Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 60 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,242 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bat bombs were an experimental World War II weapon developed by the United States. The bomb consisted of a bomb-shaped casing with over a thousand compartments, each containing a hibernating Mexican free-tailed bat with a small, timed incendiary bomb attached. Dropped from a bomber at dawn, the casings would deploy a parachute in mid-flight and open to release the bats, which would then disperse and roost in eaves and attics in a 20–40-mile radius (32–64 km). The incendiaries, which were set on timers, would then ignite and start fires in inaccessible places in the largely wood and paper constructions of the Japanese cities that were the weapon's intended target.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bat_bomb


View attachment 105427
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Bat bombs were an experimental World War II weapon developed by the United States. The bomb consisted of a bomb-shaped casing with over a thousand compartments, each containing a hibernating Mexican free-tailed bat with a small, timed incendiary bomb attached. Dropped from a bomber at dawn, the casings would deploy a parachute in mid-flight and open to release the bats, which would then disperse and roost in eaves and attics in a 20–40-mile radius (32–64 km). The incendiaries, which were set on timers, would then ignite and start fires in inaccessible places in the largely wood and paper constructions of the Japanese cities that were the weapon's intended target.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bat_bomb


View attachment 105427
On the non-desktop version of this site I clicked on the off topic category and your thread stopped at the word Mexican.

It looked like this from my iPhone:
The bomb consisted of a bomb-shaped casing with over a thousand compartments, each containing a hibernating Mexican

I was afraid to open it up wondering where you were going with it.
 

·
Girl Boss
Joined
·
489 Posts
Bat bombs were an experimental World War II weapon developed by the United States. The bomb consisted of a bomb-shaped casing with over a thousand compartments, each containing a hibernating Mexican free-tailed bat with a small, timed incendiary bomb attached. Dropped from a bomber at dawn, the casings would deploy a parachute in mid-flight and open to release the bats, which would then disperse and roost in eaves and attics in a 20–40-mile radius (32–64 km). The incendiaries, which were set on timers, would then ignite and start fires in inaccessible places in the largely wood and paper constructions of the Japanese cities that were the weapon's intended target.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bat_bomb


View attachment 105427
Soooo...how much do ya think the bomb stuffer got paid cuz I bet it wasn’t nearly enough *shutters
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,666 Posts
Soooo...how much do ya think the bomb stuffer got paid cuz I bet it wasn’t nearly enough *shutters
The ones stuffing bats or Mexicans? :devil3:
 
  • Like
Reactions: PPD and Redux

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Bahahahahahah oh my god I just spit my wine out
Before opening it I thought the post might resemble something along the lines of director Alejandro Damiani’s controversial short film, M.A.M.O.N., where they come raining out of the sky, similar to the hibernating ordnance/payload indicated in the thread, not knowing the ordnance/payload was bats due to where the post got cut off.

https://vimeo.com/292553594
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,974 Posts
I suppose weaponized animals have been a part of combat and law enforcement for years.

I recently read an inspiring book titled Touching The Dragon, by retired Navy Seal James Hatch. The book details James career as a Navy Seal K9 handler and the long recovery he endured from a career ending injury suffered during a mission in Iraq. The book also describes the unique bond between the dogs and their handlers, and the incredible feeling of loss and honor when one is wounded or killed in action.

The following site is an organization James Hatch started. https://www.spikesk9fund.org/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Anybody ever eat bat? I had done a short stint in culinary arts, having been a student at JWU in Providence. 3 members of my intern group were from Thailand, having thrown a dinner party for our group, marinaded grilled fruit bat being one of the appetizers..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,974 Posts
Anybody ever eat bat? I had done a short stint in culinary arts, having been a student at JWU in Providence. 3 members of my intern group were from Thailand, having thrown a dinner party for our group, marinaded grilled Paniki (fruit bat) being one of the appetizers..
I've never eaten bat, but I did eat rattle snake around 1996. I won't go into it, but bad things happened that night in the dark woods of Northern California.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
I've never eaten bat, but I did eat rattle snake around 1996. I won't go into it, but bad things happened that night in the dark woods of Northern California.
It was really pretty good, kinda tasting like small game bird such as quail with a hint of an ammonia-like smell to it. I had gone to the Thai market with them, the bats were in a big plastic bag, whole and frozen. I got a little nervous when they started eye-balling the bugs in the meat section, some looking like large grubs...no thanks, having passed on the deep fried bugs..

There’s a poultry farm by me that sells cryovac’d snake and other exotic and not so common foods. Never tried snake though..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
My great grandfather when I was a kid was a pigeon fancier, having a pigeon coop on his Queen’s rooftop, breeding and keeping homing pigeons...although a fancier of pigeons, he’d often eat pickled sparrows...
In the coal region of PA it was common practice for many first generation Italian immigrants to add song birds to the gravy (tomato sauce). A practice that was common in Italy, I'm told.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
I've never eaten bat, but I did eat rattle snake around 1996. I won't go into it, but bad things happened that night in the dark woods of Northern California.
I ate so much rattlesnake as a kid that the first time I had chicken I said "this tastes like rattlesnake".

Well, that may not be true, but having grown up in prime rattler country in an outdoorsie family, I have eaten rattle snake on many an outing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
In the coal region of PA it was common practice for many first generation Italian immigrants to add song birds to the gravy (tomato sauce). A practice that was common in Italy, I'm told.
The Italian Sparrow along with other songbirds are common Mediterranean peasant fare, the Sparrows as a food source being common in Southern Italy where he and my paternal ancestors immigrated from, although family tradition in our households didn’t utilize songbirds in gravy aka red sauces.

Chances are if you’ve attend a catered function at an upscale hotel or country club, you’ve likely had a taste of my family’s Italian fare, my extended family being in the food service industry selling out to Schwann.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
It was really pretty good, kinda tasting like small game bird such as quail with a hint of an ammonia-like smell to it. I had gone to the Thai market with them, the bats were in a big plastic bag, whole and frozen. I got a little nervous when they started eye-balling the bugs in the meat section, some looking like large grubs..
I once saw a piece on TV about a commercial rat trapper. I believe he plied his trade in Thailand. He would load them in a couple of cages fastened to his scooter or bike (I forget which it was), and off to market he would go. These cages were about the size of a clothes washer and packed with 100's of rats destined for the pot!:scooter:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
I've heard of stuffing birds i.e. turkeys, chickens, cornish hen's, etc. The only ones I knew of that were stuffing bats were MLB players!
MLB: Caught Cheating - YouTube
I remember when Sammy Sosa got caught with the corked bat! As if the steroids weren't enough? They say you have to soak the cork first. A corksoaker will do things like that, I hear.
 
1 - 20 of 60 Posts
Top