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Old 03-18-2018, 10:28 PM   #1
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Default Priming procedures

What's your procedure for priming your cabinet doors? I find mine varies depending on the job. On the varnished honey oak cabinets, I'll spray and back roll Stix with a Wizz roller to work paint into the grains. This particular job, I'm painting black cabinets to an off white.
I've been quickly brushing the tight inside corners and then just spraying 1 good fog coat.
I've heard that cabinet shops are spraying 2 and 3 coats of primer prior to topcoating, but I imagine most of us would prefer to get away with 1 coat of primer..
I'm mostly using Stix and then just spraying 2 coats of BM Advance for my top coat..
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Old 03-19-2018, 08:30 AM   #2
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might I add, that my reasoning for brushing the detailed corners first, is that I find the sprayer wants to miss alot of areas on the first pass. Holidays if you will. This way way I can atleast jam some paint in those areas without getting too much build up from multiple passes. Anyone else do this?
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Old 03-19-2018, 09:46 PM   #3
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Im huge into removing the previous finish and using oil primer. I dont do a lot of painted cabinets anymore, mostly white lacquer or stain/lacquer. But I like to strip the cabinets to the wood, fill any grain or holes, then shoot two-coats of Sherwins Easy Sand Primer with sanding in between each coat. Following the priming and sanding I usually lay two coats of ProClassic Oil or Durapoxy.
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Old 03-19-2018, 10:11 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ThreeSistersPainting View Post
Im huge into removing the previous finish and using oil primer. I dont do a lot of painted cabinets anymore, mostly white lacquer or stain/lacquer. But I like to strip the cabinets to the wood, fill any grain or holes, then shoot two-coats of Sherwins Easy Sand Primer with sanding in between each coat. Following the priming and sanding I usually lay two coats of ProClassic Oil or Durapoxy.
Wow. Interesting. Sounds time consuming. Hats off to you that people are paying for that procedure. Don't take this the wrong way, but would it be just as cost worthy to buy new doors? How much time are you spending on each door? Are you stripping the bases as well.? Thanks for sharing.
You must also have a good ventilation system on the go using oil products. .��
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Old 03-21-2018, 12:20 AM   #5
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I finish the doors/drawers at my shop and booth the kitchen off with an inlet and outlet fan with filter (box fan and furnace filter). If I start on a Monday it will take me the day to remove doors/drawers and mask a booth. I'll usually spend that evening sanding half the doors followed by sanding the boxes and finishing the door load Tuesday. On Wednesday I prime (Easy Sand Primer recoats in an hour, easily spray 2-3 coats in a day), First top coat Thursday with the finish coat on Friday. Then I usually ask to install on Saturdays.

My going rate is $70/Hr since I am a one man show, if I put 48 Hours into a kitchen set that would equate to $3360 for labor with roughly $400 in material. My bid sits on average around $3760
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:04 AM   #6
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Quote:
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I finish the doors/drawers at my shop and booth the kitchen off with an inlet and outlet fan with filter (box fan and furnace filter). If I start on a Monday it will take me the day to remove doors/drawers and mask a booth. I'll usually spend that evening sanding half the doors followed by sanding the boxes and finishing the door load Tuesday. On Wednesday I prime (Easy Sand Primer recoats in an hour, easily spray 2-3 coats in a day), First top coat Thursday with the finish coat on Friday. Then I usually ask to install on Saturdays.

My going rate is $70/Hr since I am a one man show, if I put 48 Hours into a kitchen set that would equate to $3360 for labor with roughly $400 in material. My bid sits on average around $3760
That's great if you can get that price, not so much if you can't!
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Old 03-21-2018, 07:46 PM   #7
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I am considered the cheaper route here in Bend. The housing market is inflated here so construction prices are up. There are two franchises that offer re-finshing and re-facing in town, from what I have heard from customers who have dealt with them their re-finishing process is upwards in the $4-7k and re-face is around $7-10k.

This is of course painting cabinets, I usually push customers to either white lacquer or stain/lacquer which are trendy and have a better warranty than paint (better investment in the long run if they sell) vs their choice of color on painted cabinets that usually are considered a fad (Red, Blue, Green will never stay in style)
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:17 PM   #8
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I am considered the cheaper route here in Bend. The housing market is inflated here so construction prices are up. There are two franchises that offer re-finshing and re-facing in town, from what I have heard from customers who have dealt with them their re-finishing process is upwards in the $4-7k and re-face is around $7-10k.

This is of course painting cabinets, I usually push customers to either white lacquer or stain/lacquer which are trendy and have a better warranty than paint (better investment in the long run if they sell) vs their choice of color on painted cabinets that usually are considered a fad (Red, Blue, Green will never stay in style)
Honestly I think your price is right on par. I usually do a per door price. Like $80-100/ door.
So a full kitchen is running between 2700 -4000.
I just don't want to work with lacquers anymore. Even though I know it's tough as nails and has its advantages.
I guess double priming everything would eliminate any holidays in the corners. Also any residual tannin bleading. Is that easy sand an oil product too.? Just seems like alot of labour to completely remove the finish. You must work really fast. Haha.
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:20 PM   #9
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https://www.sherwin-williams.com/doc.../035777650318/

Here is the PDS for Sherwins Easy Sand Primer. My festool dts and 6" bosch sanders make the removal quite easy. However I did start out with a dewalt 5" which I still use to this day.

I understand wanting to switch out of lacquers and oil products though, personally I have switched my clears from Rudd Pre-Cat to Rudd NuWave (WB). For me the prep and prime coat is one of the most important steps and I guess I havent found a solid replacement for painted cabinets.
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Old 03-22-2018, 12:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finishesbykevyn View Post
What's your procedure for priming your cabinet doors? I find mine varies depending on the job. On the varnished honey oak cabinets, I'll spray and back roll Stix with a Wizz roller to work paint into the grains. This particular job, I'm painting black cabinets to an off white.
I've been quickly brushing the tight inside corners and then just spraying 1 good fog coat.
I've heard that cabinet shops are spraying 2 and 3 coats of primer prior to topcoating, but I imagine most of us would prefer to get away with 1 coat of primer..
I'm mostly using Stix and then just spraying 2 coats of BM Advance for my top coat..
I do a similar process, except I use BIN first, and backbrush/roll it if its oak. After that, I go ahead and spray a coat of latex wood undercoater, to give it all some build.
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Old 03-22-2018, 07:33 AM   #11
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I do a similar process, except I use BIN first, and backbrush/roll it if its oak. After that, I go ahead and spray a coat of latex wood undercoater, to give it all some build.
Good call on the 2nd coat for build. Makes sense. Also the BIN for Tannins. I'm starting to see the purpose of 2 and 3 coats of primer. ..
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:43 AM   #12
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I do a similar process, except I use BIN first, and backbrush/roll it if its oak. After that, I go ahead and spray a coat of latex wood undercoater, to give it all some build.
Hey Woodco, I'm assuming your using an HVLP for the BIN. What sort of ventilation system do you have on the go for that? If I get into using some of these nastier products, I think I will have to up my ventilation as I only have basically a bathroom type fan for suction at the moment..
It's fine for my waterbased system, but have been asked to start doing some staining, clearcoating and bare wood systems..
Or anyone else who wants to chime on this..
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:08 AM   #13
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Hey Woodco, I'm assuming your using an HVLP for the BIN. What sort of ventilation system do you have on the go for that? If I get into using some of these nastier products, I think I will have to up my ventilation as I only have basically a bathroom type fan for suction at the moment..
It's fine for my waterbased system, but have been asked to start doing some staining, clearcoating and bare wood systems..
Or anyone else who wants to chime on this..
Well, Im usually using it outside spraying doors, and for the inside frames I USUALLY do it by hand. Even if Im going to spray the topcoat, Im usually do the BIN by hand. Its thin enough, and sands easy enough, that it doesnt show any brush or roller marks, and Im usually doing it over oak, so I want to work it into the grain anyway.


However, when I do spray it inside, I dont worry too much about it as its alcohol based, and lets face it..... me and alcohol get along very well. I just put on a respirator instead of a titty-cup. I just spray what I have to, then get out of the area as soon as Im done.

Someone on here turned me on to a box fan with a 24"X24" filter taped to it. Find a window and stick one in there, and seal it off. The filter keeps the dust from getting on the outside of the house. Probably wouldnt be a big deal anyway. You can also use it to collect airborne dust in your tented off area.

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Old 03-30-2018, 11:13 AM   #14
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Well, Im usually using it outside spraying doors, and for the inside frames I USUALLY do it by hand. Even if Im going to spray the topcoat, Im usually do the BIN by hand. Its thin enough, and sands easy enough, that it doesnt show any brush or roller marks, and Im usually doing it over oak, so I want to work it into the grain anyway.


However, when I do spray it inside, I dont worry too much about it as its alcohol based, and lets face it..... me and alcohol get along very well. I just put on a respirator instead of a titty-cup. I just spray what I have to, then get out of the area as soon as Im done.
Haha. Perfect. I should have no issues then.! Can clean my sprayer out with my beer after to right?
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:23 AM   #15
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Haha. Perfect. I should have no issues then.! Can clean my sprayer out with my beer after to right?

Vodka or whiskey would work well.
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:23 AM   #16
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I think you can use ammonia to clean shellac, so you could technically use your pee.
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Old 03-30-2018, 04:21 PM   #17
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I am a big fan of XIM UMA Primer. I usually spray 2 coats of that in the driveway and brush the bodies by hand. Of course I sand between coats. This is after a TSP wash and light sanding with 240 grit. If I have tannin bleed trough on oak I will use BIN but typically it isn't too bad and I can get by with spot priming the bleed with a rattle can. Worst case scenario I break out the cup gun.
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