Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What would you use to brighten the top of this weather Cedar bench, so it can be stained again?

Will be using a natural color (almost clear) semi-transparent oil based stain.


112639
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
scrub with oxygen bleach or sodium hydroxide then oxalic acid/brightener. See my thread on refinishing a teak bench from a few years ago
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
scrub with oxygen bleach or sodium hydroxide then oxalic acid/brightener. See my thread on refinishing a teak bench from a few years ago
Never tried Oxi Bleach. @fromthenorthwest mentioned it last week, but I cant find the info again
Would you mind posting a link to the exact product, please?

Your bench turned out nice! (probably due for a refresher soon)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
Never tried Oxi Bleach. @fromthenorthwest mentioned it last week, but I cant find the info again
Would you mind posting a link to the exact product, please?

Your bench turned out nice! (probably due for a refresher soon)
Its sodium percarbonate which you can buy in bulk. Benjaminmoore sells it as composite deck cleaner or really oxiclean works pretty well too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Hey Holland, here's the product I use, but I've always had to order it online... Any of the store-bought brighteners or products mentioned by the other guys would do the job, and probably be easier to get.

I've actually been using more of the oxalic acid based products lately. But I think the one benefit of the sodium percarb cleaners is they're supposed to be more plant and animal friendly as it breaks down into water and ash. So if I'm not mistaken, if I were to have a large house to do, it would probably result in less toxic runoff and less chance of getting into trouble, which I'm plenty capable of already.


 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Holland, here's the product I use, but I've always had to order it online... Any of the store-bought brighteners or products mentioned by the other guys would do the job, and probably be easier to get.

I've actually been using more of the oxalic acid based products lately. But I think the one benefit of the sodium percarb cleaners is they're supposed to be more plant and animal friendly as it breaks down into water and ash. So if I'm not mistaken, if I were to have a large house to do, it would probably result in less toxic runoff and less chance of getting into trouble, which I'm plenty capable of already.


Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Correct me if I'm wrong, but some of the 'acid' cleaners could potentially be problematic if working around anything alkaline like Limestone. Can anyone confirm?

It is not the case for this bench project, but a note for future reference, as we have many Cedar houses in this region that have limestone ledges and window sills, I think I would need to be careful to avoid contacting acid cleaners with limestones.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Correct me if I'm wrong, but some of the 'acid' cleaners could potentially be problematic if working around anything alkaline like Limestone. Can anyone confirm?

It is not the case for this bench project, but a note for future reference, as we have many Cedar houses in this region that have limestone ledges and window sills, I think I would need to be careful to avoid contacting acid cleaners with limestones.
I’ve used OA on limestone & white pre-cast Portland cement pavers to remove rust staining due to iron rich well water used for lawn irrigation. It didn’t appear to have any impact on the texture or appearance when the pavers where cleaned in their entirety, only when spot cleaning rust stains on some factory polished French limestone pavers prior to sealing with an impregnator. Wherever spot cleaned, it resulted in a duller sheen and was visibility apparent but not egregious..

I suspect it can alter the color of stone types which contain ferrous oxide minerals..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
I would use sandpaper to restore the appearance and an appropriate finish to protect it. I doubt that chemicals will achieve a result that is as satisfactory as elbow grease.
 

·
Registered
Independent Painting Contractor
Joined
·
2,335 Posts
I would use sandpaper to restore the appearance and an appropriate finish to protect it. I doubt that chemicals will achieve a result that is as satisfactory as elbow grease.
You are absolutely correct on that AND after bleaching sanding would still be required.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top