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· The Long Island Painter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I gave an estimate a month ago and the homeowners were set on Behrs. The man had previously done his own painting and was not bad for a DIY. When he originally asked what I think of the painting I knew he did the work so I responded "Looks like a talented homeowner or a professional that did not have that much experience." He told me he was fussy as he knew paint.
I was able to convice them to ignore consumer reports as my crew has over 1,000 years experience and who would be a better judge of paint. C.R. or my men. They agreed as long as I could match the color. My local paint store matched perfectly and I applied Regal Matte. Before painting, we orbital hepa vac sanded all the walls with 100 git and followed by 220 grit like we do on every job.
yesterday we finished. The man kept looking from 6 inches away. I joked, "hey, even Cindy Crawford has flaws from so close." I heard from him 2 hours ago. He said he could not believe the depth and fullness of the paint job. He wants a stack of cards.
 

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...Before painting, we orbital hepa vac sanded all the walls with 100 git and followed by 220 grit like we do on every job...
I'm often amazed at the different approaches that some painters take. Before every paint job, I quickly sand the walls (by hand) with 100 grit to knock off any "lint buggers" and to locate any repairs that might be needed.

Sanding with a RO sander using 220 grit strikes me as a furniture level prep and above and beyond the call of duty. But hey, it sounds like you're making your customers happy so it must be working.
 

· The Long Island Painter
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396 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm often amazed at the different approaches that some painters take. Before every paint job, I quickly sand the walls (by hand) with 100 grit to knock off any "lint buggers" and to locate any repairs that might be needed.

Sanding with a RO sander using 220 grit strikes me as a furniture level prep and above and beyond the call of duty. But hey, it sounds like you're making your customers happy so it must be working.
I posted a photo of what our walls look like before we paint. Believe it or not my sanding methods take less time than hand or pole sanding, give a much better surface and leave me with no dust to clean up. It gives me an edge on the cheaper guys. I may not be able to do my job at their cheapo price, but they cannot do my job at more than my price. It is all about effeceincy and the correct equipment. I cannot stress the value of the equipment, plus it is RRP compliant. I have gone as far as 400 grit to achieve a spray look and 16 grit to destroy stucco and knock down.
 

· The Long Island Painter
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396 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Fein and the paper is Kligspor or Fein. Does not matter. The sheets are hook and loop and run about a dollar each, but with the dust extraction through the RO head, the paper never gums up and lasts a long time.
 
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