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You use Scuff-X on doors and trim? My go-to trim paint is Regal semi-gloss.

Does Scuff-X run when spraying?

One thing I hate about Benjamin Moore is that all the individual stores are privately owned. You don't have sales reps who comp you fivers like the big companies. I've never once in my life been comped even a single gallon by a BM store owner. They aren't the best salesman.
I absolutely use scuffx on doors and trim. Its a dream to work with.anything will run and sag if not applied properly but this product isn't as finicky as some others and rolls,brushes or sprays very easily leaving a rock hard surface ready for recoat (if needed) very quickly. It also seems to cover very well in the dark and white bases that I've used


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I absolutely use scuffx on doors and trim. Its a dream to work with.anything will run and sag if not applied properly but this product isn't as finicky as some others and rolls,brushes or sprays very easily leaving a rock hard surface ready for recoat (if needed) very quickly. It also seems to cover very well in the dark and white bases that I've used


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I havn't sprayed scuffx my self but it seems to lay out pretty nice with a brush and microplush without any extender.

The semi-gloss scuffx (coming soon?) supposed to have some anti-chip technology with it too.
 

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You forgot scuff x on the trim and 508 on the lids.
But YES to the wisdom here.

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You use Scuff-X on doors and trim? My go-to trim paint is Regal semi-gloss.

Does Scuff-X run when spraying?

One thing I hate about Benjamin Moore is that all the individual stores are privately owned. You don't have sales reps who comp you fivers like the big companies. I've never once in my life been comped even a single gallon by a BM store owner. They aren't the best salesman.
Here in Newfoundland, BM is distributed through "The Paint Shop". They're a chain store but individually owned. They have a B.M rep and hes compin me stuff all the time.
Buys me beer, paint ball outings, bbqs. You name it.
I used to buy alot from Dulux when I lived in BC. Because they had great customer service and pretty good products.
But the service at the stores out East is so bad I stopped going..
All about customer service..sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I agree customer service is a big one. The paint rep I met today is good in that way and they know me from my previous company. So they are into helping out getting going and if I make money so do they lol. I know the BM guy too so he will be my next target now that I have something to go off of.

The good thing about the SW rep is I can call him to sites and have him help me out with those tricky customers. Looks more professional with back up
 

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. But in reality how far will that get you when every other painter is doing the same thing?

That can be said about a bunch of different companies. Look at all the people on here saying Ben Moore? Big deal, now he's got to buy BM and compete with people putting on BM. Now what?



Can't use that as a valid argument of a business proposition. This guy has to figure out a niche in his business market, the way he runs/operates his crew, marketing, maybe all of the above.
 

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Hey guys, question is what paints do you recommend and why. I want to have 3 tiers of paint prices to propose to my customers to meet their needs.
Cheers

I'll give my 2 cents, take it for what it's worth.



This is what I would do if I was you because I've tried that price tier thing and when I re-worded my proposals it showed me how to set them up.



Spec the customer. Ask them. If you feel the customer wants a cheap job. Ask them specifically and to their face. Do you want a cheap in and out paint job? Chances are they'll back up and say "no", they don't want a shi*ty job. Ok...then you can establish what type of work they want.



It's going to come down to the scope of work, more so than the paint products used. If they want you to caulk every single joint in the house, that's going to cost a ton more money (labor) than it is if you pay $24 per gallon for promar 400 vs $29 for promar 200. Going to cost WAY more. So don't train your mind into thinking that the cost of the product is the big factor in it, chances are it's labor or unseen labor.




With that being said. Create a standard for your company. Specify that as "this is what we recommend". Then follow it up with 2 different price points based ONLY on cost of material differential, giving you a total of "3" price points. $5,000 to use emerald (recommended), $4,500 (super paint), and $3,800 (a100). Or whatever.



The labor will remain the same. A lot of guys will try and lower and lower the cost of the total by subtracting some hours here, fudging this there, and then picking a lower grade paint in attempts to win the bid. At some point in time, you hit a road block and now your risking a lot. Same labor hours, different paints is all.


With that being said, these are my recommendations for you:


Walls/Ceilings:
EcoSelect, Property Solutions, or Painter's Edge (low grade)
Promar Series (mid grade)
Promar 200HP, Cashmere, Duration/Emerald (higher grade)


Trim: Trim paint will always cost more than wall paint (should anyway)

Solo (decent price, good product though) [interior/exterior]
ProClassic (high grade) [interior only]
Pro Industrial WB Alkyd Urethane (high grade) [interior/exterior]



Primers:
For spraying only: Hi-Build Primer / Surfacer
Others:

PVA (low price)
Wall and Wood (high)
Extreme Bond (very high) [benefit is it will help to hard to stick surface and conversion of oil to wb coatings]





Lots to learn in this industry, wish it was as simple as 1 or 2 paints, brush or roll. But too many coatings for too many variety of substrates and situations.



Good luck! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I'll give my 2 cents, take it for what it's worth.



This is what I would do if I was you because I've tried that price tier thing and when I re-worded my proposals it showed me how to set them up.



Spec the customer. Ask them. If you feel the customer wants a cheap job. Ask them specifically and to their face. Do you want a cheap in and out paint job? Chances are they'll back up and say "no", they don't want a shi*ty job. Ok...then you can establish what type of work they want.



It's going to come down to the scope of work, more so than the paint products used. If they want you to caulk every single joint in the house, that's going to cost a ton more money (labor) than it is if you pay $24 per gallon for promar 400 vs $29 for promar 200. Going to cost WAY more. So don't train your mind into thinking that the cost of the product is the big factor in it, chances are it's labor or unseen labor.




With that being said. Create a standard for your company. Specify that as "this is what we recommend". Then follow it up with 2 different price points based ONLY on cost of material differential, giving you a total of "3" price points. $5,000 to use emerald (recommended), $4,500 (super paint), and $3,800 (a100). Or whatever.



The labor will remain the same. A lot of guys will try and lower and lower the cost of the total by subtracting some hours here, fudging this there, and then picking a lower grade paint in attempts to win the bid. At some point in time, you hit a road block and now your risking a lot. Same labor hours, different paints is all.


With that being said, these are my recommendations for you:


Walls/Ceilings:
EcoSelect, Property Solutions, or Painter's Edge (low grade)
Promar Series (mid grade)
Promar 200HP, Cashmere, Duration/Emerald (higher grade)


Trim: Trim paint will always cost more than wall paint (should anyway)

Solo (decent price, good product though) [interior/exterior]
ProClassic (high grade) [interior only]
Pro Industrial WB Alkyd Urethane (high grade) [interior/exterior]



Primers:
For spraying only: Hi-Build Primer / Surfacer
Others:

PVA (low price)
Wall and Wood (high)
Extreme Bond (very high) [benefit is it will help to hard to stick surface and conversion of oil to wb coatings]





Lots to learn in this industry, wish it was as simple as 1 or 2 paints, brush or roll. But too many coatings for too many variety of substrates and situations.



Good luck! :)
Really awesome reply thanks! I do understand that labour is the number one cost. I'm not interested in banging jobs out and having low quality work, my goal is honest, quality work and being a dependable company true to there word. But I do want that few hundred dollar wiggle room in jobs and an ability to meet customer needs. If they don't care about the paint-- pro mar 200, if they care about finish--cashmere ( Opulence in Canada) etc...

Thanks for taking the time to write your reply though!
 

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S-W can get extremely cheap for Promar 200. Around $20 easy if you have buying power. We just use it on everything. Low VOC for all!

Use the notes section to say “Add $500 for Superpaint and 800 for emerald” or whatever

I’d keep it simple though... Use the same interior paint on all jobs... Value is just as important as quality.

Upcharge for anything else and sell on customer service/ value
 

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I'll give my 2 cents, take it for what it's worth.



This is what I would do if I was you because I've tried that price tier thing and when I re-worded my proposals it showed me how to set them up.



Spec the customer. Ask them. If you feel the customer wants a cheap job. Ask them specifically and to their face. Do you want a cheap in and out paint job? Chances are they'll back up and say "no", they don't want a shi*ty job. Ok...then you can establish what type of work they want.



It's going to come down to the scope of work, more so than the paint products used. If they want you to caulk every single joint in the house, that's going to cost a ton more money (labor) than it is if you pay $24 per gallon for promar 400 vs $29 for promar 200. Going to cost WAY more. So don't train your mind into thinking that the cost of the product is the big factor in it, chances are it's labor or unseen labor.




With that being said. Create a standard for your company. Specify that as "this is what we recommend". Then follow it up with 2 different price points based ONLY on cost of material differential, giving you a total of "3" price points. $5,000 to use emerald (recommended), $4,500 (super paint), and $3,800 (a100). Or whatever.



The labor will remain the same. A lot of guys will try and lower and lower the cost of the total by subtracting some hours here, fudging this there, and then picking a lower grade paint in attempts to win the bid. At some point in time, you hit a road block and now your risking a lot. Same labor hours, different paints is all.


With that being said, these are my recommendations for you:


Walls/Ceilings:
EcoSelect, Property Solutions, or Painter's Edge (low grade)
Promar Series (mid grade)
Promar 200HP, Cashmere, Duration/Emerald (higher grade)


Trim: Trim paint will always cost more than wall paint (should anyway)

Solo (decent price, good product though) [interior/exterior]
ProClassic (high grade) [interior only]
Pro Industrial WB Alkyd Urethane (high grade) [interior/exterior]



Primers:
For spraying only: Hi-Build Primer / Surfacer
Others:

PVA (low price)
Wall and Wood (high)
Extreme Bond (very high) [benefit is it will help to hard to stick surface and conversion of oil to wb coatings]





Lots to learn in this industry, wish it was as simple as 1 or 2 paints, brush or roll. But too many coatings for too many variety of substrates and situations.



Good luck! :)
They may say they don't want a cheap, crappy job but when you give them a price that is above their expectations they'll squirm like a worm!
 

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They may say they don't want a cheap, crappy job but when you give them a price that is above their expectations they'll squirm like a worm!

And how many of those clients usually turn into an issue later?



I've found they are either tire kickers or they are pain in the rear people looking to get stuff for virtually free.



Screw that, we got heavy duty bills to pay, none of this do great quality work for a cheap price around here. ;)


Down payments and phase out payment schedules on the people that nickle and dime. Can't be trusted.


edit:
this is where a good proposal and contract detailing everything you plan on doing plus all the steps involved. Sometimes it goes to show them there is a lot more work into it than taking a brush and slapping paint on stuff.



It also helps protect the contractor from customers holding your check hostage because "paint doors" on your simple line item sheet, also happened to mean painting all the doors in the house, not just the room you came to look at. After all, devil is in the details. ;)
 

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You also shouldn't eat hamburgers at Red Robin because there is a McDonalds in every town and they are a better value.
 
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if you dealing with:

homeowners:
use anything sherwin williams, homeowners think they are god, store on every corner & 40% off sales all the time, but beware SW is a rabbit hole

GC's: PPG, great products, fair price and GC's are looking only at numbers

Building a company name?
Benjamin Moore delivers quality

they all have good & bad products, learn you market, you can make money doing production work painting rentals or painting high dollar homes ... find your niche
I agree. I started a design/remodel company in May. I keep going back to BM. I’m currently loving Scuff X. From my experience, customers will pay the upgrade fees, if educated on the paints. I’ve just used it on my own house, and wished I had found it sooner!! I painted a year ago and have scuff marks everywhere!! Ugh!! I have heard it’s not great at taking lots of washings. Anyone, have any knowledge on this? I’ve currently used it on walls, wainscoting and cabinets. So far, it’s been great!
 
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