
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Old 11-05-2019, 08:18 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finishesbykevyn View Post
Yep. Definitely gotta BIN that knotty pine. I find any of those light weight fillers are great.
It makes me feel nostalgic to hear Kevyn talk about BIN primer!

You need to ask yourself a few questions:
Am I worried about Tanin Bleed, soot, nicotine, or other stains showing through the finish product? Am I worried about adhesion? Do I want to experience a Jimi Hendrix level ‘high’?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, BIN is appropriate.
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Old 11-05-2019, 08:37 PM   #9
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For something like that Iíd clean and scuff sand, skip any filling, and just put a thinned evenly applied coat of 024 primer in a darker accent color allowing some of the undertones to photograph through the primer and clear it with a Uralkyd matte. I like the character of bleed through on knots as well as some of the wood tones showing through, providing a primitive rustic look with a bit of complexity to it.
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Old 11-06-2019, 09:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holland View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by finishesbykevyn View Post
Yep. Definitely gotta BIN that knotty pine. I find any of those light weight fillers are great.
It makes me feel nostalgic to hear Kevyn talk about BIN primer!

You need to ask yourself a few questions:
Am I worried about Tanin Bleed, soot, nicotine, or other stains showing through the finish product? Am I worried about adhesion? Do I want to experience a Jimi Hendrix level ‘high’?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, BIN is appropriate.
Haha. I'm am definitely a new big time lover of BIN. It should just be called problem solver
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