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For about the last two years, I've noticed when having a competitors color made in BM products, the color is usually off by a shade sometimes two. I'm gonna say the blame is with the gennex tints. They are a game changer in the positive no doubt, but they are a different animal compared to glycol based tints used by everyone else. So I'm assuming this is why competitive colors aren't coming out exact. Any thoughts?
 

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For about the last two years, I've noticed when having a competitors color made in BM products, the color is usually off by a shade sometimes two. I'm gonna say the blame is with the gennex tints. They are a game changer in the positive no doubt, but they are a different animal compared to glycol based tints used by everyone else. So I'm assuming this is why competitive colors aren't coming out exact. Any thoughts?
who’s doing the matching and what is it getting matched too? Is it a formula from the data base? Is if a computer match? Is it an eye match? Who’s letting the color not be right prior to it leaving the store or going on the surface?
 

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Color matching is always done by a BM company owned store. Aways a formula match. Its always sampled matched on the competitors color swatch which looks fine. But realistically, placing a small wet sample on the color swatch to be dried down and taking that as a sure match, isn't a great representation of a proper color matching.
A shade or even two off will probably never get called out, but when BM was using glycol tints like everyone else, the formula matching was always spot on. So it's why I am assuming the issue lies with the new gennex tints.
 

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Color matching is always done by a BM company owned store. Aways a formula match. Its always sampled matched on the competitors color swatch which looks fine. But realistically, placing a small wet sample on the color swatch to be dried down and taking that as a sure match, isn't a great representation of a proper color matching.
A shade or even two off will probably never get called out, but when BM was using glycol tints like everyone else, the formula matching was always spot on. So it's why I am assuming the issue lies with the new gennex tints.
Its the swatches. I picked up a couple swatches from SW the other day and all 10 were a slightly different tone visually and under my spectrometer. I ended up purchasing a sample pint to match to instead.
 

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Company color chips have batch variations. Chips vary from store to store, how and where they are stored etc. Color chips are lacquers inks and dyes. Benjamin Moore has independent stores, people that put their own money at risk. This may sound odd but usually the formula is the correct and matches the standard but since chips drift it always looks like the paint is wrong. It’s important to have tint dispensers calibrated semi annually to insure accuracy. Color computers have become very accurate but are not a substitute for hand matching. When matching colors, it’s important to match the chip or sample of who ever is approving and paying for the job. We always do draw downs of all colors and finishes and have the color and sheen/finish approved prior to starting painting. I have customers complain all the time the paint doesn’t match the chip. When usually I get them to admit they just didn’t like the color and wanted replacement paint at no charge.
 

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If your trying to match it up to the actual colour on the wall, your better off cutting out a sample from the wall instead of a colour chip. As others have said, every colour book is a little different. I've not really had any trouble..Sometimes it's the sheen as all products are different also.
 

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I think the issue is other companies don't account for a true white base like BM has. Most other companies have a grayer base to start with to make a paint cover better, but messes with color accuracy. So if they try to 1:1 match BM colors without accounting for it, sometimes it's off. I've heard with SW specifically if you want a really accurate match you need to have the color made in "High Reflective White" base and not the normal white base.

Of course this is mostly conjecture, but yeah.
 

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Company color chips have batch variations. Chips vary from store to store, how and where they are stored etc. Color chips are lacquers inks and dyes. Benjamin Moore has independent stores, people that put their own money at risk. This may sound odd but usually the formula is the correct and matches the standard but since chips drift it always looks like the paint is wrong. It’s important to have tint dispensers calibrated semi annually to insure accuracy. Color computers have become very accurate but are not a substitute for hand matching. When matching colors, it’s important to match the chip or sample of who ever is approving and paying for the job. We always do draw downs of all colors and finishes and have the color and sheen/finish approved prior to starting painting. I have customers complain all the time the paint doesn’t match the chip. When usually I get them to admit they just didn’t like the color and wanted replacement paint at no charge.
I just bought my own weight/gallon cups to measure colorant density my self since BM won't give me the info anymore to calibrate my machine. They used to print it on the can...
 

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I just bought my own weight/gallon cups to measure colorant density my self since BM won't give me the info anymore to calibrate my machine. They used to print it on the can...
we have a service that comes every 6 months. What’s frustrating is matches or gallons that were tinted at other retailers who may not be as critical of calibrating their equipment. Ben Moore needs to be better at emphasizing and supporting the accuracy of equipment that tints its paint.
 

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we have a service that comes every 6 months. What’s frustrating is matches or gallons that were tinted at other retailers who may not be as critical of calibrating their equipment. Ben Moore needs to be better at emphasizing and supporting the accuracy of equipment that tints its paint.
Yeah BM flat out told me I was on my own of I wanted accurate weight/gallon. I had a 'professional' sent by fluid management to come calibrate it:
1) he wasted an entire gallon worth of pigment flushing the lines.
2) using density measurements from 2017
3) used an uncalibrated $10 mini amazon scale.

After a few test batches finally I just said screw it I'll do it my self and spent a couple hundred on a quality scale and specific gravity cup. IMO BM should train their sales reps to calibrate these machines or at least make sure their partners like FM will properly calibrate them.
 

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Yeah BM flat out told me I was on my own of I wanted accurate weight/gallon. I had a 'professional' sent by fluid management to come calibrate it:
1) he wasted an entire gallon worth of pigment flushing the lines.
2) using density measurements from 2017
3) used an uncalibrated $10 mini amazon scale.

After a few test batches finally I just said screw it I'll do it my self and spent a couple hundred on a quality scale and specific gravity cup. IMO BM should train their sales reps to calibrate these machines or at least make sure their partners like FM will properly calibrate them.
The reps should know that the machines should be calibrated! Would minimize color complaints.
 

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The reps should know that the machines should be calibrated! Would minimize color complaints.
Heres the response from BM technical. I was pretty mad when I read this email, brand new tint machine to tint THEIR product and BM doesn't even care.

If he is really concerned about being accurate, he should purchase a weight per gallon cup and determine the density of the colorant in each canister when he is calibrating.
 

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Yeah BM flat out told me I was on my own of I wanted accurate weight/gallon. I had a 'professional' sent by fluid management to come calibrate it:
1) he wasted an entire gallon worth of pigment flushing the lines.
2) using density measurements from 2017
3) used an uncalibrated $10 mini amazon scale.

After a few test batches finally I just said screw it I'll do it my self and spent a couple hundred on a quality scale and specific gravity cup. IMO BM should train their sales reps to calibrate these machines or at least make sure their partners like FM will properly calibrate them.
thats poopy of them...
 
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