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Old 03-24-2019, 12:54 PM   #1
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Default Analine Dye Advice Please

Anyone have a brand they prefer? I'm probably going to be removing a clear coat from some solid maple cabinetry and thinking of dying it blue.

Tips? Warnings?
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Old 03-24-2019, 01:38 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by fauxlynn View Post
Anyone have a brand they prefer? I'm probably going to be removing a clear coat from some solid maple cabinetry and thinking of dying it blue.

Tips? Warnings?
I had great success removing old paint using "Contractors Solvent" by De-Solv-it.
In one project working in a heritage house I needed to remove some paint from a stair post, sanding was not really good option because of dust even using vacuum cleaner assisted sander and using regular paint remover was not a good option due to the smell so I decided to give "Contractors Solvent" a try.
Applied with a cloth (reapplied 3 or 4 times) and after 30 minutes I was able to scrape off 6 or 7 layers of old paint to the original wood.
Being a heritage house some of that paint was oil of course other layers were latex.
I was very impressed with that product.
Also great to clean your hands.

On another project metal door was painted with latex (with no primer underneath).
In some places paint was stuck quite good in others (especially around the door handle) was peeling more easily.
I applied "Contractors Solvent" 4 or 5 times with a cloth and after 45 minutes scraped off the old pain with ease.


From their website:
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A heavy duty degreaser and concrete cleaner; itís even safe on vehicles, laundry, skin and hair! No harmful vapors, benzene or chlorinated solvents.
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Old 03-24-2019, 01:49 PM   #3
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Hey there new to PT guy! So, I’m already certain how I will remove the clear coat. This snob is going to use her fancy Festool. I was really looking for tips, etc on aniline dyes.

Good luck here and thanks for your otherwise helpful info.
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Old 03-24-2019, 02:16 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by fauxlynn View Post
Hey there new to PT guy! So, I’m already certain how I will remove the clear coat. This snob is going to use her fancy Festool. I was really looking for tips, etc on aniline dyes.

Good luck here and thanks for your otherwise helpful info.
Wow, Thanks for clarifying, because reading title of your thread I got worried...lol
"Analine Dye"
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Old 03-24-2019, 02:22 PM   #5
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Oh crap. Guess I spelled something incorrectly again. I’ve been on Reddit all day where everyone prefaces their thoughts with ANAL (am not a lawyer).
Sorry about that.
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Old 03-24-2019, 02:31 PM   #6
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The only issue using water based dyes is that they have no binder so you have to be careful top coating with water based finishes and they dry really fast so I never had luck getting an even finish. That's probably one area that oil based stains are superior. I stick with acetate based dyes if using them at all or general finishes water based dyes stain.

Wood whisperer had a great video
https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/you-and-dye/

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Old 03-24-2019, 02:56 PM   #7
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Thanks for the link ccmn. I’ll probably just end up thinning some thalo blue tube oil into some thinner.
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Old 03-24-2019, 02:57 PM   #8
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Sounds like a cool project!

My preference for aniline dyes is W.D. Lockwood. I use them often on species prone to blotching such as maple and birch, especially when doing flooring. They provide unrivaled uniformity and color saturation w/out blotching or obscuring the figure. I believe W.D. Lockwood has a water soluble metal complex dye in a blue. I havenít tried the blues but have used some of their other metal complex dyes with terrific results. One thing to make note of is color fastness. If exposed to moderate to extreme UV light, aniline dyes will fade much quicker than pigmented stains, metal complex dyes having better color fastness than straight up anilines. When dyeing maple I do a wet on wet application, getting a couple of square feet ahead of myself then going back and quickly rewetting it, keeping two open wet edges, the first opens the grain, the second penetrates. Anilines and metal complex dyes are unforgiving if there is the slightest residual finish in the pores. The dye wonít penetrate and then youíve got a bit of a problem. When dyeing, if you run into that situation, keep a piece of sandpaper handy and quickly work the wet dye into the wood. Also make note that you will have to alternate solvents when clear finishing. If using a water dye you will need to use a solvent based sealer, if using an alcohol dye avoid using an alcohol soluble sealer such as shellac.

You also might want to look into NGR dyes.
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Old 03-24-2019, 03:04 PM   #9
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I’m reading about those right now. It’s a kitchen cabinet job, not until summer. I need to nail down exactly the colorant to use.
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Old 03-24-2019, 03:04 PM   #10
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duplicate
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Old 03-24-2019, 03:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Sounds like a cool project!

My preference for aniline dyes is W.D. Lockwood. I use them often on species prone to blotching such as maple and birch, especially when doing flooring. They provide unrivaled uniformity and color saturation w/out blotching or obscuring the figure. I believe W.D. Lockwood has a water soluble metal complex dye in a blue. I havenít tried the blues but have used some of their other metal complex dyes with terrific results. One thing to make note of is color fastness. If exposed to moderate to extreme UV light, aniline dyes will fade much quicker than pigmented stains, metal complex dyes having better color fastness than straight up anilines. When dyeing maple I do a wet on wet application, getting a couple of square feet ahead of myself then going back and quickly rewetting it, keeping two open wet edges, the first opens the grain, the second penetrates. Anilines and metal complex dyes are unforgiving if there is the slightest residual finish in the pores. The dye wonít penetrate and then youíve got a bit of a problem. When dyeing, if you run into that situation, keep a piece of sandpaper handy and quickly work the wet dye into the wood. Also make note that you will have to alternate solvents when clear finishing. If using a water dye you will need to use a solvent based sealer, if using an alcohol dye avoid using an alcohol soluble sealer such as shellac.

You also might want to look into NGR dyes.
Great very useful info.
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Old 05-29-2019, 04:58 PM   #12
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I've been doing quite a lot of testing with different color dyes for some upcoming projects.
Some research I've read mentions caution for the blushing with maple and stains, using a very light coat of shellac to prevent it etc, just a minor warning.

I'm not sure on long-term results, but I've gotten great color from Most of the dyes I've tested, to be honest. To get really solid color a second coat actually helped.
Offhand I can recall:
Keda Dye, Transtint, and plain old Rit. I have several more but will need to check when I get back to the shop.

Like anything though, get some scraps and test test test. THis is a pretty easy one at least, wipe, wipe off, wait a few, no gun to clean!
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Old 06-01-2019, 03:37 PM   #13
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Thanks for your insight
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:16 PM   #14
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Default Dye's tested

FolkArt Ultra Dye (purple, infra red, agent orange, comes in quite a few colors)
This was good for a rich, deep color. You can still see grain, but did well
at making the test (birch) solid purple orange or red. I'd assume the blue
would as well
Keda Dye (liquid red/crimson)
This also did a solid color well. Not a tint but a fullon dye. Still some figure
but very red.
K.E. Moser's (aniline gray)
Likely just an issue with the gray, but it just did a "graying" not a full gray
dye. Very useful for some things but not if you just want a gray dye. Was
not very noticable with water nor alcohol. I DO want to try again when I
have time though, not convinced there isn't a better way to use. Soak?
Rit (both the "synthetic" and normal clothes variety)
I had this around so just tried. Did a rather good job of attaining solid
color.

like I said, most worked pretty well. My judgement is still out on the Moser's, didn't spend much effort on working out why it didn't do much. Same with the alumilite black/gray, just didn't seem to go in much.

Humorously ALL of them worked much deeper than the minwax "true black", it barely left a shadow.

of course for black, nothing really beat the "rusty vinegar water" ie old nails in vinegar for a couple days, wipe it on the wood. Except maybe wiping tea on first (tannins), or following with straight-up india ink.

Hope this helps a little.

Of course, Try it yourself and make sure it's what you want
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlWood View Post
K.E. Moser's (aniline gray)
Likely just an issue with the gray, but it just did a "graying" not a full gray
dye. Very useful for some things but not if you just want a gray dye. Was
not very noticable with water nor alcohol. I DO want to try again when I
have time though, not convinced there isn't a better way to use. Soak?
I’m pretty certain that the J.E. Moser’s aniline dyes are W.D.Lockwood repackaged/rebranded just as several other house brands are. If you’re at a dead end with the grays, a way to achieve a really nice weathered/driftwood gray effect is to bleach the wood first (hydrogen peroxide in basic solution) and then apply a very dilute application of the J.E. Moser’s or W.D. Lockwood silver gray water dye. It looks really nice on rustic grade white oak. Also try bleaching followed by Woca Grey Lye, diluting the grey lye a bit with vinegar, knocking back the pH a bit. That too provides an authentic looking/beautiful weathered gray look. The grays are my biggest sellers.

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Old Yesterday, 11:26 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemy Redux View Post
Iím pretty certain that the J.E. Moserís aniline dyes are W.D.Lockwood repackaged/rebranded just as several other house brands are. If youíre at a dead end with the grays, a way to achieve a really nice weathered/driftwood gray effect is to bleach the wood first (hydrogen peroxide in basic solution) and then apply a very dilute application of the J.E. Moserís or W.D. Lockwood silver gray water dye. It looks really nice on rustic grade white oak. Also try bleaching followed by Woca Grey Lye, diluting the grey lye a bit with vinegar, knocking back the pH a bit. That too provides an authentic looking/beautiful weathered gray look. The grays are my biggest sellers.
Oh, the Moser's would probably work Fine for weathered/driftwood gray. Issue is I'm not looking for that whatsoever lol

I'm trying to find dyes not stains, trying to change to color of the wood, while still leaving the figure. Paint completely covers, where a dye contains both the color and the interest of figure in the wood.

Some customers like the natural of the figure, but don't want the rustic of bare wood grain. Or something.
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Old Yesterday, 08:43 PM   #17
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Oh, the Moser's would probably work Fine for weathered/driftwood gray. Issue is I'm not looking for that whatsoever lol

I'm trying to find dyes not stains, trying to change to color of the wood, while still leaving the figure. Paint completely covers, where a dye contains both the color and the interest of figure in the wood.

Some customers like the natural of the figure, but don't want the rustic of bare wood grain. Or something.
I strictly utilize chemical and molecular dying principles without the use of pigments as well. Iíve also had good success in achieving the darker grays without the use of pigments, the Moserís only providing a subtle hint of gray as you mentioned.
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