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It looks like he applied the paint direct to the surface without primer. Strip it to make it look right.
What kind of material is it that is being painted? It looks funny, kind of looks like chipboard.
 

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PinheadsUnite
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30,724 Posts
OMG!

How many things can one do wrong? let me count the ways!

Looks like:

Suface still wet when paint applied
Air and/or surface temperature too low
Applied too thick
If that spot of white at one of the edges is primer, I doubt it was dry before the next coat was put on.
OH, and crappy big box paint.

Yah, what WAS the substrate? Looks to me like time distressed ply.


This all reeks of someone in a hurry using economy materials
 

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PinheadsUnite
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Can you paint T-111 ? - which is, after all, just expensive ply.

Stain is the only coating I've seen (barely) suitable for T-111
 

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That's T-111 - and I totally believe what the old painter said he did. If I was confronted by a previously painted T-111 surface in which I pressure washed, scraped, oil spot primed and then double coated with latex paint. I wouldn't be all surprised if their was failure a week later. The best you can get away with is oil solid siding stain.

Don't you just love how the surface cracks just migrate right through the paint? It's like instant water ingress oppurtunity.
 

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PinheadsUnite
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30,724 Posts
Why did you delete the pics? Now you will lose out on some advice from people who really know their stuff.
have no fear, they are on your computer, like they are on mine. In the cache. But I'll save you the time of looking for them.

cached1.jpg

cached2.jpg
 

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Super Moderator
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9,502 Posts
Hmmm. That looks like a job for PeelBond to me. Remove as much loose paint as you can and load it up with PeelBond. That is what I am considering trying in the future on stuff like that at least.
 

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Banned
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14,174 Posts
To all lurking Home Owners...
This is why it is important to hire a Professional Painting Contractor for you future painting projects. Not only did this home owner pay for this crap job. Now they will pay to correct the problem. Just x's the original # by 2 and HOPE that's all it will cost you. And that is if this fool charged correctly, if not you could be looking 3 to 6 x's more, who knows. If this is not repaired they will be looking at siding replacement + a paint job. And if your thinking "ya but that other guy was/is 500 bucks cheaper". I ask you, is it really cheaper or just cheap? What ever the reason it is, now it's a costly repair due to a Unprofessional painting HANDYMAN!
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Do I spy a Behr paint job? Or possibly a interior flat wall that was applied on an exterior substrate. It's because of hacks like this, that make it hard for the legitimate painters like myself and many members I know here on pt.
 

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House Painting Reading PA
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419 Posts
I have seen that millions of times from other paint contractors in Florida. Of Coarse one big problem is them actually painting in 100 degree 100% humidity, but what can you do in Fl.

The next thing they always did was use a paint called Color Wheel, which in my opinion is just a hair above HD. Noe their very top of the line paint is ok as we have used it for a property manager in the past that got huge discounts. It is a high based clay coatings. These dimrod paint contractors would take a 5 of their cheapest Color Wheel and mix it with one gallon of water. The gallon of (Home owners water) was passed on like the price of the gallon of paint. After apply one heavy coat of this product on raw t-111, they were completed. They always asked why it did not touch up also, lol:blink:

Anyhow, everyone could see our paint jobs in a color wheel neighborhood because after 3 months theirs looked like the one in this photo. I went behind and cleaned up on the repaints offering customers a real Exterior Painting Company with answers to their problems

I scraped the loose paint and feather sanded, Low pressure cleaned the surface, fully caulked every joint with either BM,SW, Porter or Duron top line caulk, applied a primer using a spray application/back roll, applied finish coat#1 the same way and followed that up with a spray cap coat.

Finish coats were always either

Benjamin Moore MoorGlo
Sherwin Williams Super Paint
Duron:WeatherShield
Permanizer by Porter Paints
 

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There are so many experts here who believe they understand or know how to cure every painting problem out there. This stuff is T-111, because of the way the wood is laid out - there are tons of stress cracks that makes a mockery of most painting systems. If you go into jobs thinking you are Mr. Fixit - you will be burned. The only way to treat these type of surfaces is to use a Turbo Nozzle - knock off as much paint as you possibly can, and yet have the ability to use ultra high pressure without raising the grain of the wood {this took me 6+ years alone to figure out} And then use a product like XIM all over it and then paint. And even then I wouldn't be surprised if you had premature failure. I myself have been having tons of failure with Maddog lately - it is what it is. T-111 shouldn't be painted with other than transparent/semitransparent oil stains. I have a shed made of the stuff that I use an solid oil based stain on - but eventually even that coating cracks and will become thick enough to start flaking off.

And even better way to accelerate flaking is to actually prime these surfaces with a really thick primer like California's oil base. I've noticed that these primers dry real thick, become brittle and can't keep up with the expansion characteristics of the wood - and they don't penetrate these type of plywood surfaces either. So you end up with a real thick coating that becomes brittle. At least with solid stain - you'd need 3-4 coats before it becomes the same thickness of a California style oil primer. Which gives a few more years of carefree surface. But eventually it all ends up the same way.

I've given up thinking I can diagnose every problem and even if I know the problem - I've given up thinking I can prevent future problems. This is painting - crap happens. If you go on these jobs thinking you are a know-it-all, offer ridiculous warrantees, make stupid promises - eventually you are going to have your a$$ handed back to you.
I know - I've poured my blood and sweat on some jobs and a year later looked like some college outfit painted them. And on others where we agreed upon a 'splash 'n dash' type job - 5 years later it still looks perfect?!!??! That's just how it is.
 

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So are you saying you don't guarantee your work? Or just t111? Why do you think you are having so many failures? I have done communities of 100+ homes with t111 on it and I have not seen a failure yet. I think I will take a trip up to my uncles house to see how that's holding up. Been about 8 or so years, I would think he would have said something. I do guarantee my work of product failure, backed by the supplier in writing, and/or if a failure occurred due to poor craftsmanship, backed by me. I do promise to my costumer that they will receive outstanding service, craftsmanship and products. But I don't go out and telling them that, I live it. Unless of course they are asking or comes up naturally. And even then I would just end up giving them references. What better way to show your guarantee by having you past client voice it to you prospect.
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Who is acting like their Mr. Fixit. I know he is a member here, but he repairs pumps.
 
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