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Old 11-07-2019, 12:03 AM   #41
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Around here, we used to use a lot of spray stains, but everyone has moved away from them unless absolutely needed.

Usually, when I need a spray stain or toner, I make my own from TransTint dyes.
I just bought a new wood bedroom set and the finisher used a dye stain. It looks really uniform for Alder.
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Old 11-07-2019, 10:16 AM   #42
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I use dyes and chemical reagents pretty much exclusively. They provide unrivaled clarity and uniformity without obscuring the figure, enhancing the natural beauty of wood rather than concealing it. The only time I use pigmented stains is to UV protect some dyes that are prone to fading when subjected to UV light, or to color match applied moldings on factory finished window or millwork packs that were colored by the fabricators utilizing pigmented stains.

As far a clear waterborne finish for tabletops, I had stopped by a project yesterday where I had refinished a white oak kitchen dining tabletop with Target Coatings EM 8000 CV this past February just to see how the finish was faring. The tableís been subjected to heavy daily use since being placed into service. I utilized a matte sheen and was concerned that the finish would develop burnishing/marring from items being slid across the top cross-grain. Upon close inspection the top has held up beautifully with not even the slightest bit of marring.

As far as the testing that one self identified composition-nerd mentioned (got a kick out of that), testing has always been a critical part of my operations, especially with finishing costs of some of the millwork & trim packs for a single home easily drifting into the several hundred thousand dollar range, taking only ďoneĒ catastrophic finish failure to literally wipe me out, most GL policies not providing error and omissions coverage for something of that nature. Itís often difficult to proceed with confidence that PPD mentioned without testing based on what seems to be the ever changing reformulations to reduce VOCs, often placing the finisher at risk. When suggesting finishes here at PT Iíll often include that itís always best to test for yourself based on subjected use and exposures, and to CYA by including the can and cannot(s) as to what the finishes can be subjected to as well as cleaning and maintenance requirements, all the above mentioned being written into the contracts.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:51 PM   #43
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This table I did, believe it or not, with Minwax Polyshades. The whole thing was sanded to 100% bare wood, and the prestain conditioner was used. The sanding was a little nuts, as kids we kind of destroyed our table a bit putting rocks on it and carving stuff in it and all that. Eventually I think one day my sister spilled acetone on it and it started peeling the varnish with it. It spent years covered with tablecloths after. (We're both in our 20s now.) So while my mom was gone me and her sanded it down, starting with 40 grit just down to 220. I wish I did a final sand with 400 grit or so, as really close up you can see some problems if you're a meticulous painter, but overall it's a big transformation and my family's extremely happy with it, and the Polyshades has held up very well to basically everything, and I clean it with straight ammonia.

I kind of don't get why Polyshades is actually knocked so much as a product. I feel like if you do the work, it works. It's extremely good for stuff that otherwise wouldn't be economical to completely strip, but you still want looking better, especially using the Espresso color.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:03 PM   #44
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I use dyes and chemical reagents pretty much exclusively. They provide unrivaled clarity and uniformity without obscuring the figure, enhancing the natural beauty of wood rather than concealing it. The only time I use pigmented stains is to UV protect some dyes that are prone to fading when subjected to UV light, or to color match applied moldings on factory finished window or millwork packs that were colored by the fabricators utilizing pigmented stains.



As far a clear waterborne finish for tabletops, I had stopped by a project yesterday where I had refinished a white oak kitchen dining tabletop with Target Coatings EM 8000 CV this past February just to see how the finish was faring. The tableís been subjected to heavy daily use since being placed into service. I utilized a matte sheen and was concerned that the finish would develop burnishing/marring from items being slid across the top cross-grain. Upon close inspection the top has held up beautifully with not even the slightest bit of marring.



As far as the testing that one self identified composition-nerd mentioned (got a kick out of that), testing has always been a critical part of my operations, especially with finishing costs of some of the millwork & trim packs for a single home easily drifting into the several hundred thousand dollar range, taking only ďoneĒ catastrophic finish failure to literally wipe me out, most GL policies not providing error and omissions coverage for something of that nature. Itís often difficult to proceed with confidence that PPD mentioned without testing based on what seems to be the ever changing reformulations to reduce VOCs, often placing the finisher at risk. When suggesting finishes here at PT Iíll often include that itís always best to test for yourself based on subjected use and exposures, and to CYA by including the can and cannot(s) as to what the finishes can be subjected to as well as cleaning and maintenance requirements, all the above mentioned being written into the contracts.


Wow the EM 8000 in a flat has held up to table use without any burnishing?! Thats impressive! Iíve been hesitant to get into them since u mentioned they discontinued your favorite & then watching some testing videos that left me deflated.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:19 AM   #45
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Wow the EM 8000 in a flat has held up to table use without any burnishing?! Thats impressive! Iíve been hesitant to get into them since u mentioned they discontinued your favorite & then watching some testing videos that left me deflated.
In anticipation of it burnishing I ended up bringing up the sheen level a bit with a little hand work. Anything below a 23% sheen level is a little sketchy for a tabletop no matter what finish is used. It really worked out well.
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