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Need help please...

We've been contracted to paint a large bedroom.

Removed all wallpaper and discovered several areas where the primer that was put on prior to the paper was blistering.

Repaired the areas and put new primer on the walls...several areas are blistering again.

This is a bedroom with no moisture problem that we can find.

Any ideas what is causing this and how to fix it?

We've done a lot of repair work and haven't had this happen before.

Thanks for any and all suggestions,

Bobbi
 

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Did you remove all adhesive? sand all mud repairs and clean/tack? Allow enough time between coats for the wall to dry? Can you find if it ever had a moisture problem? It might help to know the history of the wall before the paper was applied. May be a case of someone in the past goofing up. I know of one case where a wall got wet and looked stable. But I think the rock had to be replaced.
 

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I've seen/had this problem before. All looks well until you put the new paper on. It can be caused by not using the correct primer initially - Maybe just a coat of latex rather than the correct wallboard prmer. It's okay for the first round of wallpaper but when it comes to stripping and redoing then that's when the sheet hits the fan.

I had this on a timber garage exterior too once. Litterally hundreds of blisters. Scraped them down, primed and recoated. The sun came out and up popped more blisters :blink:

Things like that just go along with the territory
 

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Is the blistering in the primer? Or the wallpaper prep coat?

By any chance, are you experiencing the dreaded Peeling Sunburn Skin Syndrome (PSSS). - you'll know what I mean if you are.

Also by any chance, do you have any pictures that will show exactly what you are seeing?

It's tough to diagnose a surface condition explained only by the written word (proof that English ain't perfect)

-Bill
 

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Is there any possibility that you could let the surface with the bubbling dry for a day or two and see if it shrinks back down? I have primed over WP and seen bubbling but with time it disappeared. Then I recoat with paint later with no problems.
 

· PinheadsUnite
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I have primed over WP

Jason, Jason, Jason,

Please never do that. WP should be REMOVED, not painted over. In the future WHEN it fails or someone wants to do the job CORRECTLY, you have created a god awful mess and headache for him/her. Your karma has been destroyed by doing this, I hate to think what you will be reincarnated as.

the ONLY time WP should be primed over is if a previos hack had hung on raw rock.
 

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What is in the blister? Smell it and see if you can identify the odor. How large are the blisters? Are they large, the size of a quarter, or small like a pea? How soon did the blisters appear? One thing to note is that high quality latex paints over poor quality latex paints can sometimes disolve the binder in the cheap stuff and create a blister. Make sure that all the glue from previous jobs is completely removed. Paste and paint are not compatable for the most part. What kind of residence is this? Is there any chance that at some point a poor quality "blow and go" type coating was used in the original construction? You may need to put an oil base primer down as a barrier, to prevent the acrylic or water from activating glue, re-wetting the glue, or attacking the binder of the previous system. Just some thoughts.
 

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.... the ONLY time WP should be primed over is if a previos hack had hung on raw rock.
Not every home owner wants the WP removed. I did a flip home a few months ago and they just wanted in cleaned up. They did not want the extra cost of removing 3 LAYERS of 30year old WP... So, our only option was to prime over it and paint it. So, not every situation requires the utmost perfect way of solving an issue. Believe me... I offered to remove the WP.... They didn't want it... my previous post gave the experience I speak of about bubbling WP. We primed, seen bubbling, let it dry, it shrank back down, we painted the next day, some more minor bubbling, it dried, shrank back down. done.

Every job is situational. Some prep processes are not always the best approach, it really comes down to what the HO is willing to pay for.
 

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Not every home owner wants the WP removed. I did a flip home a few months ago and they just wanted in cleaned up. They did not want the extra cost of removing 3 LAYERS of 30year old WP... So, our only option was to prime over it and paint it. So, not every situation requires the utmost perfect way of solving an issue. Believe me... I offered to remove the WP.... They didn't want it... my previous post gave the experience I speak of about bubbling WP. We primed, seen bubbling, let it dry, it shrank back down, we painted the next day, some more minor bubbling, it dried, shrank back down. done.

Every job is situational. Some prep processes are not always the best approach, it really comes down to what the HO is willing to pay for.
OK, we will agree to VEHEMENTLY disagree.

I can not nor will I allow my name to go on a paint over.

I've been the one who has stripped six layers of wallpaper, two of which were painted. My feeling is that it is unethical for anyone to be part and parcel of doing a sh!tty job for which someone else in the future must pay !!!

I can not politely tell you how this attitude makes my blood boil. I ranks right up there with buying hazardous waste in your backyard.
 

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Not every home owner wants the WP removed. I did a flip home a few months ago and they just wanted in cleaned up. They did not want the extra cost of removing 3 LAYERS of 30year old WP... So, our only option was to prime over it and paint it. So, not every situation requires the utmost perfect way of solving an issue. Believe me... I offered to remove the WP.... They didn't want it... my previous post gave the experience I speak of about bubbling WP. We primed, seen bubbling, let it dry, it shrank back down, we painted the next day, some more minor bubbling, it dried, shrank back down. done.

Every job is situational. Some prep processes are not always the best approach, it really comes down to what the HO is willing to pay for.
I have to agree with Jason here. Not every repaint we do is for the single guy driving the Porsche. Some people just cannot afford or do not want removal of (sometimes multiple layers) of wallpaper. This can get very pricey. Don't get me wrong, I've done a lot of jobs where stripping the wallpaper and repairing/priming the drywall underneath is done. I agree this is the "proper" way to do it. However, sometimes that's just not what the customer is willing to pay for.

When we bid a repaint for a room with paper, we tell the customer what should be done. We explain that the wallpaper should be removed, etc, etc. Then we give them the other option, paint over it! We have done a number of jobs where we simply skim the seams then prime and paint right over top of it! The customer knows before hand that there is no warranty, and it (generally) will not look as good as removing the paper. Some people just want to get the color on the wall.

Is it the right way? probably not. Is it what the customer is willing to pay for? Yep. Will I walk away if the customer wants to pay me to do it the cheap way? Nope!
 

· PinheadsUnite
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I guess it comes down to where you draw the line about prostituting youself.

We all know that eventually SOMEONE has to pay for this, and it's going to be some poor schmo who did not know the house he/she bought was a can of worms.

Just because you are not the one who has made the decision to do what is wrong, you are the hit man.

"But your honor, I didn't make the decision to kill the guy, I was only hired to do it"

If you know it's wrong, then I question your ethics about doing it. "no" is a very easy word to prononce.
 

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I completely disagree with that logic and your example is quite flawed. It should be more along the lines of "But your honor, I didnt make the decision to kill the guy using a gunshot to the head, I was only hired to do it. The proper way would have been to choke him to death as there is less mess for the clean up guys to deal with".

The bottom line is the customer gets what he wants, the customer understands the issues and cost that will incur should they decide to remove the paper at a later date, and I get to earn some money and make them happy. I cant see turning down a job because it might adversly affect another tradesman who may or may never deal with the results of the customer's decision. Its just like painting over some drywall in a garage without sanding the seams. And in the future it'll take extra work to make it look like a proper wall, but there is no greater chance of paint failure and it's what the customer wants. Any future finisher will charge to skim the seams agian. Win x3

I assume it's the same with paper hangers. Do you not make money either way? I understand that stripping painted paper is a pain, but don't you put that into your price? I could understand it if the customer would be in the dark about the whole thing, but in these scenarios they are fulling informed.
 

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When a customer asks you to put a band aid on a problem, you do have to ask yourself how much you are willing to compromise your professional standards. These days, it seems there are enough desparate painters that are willing to stretch quite far in that direction. In spite of that, it is good to remember how to say no.
 

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I completely disagree with that logic .
And I completely disagree with the ethics of doing something that will knowingly fail at a future time and lay the burden of 3x the cost for remediation at the feet of others. Personally, I do not need to profit off that kind of fraud.

If the homeowner HONESTLY expects to be the one who will pay the future costs, that's another situation.

If it's a making money quick with a flip scam, then the ethics of being part of the deceit is highly suspect.

But we can go back and forth all day on this. May I suggest you put yourself in the position of the innocent future owner and project how you would feel about buying a gilded can of worms.

Many other professions have laws protecting future owners from this type of cover up. We need to self police.
 

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When a customer asks you to put a band aid on a problem, you do have to ask yourself how much you are willing to compromise your professional standards. These days, it seems there are enough desparate painters that are willing to stretch quite far in that direction. In spite of that, it is good to remember how to say no.
If a front door has some lifted poly at the bottom, do you demand the customer strip, restain, and reclear the door? Do you walk away if the customer only wants the damaged areas touched up and a new coat of clear? We need to compare apples to apples here, this isnt the same as if painters with this mindset are brushing lacquer on a deck. I'm offended that you would call painters who dont do things your way 'desperate'.
 
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