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Discussion Starter #1
I've heard from many painters on here that the proper application method for Aura paint is to let the cut-ins dry before rolling. My process has always been to try to keep a wet edge on the cut-ins so that everything blends together, and because my process involves: (1) cut-in, (2) 4 inch roll the cut-in, (3) roll the wall/ceiling, I'm scrambling to keep it from drying.

My question is for those of you that recommend letting the cut-ins dry before rolling, do you also let your 4-in roll border dry before rolling the main wall, or would your 4 inch perimeter roll be part of your rolling process after you let the brush cut-in dry? I want to try out this method with a bathroom using Aura Bath and Spa.
 

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What's the purpose of using the 4" roller over your cut? I think you can probably skip that step and it will be fine. I don't know a single person who does that around here anyway
Supposedly reducing brush marks by leaving the same texture as your main roller sleeve as you can get in closer. I've never done it before, but I'm pretty sure I've seen several guys on here posting about it being a thing. Personally, I don't have the time to wait for yet another round of cutting in a wall with a weenie roller to dry before rolling out the field of a wall.
 

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We usually have one guy "cut and mini-roll the perimeter", and another guy "roll out the middle with a big roller". Its an easy way to keep a wet edge, working one wall at a time. The mini roller could probably be skipped, but it ensures the big roller doesn't have to get too close to the ceiling (and might help with hat-banding and brush marks).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What's the purpose of using the 4" roller over your cut? I think you can probably skip that step and it will be fine. I don't know a single person who does that around here anyway
As others mentioned above, it helps blend the cut-in with the main roller mark, allows for a more precise cut-in brush so you don't have to grow the brush stroke far enough to allow the large format roller to connect the cut-in, and also helps with things like vaulted ceilings and acute angle wall connections in which a roller would not be able to get very close at all due to the perpendicular wall.

To bring this thread back to the original question, does anyone have insight with Aura specifically about letting the cut in mini roller dry as well, or is it better to keep a wet edge on the mini roller? Letting it dry would be great if it's actually beneficial. I've seen many people say that letting the cut-in dry is the ideal method for Aura, but no mention if that's just the brush or the mini roller as well.

I'd also be curious as to why this is the preferred method for Aura when it's not for other paints.
 

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As others mentioned above, it helps blend the cut-in with the main roller mark, allows for a more precise cut-in brush so you don't have to grow the brush stroke far enough to allow the large format roller to connect the cut-in, and also helps with things like vaulted ceilings and acute angle wall connections in which a roller would not be able to get very close at all due to the perpendicular wall.

To bring this thread back to the original question, does anyone have insight with Aura specifically about letting the cut in mini roller dry as well, or is it better to keep a wet edge on the mini roller? Letting it dry would be great if it's actually beneficial. I've seen many people say that letting the cut-in dry is the ideal method for Aura, but no mention if that's just the brush or the mini roller as well.

I'd also be curious as to why this is the preferred method for Aura when it's not for other paints.
Actually it is my preferred method for pretty much all BM paints in fact I've never used or prescribed them to be used any different and never had an issue doing it that way.

With BM seemingly moving back to non zero VOC paint products that may change in the future.
 

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Actually it is my preferred method for pretty much all BM paints in fact I've never used or prescribed them to be used any different and never had an issue doing it that way.

With BM seemingly moving back to non zero VOC paint products that may change in the future.
Yeah, I abandoned the “keep a wet edge” method for wall paints years ago. My preferred wall paint is Regal eggshell and I’ve never had an issue with lap marks.


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To the op. I have used two gallons of the aura bath and spa. Both just in a 1b tinted to white. Covered excellent (2 coats over a beige) and finished by letting the cut in dry fully. I use fans to dry my work so it doesn’t take too long to wait.


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the first time I used Aura I pretty much let the cut in dry kinda just because I cut the whole room in before I started rolling it

At that I didnt let it dry enough because what was dry ish re wet when I rolled over it causing sags

The 2nd time I used it was years later at a Customers request because she had bought some prior to me doing this room for her

It was old wood paneling and I primed it with shellac so thered be no bleed out,well my brain bled from all the frustration of using that Aura on those walls

It was setting up as I rolled and roping up all over the place,I dont think it liked the Shellac,I ended up having to wet sand the rope all over that room and buying another gallon and taping and spraying that crap

I will never use that stuff again,to me it's overpriced horse sh_t . At what they charge for it that stuff should at least cooperate,not be a paint in the ass that it is
 

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I have found the sagging issue with Aura interior after rolling walls and believing it would turn out like normal painted walls...
Also with Aura, I found success in cutting in top of walls by brush and 4" rolling cut-ins, feathering it out. Letting the feathered out cut-ins dry is needed unless you apply super super thin.
** However, I haven't had that issue with Aura Bath and Spa... just haven't had it sag. Maybe it's different but I can tell you that stuff has good adhesion.

For those that haven't 4" mini rolled your cut-ins or taped and mini rolled... yes it's extremely effective and fast and a much more consistent finish and texture than brushing alone. The method is great against taped off trim, and inside corners of walls etc, without using a brush.
 

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To the OP: letting it dry before painting is the same whether brushing or rolling, so either keep it wet or let it dry, but don't roll it tacky.

As an aside, I fully agree with @ridesarize and I'm surprised more people don't use the the mini-roll method, but I just realized we're probably painting a lot more textured walls than many here. In the Pacific Northwest, walls are primarily orange peel with knockdown or brocade ceilings. For textured surfaces, I don't think anyone could convince me that brushing alone is more efficient. We cut in with deuces and use the brush with a mini-roller, so it's done at the same time. Make the cut, roll & feather out. 2-3 dips of the brush for the tight cut takes care of everything within reach, roll it immediately to carry the paint further. Takes 10 seconds at most to carry the paint 5" from the cut when it would take at least double or triple with the brush. IMO, it lessens the risk of hat-banding because you're not having to take your big roller right to the edge every time. Also lessens the risk of holidays since you'd be rolling with your big roller back into areas that you feathered out with your small roller. All those areas that are too small to fit a normal roller in leaves you brush guys spending over a minute on what a mini roller can do in a few seconds. Interior corners, same thing. Next to angled/vaulted ceilings, same. Around trim, same. Using the same nap & cover type on your mini and your main roller prevents issues with the finished look. Again, I'm more referring to textured walls vs. smooth. For smooth surfaces which have been adequately sealed, I know that a brush alone could be extremely efficient for cut-in without the need for the mini-roller.

As painters, we tend to get stuck in our ways and focus our efforts on improving the way "we've always used" vs. searching for a more efficient way to get to the finish line. I know I'm just as guilty as anyone.
 

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I have found the sagging issue with Aura interior after rolling walls and believing it would turn out like normal painted walls...
Also with Aura, I found success in cutting in top of walls by brush and 4" rolling cut-ins, feathering it out. Letting the feathered out cut-ins dry is needed unless you apply super super thin.
** However, I haven't had that issue with Aura Bath and Spa... just haven't had it sag. Maybe it's different but I can tell you that stuff has good adhesion.

For those that haven't 4" mini rolled your cut-ins or taped and mini rolled... yes it's extremely effective and fast and a much more consistent finish and texture than brushing alone. The method is great against taped off trim, and inside corners of walls etc, without using a brush.
"sagging" and "open time" are some of the updates coming to the reformulated aura as well as better hide in off whites and no longer being a zero voc product. My understanding is it will have some scuffx technology as well. I've heard its more friendly to work with, but havn't had a chance to use it my self.
 

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How does that work?
It works awesome. 1.5" blue tape over trimwork, or if you wanted to tape an accent wall color to make an inside corner transition (cut-in)... with experience of how to avoid tape bleeds and other stuff, it works awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Again, I'm more referring to textured walls vs. smooth. For smooth surfaces which have been adequately sealed, I know that a brush alone could be extremely efficient for cut-in without the need for the mini-roller.
Thanks for that distinction. I'm working with smooth walls. I'm not clear on how this matters, however. Other than maybe textured walls benefiting even more. Most of the benefits you gave for the mini roller seem to apply regardless of surface, do they not?
 

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Thanks for that distinction. I'm working with smooth walls. I'm not clear on how this matters, however. Other than maybe textured walls benefiting even more. Most of the benefits you gave for the mini roller seem to apply regardless of surface, do they not?
Textured surfaces require a lot more application of product and working in of that product, and since a loaded mini roller goes about 5-7 times further on a textured surface than a loaded brush, a roller is gonna be far more efficient. Smooth surfaces that have been sealed well can be painted efficiently either way, although one could argue that a roller could speed up the process...at least in areas where a lot of cutting is required, (bathrooms, hallways, kitchens, etc).
 
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